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Hot deals for LIFT planes in the Middle East, UAE, Saudi Arabia and Egypt



As we said earlier that
Major General Pilot Staff of War / Mahmoud Fouad Abdel-Gawad
The Chief of Staff of the Air Force
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will visit India to conduct discussions of cooperation in the aerospace and defense industries in general with the delegation accompanying him

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India and Egypt work towards building strategic relationship with focus on defence and security​


India and Egypt are charting out an increasingly strategic bilateral relationship with more focus on defence and security aspects. While New Delhi is looking at Cairo as its next big market for arms exports, Egypt is eager to play a key role in yielding its influence in Asia as a representative of both Africa and the Arab world, Trend reports citing The Print.
India and Egypt are now partnering with each other across all spectrums of their bilateral ties based on a sound historical and traditional relationship. From exporting wheat to Egypt despite a ban on its shipments to greater military-to-military relationship, India is leaving no stone unturned to bring Egypt under its strategic embrace.
A delegation from the Egyptian Air Force will be visiting this month led by their Air Chief Mahmoud Foaad Abd El-Gawad “to scout for India’s defence equipment” as New Delhi eyes more and more markets to export its defence items post the success of sale of Brahmos to the Philippines in January this year, official sources told ThePrint.
India and Egypt are currently holding a major exercise between both the Air Forces touted to be a “unique exercise with Air assets in a Large Force Engagement environment, simulating various conflict scenarios. The exercise is aimed at enhancing defence cooperation between the two countries and exchange of best practices”, according to a statement issued by the Defence Ministry last week.
“In the present geopolitical scenario, this exercise provides a unique opportunity to showcase the reach and capability of the IAF. It will also provide an opportunity to showcase the Su-30 MKI manufactured in India by HAL and our country’s expertise for deeper indigenisation of spares and components,” it said.
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Sources also said that encouraged by the Brahmos deal — talks for which are also on with Vietnam — New Delhi is increasingly looking at Egypt for a range of its defence produce as Cairo looks to consistently expand and diversify its military hardware.


With concerns growing about India being unable to source repair and spare parts for its Russian equipment, New Delhi is now relying on Cairo to provide these as Egypt also has robust defence ties with Russia, sources said.
India and Egypt are also closely aligning themselves on the security situation in Afghanistan. External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar met his Egyptian counterpart Sameh Shoukry on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly last year to discuss the issue.
Anil Trigunayat, a former Indian envoy to Jordan, Libya, and Malta, told ThePrint that Egypt was looking for more defence items with India but that “they want joint collaborations”.
“Egypt is an important country. It is a unique part of Africa and the Arab world. They have continued to maintain a good relationship with Russia in terms of defence partnership, which is good for India,” he said. “They regard themselves to be a major player. India also wants to collaborate with them on counterterrorism.”
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Tejas Mk1A Buyers will get access to Mk2 and AMCA programs: HAL Chief​


What seems like a marketing strategy that has been pulled out of the US playbook, Chairman and Managing Director of Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL), R Madhavan, told PTI in an interview that countries that will procure Tejas Mk1A will also have an access to alternative availability in Tejas Mark 2 and they can even think of AMCA when they enter production.

Malaysia and Egypt are two countries that have been offered Tejas Mk1A with talks also have been held with Argentina, looking at Malaysian media reports, the winner of the Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) tender for the supply of 18 light combat aircraft (LCA) might be announced in August.

RMAF already has been offered a packaged deal by the HAL that will also see HAL providing spares and supplies for its current Russian Su-30MKM fleet along with that India has agreed to deal in a palm oil barter deal that will allow the Malaysian Defence ministry to make a better case for the purchase of Tejas Mk1A jets with Indian Avionics like Uttam AESA Fire Control Radar with Indian weapons systems like Astra Mk1 BVRAAM and also ability to operate Russian R-73 and R-77 BVRs.

https://idrw.org/tejas-mk1a-buyers-will-get-access-to-mk2-and-amca-programs-hal-chief/


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Egyptian talks include securing spare parts for Russian ِAircraft
MIG-29 & Mi-17 and Russian equipment in the aerospace industry in general, as Egypt previously discussed cooperation in the production of MiG spare parts in Egypt.

 
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A version with 1600 hp engines and slight modifications, a good alternative to the Aerospatiale SA342 Gazelle
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isnt it better to just install the better engine at the gazzelle instead of buying a whole new platform?
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For 20 years, Egypt has refused to buy any helicopter with a single engine, in order to ensure the operation of one of the two engines in the event of failure of the other, such as increasing the safety of the aircraft.

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One of the roles of the LCA will be to clean the airspace from hostile drones that are beginning to spread, so it is not normal to send the Rafale to clear the airspace from penetrating cheap hostile drones.
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Gazelles can be replaced by the Light Utility Helicopter as the sizes are similar, the Dhruv is bigger.

The LIFT question is more interesting. I think it is Italy's deal to lose.
I think Egypt will buy M-346 trainer aircraft and HAL Tejas as LIFT missions.
 
Gazelles can be replaced by the Light Utility Helicopter as the sizes are similar, the Dhruv is bigger.

The LIFT question is more interesting. I think it is Italy's deal to lose.

The Gazelle is not really considered a utility helo, though. It's actually labeled as a light attack and anti-tank helicopter, the latter being its primary mission in the EAF. An upgrade in size to the Dhruv might not necessarily be a bad thing. The Rudra actually looks friggin awesome! Now you know why I was hanging around with you fellas on the IAF thread for the last few years. I knew something like this was bound to happen between India and Egypt except I never actually came out and said it too many times, especially on a Pakistani forum lmfao. :D Good days ahead ISA.

I totally agree with the ball being in the Italian hands. I also think that if it is true, their asking price for the M-346 Arimachi at $50 million a piece is an absolute crazy crack joke. Meaning someone is high on crack in that office putting that price up. I really hope if the EAF goes with the mega deal, it doesn't pay anything remotely close to that crazy *** crackhead number.

Although if the EAF had to supposedly negotiated the Typhoon number from 200 million down to 125 million, it might not be too far fetched for the Italians to put a figure of $50 million on those trainers and a greater possibility the EAF will have negotiated harder for a reduction.

Especially with America's successive refusal to supply the F-16 to Saudi Arabia, which are sold at a price of 150 million dollars

Wuuuuuuut?! Come, on, maaaan! Please give me some source that mentions that crackhead price to the Saudis!? Now that is even crazier than the 50 mill for the M-346 or the 200 mill for the EFT. Even if they were Block 102s with SABR rattling AESA radars and F-35 avionics suite, to ask the Saudis to pay $150 million is an absolute disgrace. Impossible the US is that stupid to do that. I don't believe it!
 
The Gazelle is not really considered a utility helo, though. It's actually labeled as a light attack and anti-tank helicopter, the latter being its primary mission in the EAF. An upgrade in size to the Dhruv might not necessarily be a bad thing. The Rudra actually looks friggin awesome! Now you know why I was hanging around with you fellas on the IAF thread for the last few years. I knew something like this was bound to happen between India and Egypt except I never actually came out and said it too many times, especially on a Pakistani forum lmfao. :D Good days ahead ISA.

I totally agree with the ball being in the Italian hands. I also think that if it is true, their asking price for the M-346 Arimachi at $50 million a piece is an absolute crazy crack joke. Meaning someone is high on crack in that office putting that price up. I really hope if the EAF goes with the mega deal, it doesn't pay anything remotely close to that crazy *** crackhead number.

Although if the EAF had to supposedly negotiated the Typhoon number from 200 million down to 125 million, it might not be too far fetched for the Italians to put a figure of $50 million on those trainers and a greater possibility the EAF will have negotiated harder for a reduction.



Wuuuuuuut?! Come, on, maaaan! Please give me some source that mentions that crackhead price to the Saudis!? Now that is even crazier than the 50 mill for the M-346 or the 200 mill for the EFT. Even if they were Block 102s with SABR rattling AESA radars and F-35 avionics suite, to ask the Saudis to pay $150 million is an absolute disgrace. Impossible the US is that stupid to do that. I don't believe it!
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We are talking about the pricing of the planes in a way that depends on the number of planes required. The deal for Bulgaria exceeds the price of the plane 200 million dollars

Jordan believes that the price of 8 planes was estimated at 2.1 billion dollars. When I mentioned the number, I mentioned the level of pricing for the plane.

WASHINGTON, April 4, 2022 - The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Bulgaria of F-16 C/D Block 70 Aircraft and related equipment for an estimated cost of $1.673 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale today.


To be compared to aircraft such as the L-15, which has a standard price of $ 15 million, and in the case of requests such as an engine with better thrust capabilities or an AESA radar instead of a PESA radar, the cost of the aircraft will increase to between 20-25 million dollars for the L-15B version, which can carry a payload of up to 4 tons of Thus, the plane becomes good against the Houthi militias and ISIS, for example China presented the aircraft as a competitor to the F-16 at a symbolic price for low-intensity operations that do not face a sophisticated air defense development that poses a threat to the aircraft

Bulgarian deal since last April for F-16 fighters

The Government of Bulgaria has requested to buy four (4) F-16 C Block 70 aircraft; four (4) F-16 D Block 70 aircraft; eleven (11) F100-GE-129D engines (8 installed, 3 spares); eleven (11) Improved Programmable Display Generators (iPDG) (8 installed, 3 spares); eleven (11) AN/APG-83 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) Scalable Agile Beam Radars (SABR) (8 installed, 3 spares); eleven (11) Modular Mission Computers (MMC) 7000AH (8 installed, 3 spares); eleven (11) LN-260 or equivalent Embedded Global Positioning System (GPS) Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) (EGI) with Selective Availability Anti-Spoofing Module (SAASM) and Precise Positioning Service (PPS) (8 installed, 3 spares); nineteen (19) Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) AIM-120C-7/C-8 or equivalent missiles; two (2) AMRAAM Guidance Sections; forty-eight (48) LAU-129A launchers (40 installed, 8 spares); twenty-eight (28) GBU-39/B Small Diameter Bombs (SDBs); two (2) SDB Guided Test Vehicles (GTVs); eleven (11) M61A1 Vulcan Cannons (8 installed, 3 spares); four (4) AN/AAQ-33 Sniper Advanced Targeting Pods (ATPs); twelve (12) Multifunctional Information Distribution System with Joint Tactical Radio Systems (MIDS-JTRS) (aircraft terminals and ground station terminals) (10 installed, 2 spares); twenty (20) AIM-9X Block II missiles; eight (8) AIM-9X Block II Captive Air Training Missiles (CATMs); four (4) AIM-9X Block II Tactical Guidance Units; four (4) AIM-9X Block II CATM Guidance Units; twenty-four (24) FMU-139 or FMU-152 fuze systems; twelve (12) KMU-572 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) Tail Kits for 500LB GBU-38 or Laser JDAM GBU-54; twelve (12) MXU-650 Air Foil Groups (AFGs) for Enhanced Paveway II EGBU-49; twelve (12) MAU-210 Enhanced Computer Control Groups (ECCGs) for EPII EGBU-49; twenty-four (24) MK-82 or BLU-111 or equivalent Bomb Bodies; six (6) MK-82 Inert Bombs; and two (2) GBU-39 SDB I Practice Bombs. Also included are AN/ARC-238 radios; AN/APX-126 or equivalent Advanced Identification Friend or Foe (AIFF) with Combined Interrogator Transponders (CIT); Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System II (JHMCS II) or Scorpion Hybrid Optical-based Inertial Tacker (HObIT) helmet mounted displays; AN/ALQ-254 Viper Shield or equivalent Electronic Warfare (EW) systems; AN/ALE-47 Countermeasure Dispenser Systems (CMDS), KY-58M Cryptographic Devices, KIV-78 Cryptographic Devices, and Simple Key Loaders (SKLs); Joint Mission Planning Systems (JMPS) or equivalent; AIM-120 Captive Air Training Missiles (CATM); PGU-28 High Explosive Incendiary (HEI) ammunition; PGU-27 training rounds (non HEI); ARD-446 impulse cartridges; ARD-863 impulse cartridges; BBU-36/B impulse cartridges; BBU-35/B impulse cartridges; MK-124 smoke flares; MJU-7/B flare cartridges L463 or MJU-53 or equivalent; Common Munitions Built-in-Test (BIT) Reprogramming Equipment (CMBRE); ADU 890 adapter for CMBRE; ADU-891 adapter for CMBRE; Night Vision Devices (NVD); NVD Spare Image Intensifier Tubes; Remote Operated Video Enhanced Receiver (ROVER) 6i units; Tactical Network ROVER Kit; DSU-38 laser sensors for GBU-54; Cartridge Actuated Device/Propellant Actuated Devices (CADs/PADs); GBU-39 tactical training rounds; BRU-57 bomb racks; BRU-61 bomb racks; MAU-12 bomb racks and TER-9A triple ejection racks; other chaff and flare, ammunition, and pylons; launcher adaptors and weapons interfaces; fuel tanks and attached hardware; travel pods; aircraft and weapons integration, test, and support equipment; electronic warfare database and mission data file development; precision measurement and calibration laboratory equipment; secure communications; cryptographic equipment; precision navigation equipment; aircraft and personnel support and test equipment; spare and repair parts; repair and return services; maps, publications, and technical documentation; studies and surveys; classified/unclassified software and software support; personnel training and training equipment; facilities and facility management, design and/or construction services; U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistical and program support. The estimated total cost is $1.673 billion.


This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security objectives of the United States by helping to improve the security of a NATO ally that is a force for political stability and economic progress in Europe.


The proposed sale will improve Bulgaria’s capability to meet current and future threats by enabling the Bulgarian Air Force to deploy modern fighter aircraft routinely in the Black Sea region. The acquisition of these aircraft would provide Bulgaria a NATO interoperable platform and allow the Bulgarian Air Force to operate more frequently alongside other regional F-16 operators, promoting common doctrine and operations. Bulgaria has shown a commitment to modernizing its armed forces and will have no difficulty absorbing these aircraft and services into its armed forces.


The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.


The principal contractor will be Lockheed Martin, Greenville, South Carolina. There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.


Implementation of this proposed sale will require the assignment of U.S. contractor representatives (fewer than 20) to Bulgaria for a duration of thirty-six (36) months to support secure storage requirements of critically controlled assets and provide on-site contractor logistics support.


There will be no adverse impact on U.S. defense readiness as a result of this proposed sale.


This notice of a potential sale is required by law. The description and dollar value is for the highest estimated quantity and dollar value based on initial requirements. Actual dollar value will be lower depending on final requirements, budget authority, and signed sales agreement(s), if and when concluded.


All questions regarding this proposed Foreign Military Sale should be directed to the State Department's Bureau of Political Military Affairs, Office of Congressional and Public Affairs, pm-cpa@state.gov.
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Jordan believes that the price of 8 planes was estimated at 2.1 billion dollars. When I mentioned the number, I mentioned the level of pricing for the plane.

That's insane because the baseline price for the F-16 block 70 is $64 million.

$64 million

Lockheed Martin F-16 Block 70/72: $64 million (Image: Lockheed Martin) The F-16 was created as a light and maneuverable fighter jet that would offer an affordable alternative to the F-15.

10. Lockheed Martin F-16 Block 70/72: $64 million​

F-16 Block 70

(Image: Lockheed Martin)

The F-16 was created as a light and maneuverable fighter jet that would offer an affordable alternative to the F-15. Its older variants cost roughly $30 million apiece – cheaper than the vast majority of contemporary fighters – but the most advanced ones are really quite pricey.

The Block 70 and 72 configurations include much of the upgrades intended for the F-16V, and most likely are very similar to the F-21, a jet Lockheed Martin has offered to India. While we may never know the price of the F-21 or the F-16V, the cost of a single F-16 Block 70 gives an insight into how much a top-of-the-line jet, based on the venerable F-16 airframe, may cost.

Source.

This is from the top 10 most expensive fighters. Of course baseline price is typically lower than export cost, but the difference between $64 million and $150 million is off the charts lol. The US obviously has the best technology out there, without a question and I don't think anyone can argue that. Which then makes it overreach when pricing for foreign contracts and they probably tried to rip off the Saudis but I'm sure the Saudis, despite being blessed with incredible wealth are certainly not stupid and with Biden in office will be even more resistant to US ripping off.
 
Wuuuuuuut?! Come, on, maaaan! Please give me some source that mentions that crackhead price to the Saudis!? Now that is even crazier than the 50 mill for the M-346 or the 200 mill for the EFT. Even if they were Block 102s with SABR rattling AESA radars and F-35 avionics suite, to ask the Saudis to pay $150 million is an absolute disgrace. Impossible the US is that stupid to do that. I don't believe it!
Well saudis dont really care
Thats why their negotiations dont last long
 
That's insane because the baseline price for the F-16 block 70 is $64 million.

$64 million

Lockheed Martin F-16 Block 70/72: $64 million (Image: Lockheed Martin) The F-16 was created as a light and maneuverable fighter jet that would offer an affordable alternative to the F-15.

10. Lockheed Martin F-16 Block 70/72: $64 million​

F-16 Block 70

(Image: Lockheed Martin)

The F-16 was created as a light and maneuverable fighter jet that would offer an affordable alternative to the F-15. Its older variants cost roughly $30 million apiece – cheaper than the vast majority of contemporary fighters – but the most advanced ones are really quite pricey.

The Block 70 and 72 configurations include much of the upgrades intended for the F-16V, and most likely are very similar to the F-21, a jet Lockheed Martin has offered to India. While we may never know the price of the F-21 or the F-16V, the cost of a single F-16 Block 70 gives an insight into how much a top-of-the-line jet, based on the venerable F-16 airframe, may cost.

Source.

This is from the top 10 most expensive fighters. Of course baseline price is typically lower than export cost, but the difference between $64 million and $150 million is off the charts lol. The US obviously has the best technology out there, without a question and I don't think anyone can argue that. Which then makes it overreach when pricing for foreign contracts and they probably tried to rip off the Saudis but I'm sure the Saudis, despite being blessed with incredible wealth are certainly not stupid and with Biden in office will be even more resistant to US ripping off.

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Any fighter deal does not just buy a plane, but buys the training program and spare parts, other than the price of ammunition, and the deal is one. You will not find anyone who buys fighters only, but to replace the crash of a plane that was purchased beforehand, ammunition and spare parts, and the training program. The numbers that launch such as 65 million dollars for the F-16V are not on the ground Or real, because the deals are clear, like the Jordan deal or the Bulgaria deal

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When South Korea announces that the price of the KF-21 is 65 million dollars, it does not mean that deals are expected in the price. F-35 150 million dollars, which is very simply, the numbers called the prices of planes are not the actual sales numbers

Countries such as India and China have a large production of equipment and a bulletin in large numbers, and the low cost of global research is reflected in the prices of fighters

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IAF will get an LCA Trainer by 2023, while an LCA LIFT Flying Testbed is scheduled for 2025​


Hindustan Aeronautics Limited has already begun producing LCA Tejas Trainer aircraft in FOC mode; the first batch of 4 aircraft will be delivered this year, and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited aims to finish delivering 14 additional aircraft by the end of 2023. IAF had ordered 4 LCA Trainers in IOC configuration and 14 Trainers in FOC configuration in three batches, but all 18 will be in the chosen final configuration.
The launch of LCA LIFT, which will be utilised for demonstration and trials to suit the requirements of the Indian Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force, Egyptian Air Force, and even Malaysia, may occur sometime in late 2025. LCA LIFT will be based on the LCA Trainer aircraft.

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In order to satisfy Malaysia’s requirements for its tender for 18 light combat jets, 10 Tejas Mk1A and 8 LCA trainer aircraft have been offered. According to Malaysian media reports, the tender winner is anticipated to be announced by the end of August, and the contract may be signed in the middle of 2023. The first batch of LCA Trainer will be delivered by HAL starting in 2026, while ten Tejas Mk1A will be delivered by 2028. HAL claims to be the front-runner in the Malaysian tender.
If the Malaysian order is finished before the end of the year, plans have been made to switch some of the IAF orders to the HAL plant in Nasik. The last two LCA Trainer that the IAF had bought to serve as a flying test bed for the LCA LIFT programme may be put on hold by the IAF and HAL. LCA Trainer and LCA LIFT will have various enhancements because they will be used to provide advanced instruction to new pilots, whilst LCA Trainer will be similar to the single seater form.

 

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