• Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Positive vibes Pakistan

Discussion in 'Social & Current Events' started by Lone Shooter, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. Sulman Badshah

    Sulman Badshah SENIOR MEMBER

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    Pakistan Claims First Prize at the One Young World Dublin
    Pakistan has won first prize at the Rwanga Social Startup Competition, which was held at the fifth One Young World summit in Dublin.

    Khizr Imran Tajammul represented Pakistan and presented his idea for researching and manufacturing affordable energy solutions for low income communities. His idea taps into the potential of solar energy in Pakistan and helps make solar energy solutions more accessible to the lowest common denominator.

    According to Tajammul, solar water heating has great potential in a country like Pakistan. Greenhouse technology as opposed to evacuation tubes (used in most conventional solar water heaters) can prove more efficient and affordable and therefore has potential for fast adoption across the country.

    Tajammul has established an organization with his friends, ‘Jaan Pakistan’, to launch support and further explore this initiative. As prize money, Jaan Pakistan has received USD 20,000 which will help with the organization’s plans to venture into prototype development at the end of 2014. Jaan Pakistan is also collaborating with international manufacturers and technology giants to fine tune the design for their first product – the solar water heater.

    One Young World, established in 2009, is a UK-based not-for-profit organization that helps bring together the brightest young people across the world together and empowers them to make lasting connections to create positive change.

    This year the conference was attended by a series of established global leaders such as Kofi Annan, Mary Robinson, Sir Bob Geldof, Professor Muhammad Yunus, Paul Polman, Doug Richard, Jimmy Wales, Former Latin American Presidents, Sol Campbell, Dame Ellen MacArthur, Martin Pollock, Hans Reitz, Professor Meghan ‘O Sullivan and Meghan Markle.
     
  2. Sulman Badshah

    Sulman Badshah SENIOR MEMBER

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    [​IMG]
    Conquering the world with their documentaries, campaigns and cartoons, four Pakistani women have made it to BBC’s 100 Women list.

    Among BBC’s 100 women are documentary film-maker and Oscar award winner Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy, Internet rights activist Sana Saleem, filmmaker and campaigner Sarah Khan and cartoonist Nigar Nazar.

    Nigar Nazar

    [​IMG]PHOTO: CARTOONNEWS.BLOGSPOT.COM

    The first Pakistani female cartoonist, Nigar Nazar is Gogi Studios’ mastermind and lead cartoonist. A subtle, bilingual (available in English and Urdu) commentary on local gender issues, these comics are an important part of an emotive venture. From raising awareness to childhood development to a life of poverty to education and environmental degradation, Gogi covers a gamut of our society’s positives and pitfalls.

    Sana Saleem
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    PHOTO: TWITTER

    Internet rights activist, Sana Saleem is the director of the Bolo Bhi non-profit group that advocates free speech.

    She is also the co-founder of Stories Beyond Borders, a crowd-sourced storytelling platform connecting personal stories for advocacy and policy change.

    Sarah Khan[​IMG]
    EXPRESS NEWS SCREENGRAB

    A Pakistani Briton, Sarah Khan is a woman rights activist and filmmaker is the director of Inspire – a human rights organisation and has actively campaigned for women’s rights within Muslim communities for over 18 years.

    Emphasising on the need to invest more in women, Khan said female participation is always fruitful for a society.

    Sharmeen Obaid-Chino

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    PHOTO: REUTERS

    Lauded as Pakistan’s first Oscar winner, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy was awarded the Hilal-e-Imtiaz for her documentary Saving Face.

    Empowering women and bringing their plight to the forefront through her documentaries, Obaid-Chinoy won as Academy Award winning film for her short documentary titled Humaira: The Dream Catcher.

    Two-time Emmy winner, the film-maker received two Emmy Awards for the Best Documentary and Outstanding Editing: Documentary and Long Form categories in 2013 and also the accolade in the Current Affairs category for her documentary Children of the Taliban in 2010.


    Source: Four Pakistanis listed in BBC'S 100 Women
     
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  3. Sulman Badshah

    Sulman Badshah SENIOR MEMBER

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    First Pakistani receives Prince of Asturias Award

    Broadcast journalist and documentary filmmaker Shehzad Hameed Ahmad from Pakistan has won the Prince of Asturias Award — Spain's equivalent of the Nobel Peace Prize — for his work during Fulbright scholarship which also included a documentary 'The Pakistan Four'.

    Ahmad received the award from the Spain's King Felipe Juan on behalf of the Fulbright Global Program for International Cooperation.

    Nelson Mandela, the revered icon of the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa, had also been a recipient of the Prince of Asturias Award in 1992.



    [​IMG]Shehzad Hameed Ahmad (third from right) poses for a group photo during the Prince of Asturias Award ceremony in Oviedo, Spain. — Courtesy photo/Shehzad Hameed Ahmad


    Ahmad's documentary was also the recipient of the best documentary award at the Indiana Short Film Festival 2014. The film is in the running at the Seattle South Asian Film Festival as well.

    The Seattle South Film Festival would also see other Pakistani films 'Anima State' and 'Without Shepherds' tying for an award.

    The Prince of Asturias Foundation has been convening the Prince of Asturias Awards since 1981. The awards are presented at an academic ceremony held each year in Oviedo, the capital of the Principality of Asturias.

    The aim of the foundation is to consolidate the existing links between the Principality and the person who bears the title of Prince or Princess of Asturias — a title which corresponds to the heir to the Spanish throne — and to contribute to promoting the scientific, cultural and humanistic values that form part of mankind's universal heritage

    The Pakistan Four - Documentary Teaser from Shehzad Hameed Ahmad on Vimeo
     
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  4. Sulman Badshah

    Sulman Badshah SENIOR MEMBER

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    Saad Haroon, first runner up in Funniest Person in the World competition
    [​IMG]
    Pakistani Comedian Saad Haroon was the first runner up with 59,213 votes in the Funniest Person in the World competition won by stand-up comic from Finland, Ismo Leikola with 158,945 votes.

    Haroon is a founding member of the Pakistani improv group Blackfish and other comedy troupe and creator of English-language Pakistani show “The Real News,” a mix of political and social satire.

    “Countries don’t owe money to each other, countries owe money to banks,” says Ismo Leikola. “If the countries owe money to banks how stupid are the countries to pay. Like the country has an army. The bank has four cashiers and a cleaning lady.”

    When Leikola told that joke in the semifinal round of the competition last week at the Laugh Factory in Hollywood it got the biggest laugh of the night.

    From there the Finnish comedian bankrolled himself to victory at Friday night’s final round, a five-comic showdown at the Laugh Factory in Las Vegas. The competition was streamed over the Internet.

    Mustapha El Atrassi of France was third, Nitin Mirani of United Arab Emirates was fourth and Archie Bezos of Spain was fifth.

    Leikola wins $10,000 and a national comedy tour.

    The competition was the brainchild of Laugh Factory owner Jamie Masada, who plans to make it an annual event. He said he hopes it can show the world that if people from different countries laugh together they can set aside other differences.

    Dozens of comics from around the world entered. Online voters narrowed the competition to 10 semifinalists, then five finalists before the final showdown in Las Vegas.
     
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  5. Syed.Ali.Haider

    Syed.Ali.Haider ELITE MEMBER

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    Inspired by Pakistan - Pakistan - DAWN.COM

    Inspired by Pakistan
    Maliha Mansoor
    Updated about 5 hours ago
    [​IMG]
    Photo courtesy: Iara Lee Facebook page
    Born to Korean parents and raised in Brazil, activist and film maker Iara Lee has a love affair with Pakistan — in part because Pakistan provoked her to channel her passions of art and culture into “something beyond art and culture.”

    “I used to run an international film festival in Brazil,” says Lee. “Then somewhere along the way, I realised that it wasn’t enough. Art and culture has always been an essential part of me, but as I grew up, I realised we need to utilise art and culture for something ‘beyond’ art and culture.”

    Lee left Brazil in 1989 for the United States (US) to pursue further studies and with a penchant to ‘see and explore the world at large’. In America, Lee ran Caipirinha Productions, a media company to explore how different art forms could better synergise for the purposes of storytelling and social justice.

    In 2000 Lee landed in Pakistan to visit and film an Afghan refugee camp in Peshawar. She had been to the region before for other projects, but this visit turned into a life-changing trip.

    Activist and film-maker Iara Lee found her calling while visiting a refugee camp in Peshawar
    “We were in this refugee camp where I wanted to focus on the plight of Afghan women and children when people started pelting stones at us and shouting. I heard an old man cry that every day, scores of media personnel arrive to cover them but nothing changes.”

    [​IMG]
    At Hopper Glacier, Hunza
    Lee realised that the man was right.

    “I felt that more needed to be done; something beyond merely reporting corruption, oppression and injustice; to report the plight in such a manner so as to bring about a positive change in the life of sufferers. I felt we needed to bring about a change, make a difference and so the documentary Cultures of Resistance was transformed into an organisation, the Cultures of Resistance Network.”

    In Lee’s words, the Cultures of Resistance Network is all about ‘creativity with a cause.’ The organisation “endeavours to raise a voice, condemn and inspire people to fight against corruption, oppression and injustice in all its forms and to promote peace and justice through non-violent action and the creative dimension of cultures. To this end, CoR connects and supports activists, agitators, educators and artists all across the globe. In Pakistan, CoR has been actively pursuing its cause through Khubaib Foundation, Kalash People’s Development Network, Muhammad Ibrahim Memorial Society and Dawood Global Foundation.

    “I especially like to focus on young people, who I feel are the future. I like to engage them, encourage them to step forward and take the command of their life in their own hands,” Lee says.

    Much of the idea for the organisation, as Lee confesses, initially began as the documentary film: Cultures of Resistance was meant to explore the contours of how creative action contributes to conflict prevention and resolution around the world. The documentary was to encompass injustice inflicted in different parts of the world, from Iraq to Iran to Tunisia to Syria to Africa to Gaza to Lebanon and other places.

    But as things progressed, Lee realised how other people and humanitarian organisations (Amnesty International, Green Peace) merged together in a global network and pursued the same cause. The commitment is endless; and not without its toll undoubtedly. This was a workable blueprint.

    “My biggest concern regarding the Cultures of Resistance Network is its finances, of course, since we do not collect monetary donations. I have to keep the resources flowing by working all year long as well as investing in technology and renewable energy,” she says.

    [​IMG]
    Iara with a group of children at Shigar Fort
    Though Lee confesses to really putting her head down and generating enough resources to run the Cultures of Resistance Network, she loves the independence it brings: “I am my own boss and it’s a wonderful feeling of creative independence! There’s no one to tell me to make a film with a certain perspective or edit it down with a specific slant.”

    But besides the flow of finances, Lee also concedes there are other impediments along the way; and of a much graver nature! “I’ve been detained in the ‘terrorist room’ by the US authorities who came up with all sorts of stupid questions like ‘What’s your religion?’ etc. I told them that I am not a Muslim but I do have a lot of Muslims friends, and no I am not with al-Qaeda, but yes, I am dead against Israeli occupation and aggression in Gaza. The main reason I left the US was when they invaded Iraq and then left the country wounded and bleeding; in a much worse state.

    “I have also met with a lot of resistance from other governments as well like when I was working for the poor people of Sahara Desert in Western Morocco. I have been physically present in a ship which was attacked by Israel and I thought to myself: ‘maybe this is the end for me.’

    “I had been through a lot of tough situations, and my work does involve a lot of stress and struggle, but nothing would stop me from being curious, getting to the core of things first hand, being active and contributing in my own humble way to make this world a better place; even if it is in a very small ratio.”

    Her love affair with Pakistan has brought her to the country several times now. This particular visit of hers involved making a documentary on the K2 and the amazing Kalash people. Speaking of her ventures and experiences in the country, she says, “For a person like me, who has been travelling across the globe, Pakistan is one fascinating country. The cultural diversity in this country is mind boggling; from the traditional to the contemporary to the different linguistic and ethnic sects, it really is wide-ranged. Yes, with time things may have become a bit more complicated, especially for foreigners, but I definitely don’t think it is a monster country, full of terrorists, as projected by the Western media — a crazy country where nothing works.

    “What has really captured me about Pakistan is the kindness of the people here; really they are so generous and hospitable with such magnanimous hearts which is even beyond the Arab world.

    “My experience of Pakistani hospitality deepened even more when I went up north for my documentary on K2. People there are so pure and innocent and so helpful to tourists.

    “I would also like to comment on the expertise and skill of the local trekkers who provide guidance to the foreign mountaineers: They are incredible people in an amazing place; they are so under privileged and underpaid but the risks they take in their profession, brace the impacts and with such genuine passion that it is really commendable.”

    And what about some of the problems she might have faced here, I ask.

    “I wouldn’t call them problems really; they are more like challenges,” says Lee. “One thing that I could not help but notice is the deep rooted family traditions which even the modern new generation adhere to still. I mean I cannot understand how young people can get married in an arranged way and not out of love!

    “Also the political situation here is so unpredictable. There’s a palpable tension in the air — what’s going to happen? When? How? I call it nonstop excitement in Pakistan, for better or worse, I can’t say, but it is undeniably exciting! I think it is one of the most happening places in the world!”

    Before we wrap up, I have two more questions for her. Lee has Korean lineage, was raised in Brazil, then studied and worked in the United States, and then trotted the globe on her journey for social justice. But which nationality or country does she really identify with as her native own?

    “Yes all that is true; maybe I am a Palestinian woman at heart, but gradually becoming very Pakistani, as I spend more time here in your lovely country.”

    Finally, my last question: How is it possible for a woman to trek such an absorbing pursuit and have a normal family life too? She takes a moment to let the words absorb but then answers simply yet very conclusively.

    “You and many people around the world noticed I have no conventional family comprising husband, children, time to chit chat with friends and regular leisure time. But a life can take on other dimensions and I have consciously chosen a rather unconventional path.

    “Many years ago I, realised we can only do so much and in life we need to make choices as there is no such a thing as ‘having it all’. So I decided that instead of having biological children, I would devote time to orphans from war-torn countries, youth from refugee camps or IDPs, kids from underprivileged societies.

    “Children are so defenceless, they come to this world many times as product of parents’ irresponsibility or lack of planning and they suffer the consequences of being neglected or exploited. I feel for these children and truly resent that they become victims of abusive adults.

    “For now, and forever, this is it for me. The Cultures of Resistance Network is my whole life and I intend to live it till the last of my breath.”

    Published in Dawn, Sunday Magazine, November 9th, 2014
     
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  6. Sulman Badshah

    Sulman Badshah SENIOR MEMBER

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  7. Sulman Badshah

    Sulman Badshah SENIOR MEMBER

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    10403348_10203822972948871_1039598762443656066_n.jpg
     
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  8. Sulman Badshah

    Sulman Badshah SENIOR MEMBER

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  9. Syed.Ali.Haider

    Syed.Ali.Haider ELITE MEMBER

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  10. Sulman Badshah

    Sulman Badshah SENIOR MEMBER

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    THE BACKSTORY
    Our story begins in the year 2010 in a small village of district Okara, Pakistan, the birthplace of our founders Waqas and Sidra. Where they met with Hussain, a local, who made handmade leather shoes in a small workshop for a living. On visiting the workshop, they felt so proud and intrigued to see the work of the small group of talented craftsmen.

    But everything was not going well. They learned that Hussain’s craft as well as other shoemakers in the region were at the risk of extinction because of the lack of essential resources and demand in the local market - all the consequence of mass production. Waqas left his college and Sidra had to shrug off the traditional gender biases in the society to work towards turning this craft into a world renowned brand. They were determined to make this craft known to the world.

    Since then there has been no looking back. After making and selling shoes in small quantities around the globe, and facing many successes and numerous failures, the team decided to launch Markhor with the help of backers from Kickstarter.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  11. ghazi52

    ghazi52 ELITE MEMBER

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    Sindh brings out its colours on 'Ajrak-Topi' day
    8th December 2014

    Clad in Sindhi traditional costumes, humming Sindhi folk songs and dancing to drum beats, the old, the young, the youth and the elderly men and women poured onto streets across the province to celebrate Sindh culture day.

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    Snake charmers take part in a rally on Sindhi Topi Ajrak Day. —ONLINE
    [​IMG]
    Girls in traditional Sindhi dresses, present a tableau during a ceremony outside Karachi Press Club. — ONLINE
    [​IMG]
    People celebrate Sindhi Topi Ajrak Day, in Dera Allah Yar. — ONLINE
    Women dance on traditional Sindhi songs to celebrate Sindhi Topi Ajrak Day outside Karachi Press Club.— ONLINE
    [​IMG]
    People dance on traditional Sindhi songs on Sindhi Topi Ajrak Day. — ONLINE
    [​IMG]
    People dance on traditional Sindhi songs on Sindhi Topi Ajrak Day. — ONLINE
    [​IMG]
    A car decorated with the Sindhi topi. — ONLINE
    [​IMG]
    Students present a tableau.— ONLINE
    [​IMG]
    Children wear traditional Ajrak and Sindhi caps.— ONLINE

    [​IMG]
    Students dance on Sindhi folk music during Sindhi Cultural Week at a school in Hyderabad. — ONLINE
    [​IMG]
    Students pose for a group photo
     
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  12. CHARGER

    CHARGER FULL MEMBER

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  13. Sulman Badshah

    Sulman Badshah SENIOR MEMBER

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  14. Al Bhatti

    Al Bhatti SENIOR MEMBER

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    December 15, 2014

    [​IMG]
    Pakistani gym owner Bashir Ahmad watches as young boxers take part in a training session at a gym in Lahore. In a dingy gym tucked away in a dim basement in Pakistan's eastern city of Lahore, pumped up teens get to grips with jujitsu moves before unleashing volleys of ferocious punches.

    [​IMG]
    Pakistani gym owner Bashir Ahmad.

    Pakistan’s Fight Club emerges from shadows
    There are around 500 diehard fighters that practise this extreme sport

    In a dingy gym tucked away in a basement in Pakistan’s eastern city of Lahore, pumped up teens get to grips with ju-jitsu moves before unleashing volleys of ferocious punches.

    Some dream of following in the footsteps of Bruce Lee and Muhammad Ali, but others idolise the gym’s owner Bashir Ahmad, the first Pakistani mixed martial arts (MMA) fighter on the world stage.

    With its exciting blend of wrestling and boxing, MMA is fast becoming a worldwide phenomenon. Events attract thousands of spectators and millions more tune in to watch their muscled heroes battle it out on TV or over live internet streams.

    In Pakistan there are around 500 diehard fighters that practise this extreme sport, which stands in marked contrast to the country’s more sedate pastimes such as cricket, with its breaks for afternoon tea.

    Today Bashir watches as youths — some lean and sinewy, others muscular, trade blows as onlookers scream: “We want blood! We want blood!”

    Dawood Shahid, who at 12 years old already packs a mean uppercut, says he used to watch American WWE wrestling on TV for many years before switching over to MMA.

    “WWE is made up, MMA is the real thing,” he says after his friendly bout.

    In Pakistan, MMA is growing under the watchful eyes of a close-knit circle that surrounds Bashir.

    Short but tough and built like an ox, the Pakistani-American former soldier served with the US Army in Iraq before devoting himself to martial arts, taking an MMA course in Thailand where he took part in his first amateur bouts under the name “Somchai”, meaning “man” in Thai.

    In 2009, the 32 year old returned to Pakistan, opened his own gym and began to organise “extreme combat” in metal cages, sowing the seeds of an underground scene.

    Last year the Asian championship ONE, the MMA’s de facto second division behind the US Ultimate Fighting Championship with its millionaire stars like Canadian George St-Pierre, approached Bashir for a fight in Singapore, which he won.

    Pakistan had found its first MMA victor.

    That success energised young fans of the sport in Pakistan but had relatively little impact on the rest of the country, which remains in love with cricket and to a lesser extent traditional wrestling.

    But unlike Brad Pitt in the cult hit Fight Club, whose first rule was never to speak of Fight Club, MMA adherents are trying hard to emerge from the shadows.

    “Last year, I kept on travelling to different TV channels to say ‘Hey I have a good idea, I have good fighters, I have a ring, I have this and that, the whole team, why we don’t put a show on?’ But they replied ‘What is it? Is it cricket?’” said Sheikh Sultan Shahid, an MMA promoter.

    In Bashir Ahmad’s gym, youths from rundown neighbourhoods square up to to others from a posh suburb of Lahore who pay $50 a month for training, bringing together two different worlds in this highly class-oriented society.

    The son of a cleric from a poor family, Abdul Rafique, 19, gets a $10 a week stipend from the proprietor of a gym, who sees in him the making of a future warrior.

    “I come from a poor family and I joined it because I am studying as a sportsman and getting a scholarship and also being trained for MMA. I really like MMA, I want to fight with all my heart and soul,” said Rafique.

    In conservative Muslim Pakistan, apprentice fighters have limited exposure to martial arts and are taught to avoid hitting the face, which is considered forbidden in certain sects of Islam — though it doesn’t prevent the neighbourhood mullah from praying for the fighters’ protection.

    And though some dream of the octagonal cages of Asia and America, the more well-off fighters are more reluctant to think of the sport in professional terms.

    Harris Butt, a medical student with rock solid biceps and abs, recently got his first offer to fight abroad, but his mother didn’t allow him. After all, she said, better to be a doctor than a patient after a fight.

    Pakistan has battled an Islamist insurgency for more than a decade, and its stuttering economy is plagued by power blackouts, joblessness and high poverty — frustrations that may create the breeding ground in which combat sports like MMA could thrive one day.

    For now, this Fight Club remains confined to a handful of poor fighters and some who can afford to pay up to $100 a month in a smattering of gyms.

    Mohammad Abdullah, a young MMA convert, is in no doubt about what is holding it back.

    “If MMA moves into the open in Pakistan, you will see what good fighters we are.”

    Pakistan’s Fight Club emerges from shadows | GulfNews.com
     
  15. PakGuns

    PakGuns FULL MEMBER

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    Pak wheels tourist department is full of explorers and adventurers .. I love the work of Mubin, who's also owner of pal.com..
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2014
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