Why America is hated in the Middle-east?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by A.Rahman, Aug 16, 2006.

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  1. Aspahbod
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    Aspahbod FULL MEMBER

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    The real problem is you think you have chosen to spread freedom. I'm not sure you're free yourselves. I don't mean that you don't have a free elections or something like that. But your minds are not free. They are enslaved. As many other people all around the world. I'm not anti-american and I really hate my crazy government. But your politicians are not even a little clear to you. There are many secrets most people don't know. to understand it better, search Freemasonry in google.
  2. Parashuram1
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    Parashuram1 FULL MEMBER

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    I think there are a few reasons that have kept both sides at loggerheads:

    1) American government's misunderstanding of the region

    2) Extremist culture in the Middle East; religious law governing countries is sometimes misused

    3) Rash actions by American government despite chances of discussion; Iraq war an example;

    4) Fundamentalists too powerful in Middle East and their narrow-mindedness causes frictions

    5) Arab/regional obsession with Israel/Zionism

    6) Culture shock between the two countries;


    I won't say Americans are hated because practically everything related to technology has some or the other American origin; cars of Saudi are mostly American made for example.

    It is a Love-Hate relationship which needs careful thinking.
  3. somebozo
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    somebozo ELITE MEMBER

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    Due to its double standards.
    Supporting corrupt royal families while talking about democracy.
    Supporting israel.
  4. mikkix
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    mikkix FULL MEMBER

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    Me is responsible for what they done..
    because they don't want to do anything but waiting for one to do something for them...
    Illiteracy, ignorant, proud and hatred destroying them...
  5. ejaz007
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    ejaz007 SENIOR MEMBER

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    US embassy vehicle runs over student

    * The bereaved family pressed not to charge American driver in return of compensation
    * Police let killer drive off in the vehicle that struck motorcyclist dead


    Staff Report

    ISLAMABAD: A 21-year-old motorcyclist Jawadur Rehman, a resident of G-7/4, was crushed to death by a speeding vehicle, driven by a US citizen and employee of the US Embassy in Islamabad, on Saturday night.

    Jackson, who is in his late 30s, was driving a Toyota Lexus when he hit the motorcycle of Rehman bearing registration No STR- 6500 on 7th Avenue near F 7/2. Rehman, a student at a local private college, received head injuries and was pronounced dead on the spot. Police moved his body to Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS).

    Aabpara police claim that they have registered a case against the driver for reckless driving resulting in death of the youngster, but no FIR report was shown to Daily Times, even after consistent insistence. Instead of arresting the driver - a US citizen - police received directives from the high-ups of Foreign Office and Ministry of Interior to not only let the accused driver go but also take his car with him, informed the police sources seeking anonymity.

    "In any routine case, we would have arrested the accused and impounded his car as a case property and would not have let him go without presenting him before a court of law, but owing to pressures exerted from the high-ups and involvement of a US citizen that too from US Embassy, we had to let the driver go with his vehicle," said the officials at the police station. However, a duty official told Daily Times they are waiting for the next orders from their higher-ups to sort out the situation.

    Sources claimed that police officials have approached the family of the deceased not to press charges against the driver and instead receive some compensation under Qisas-Dayat- an Islamic injunction to forgive the murderer in lieu of financial compensation. Police have been asked to bring the family members of the deceased to the US Embassy inside Diplomatic Enclave in the morning so that amount of compensation could be ascertained, added the sources.

    The deceased hails from a working class family and is son of an IESCO employee Saifur Rehman. He has three brothers and three sisters in the family and was the youngest of them all. Family of the deceased belongs to timber-land Dargai, a remote area in Malakand division, formerly Malakand Agency, situated on Peshawar-Swat road.

    Talking to Daily Times, the family members of the deceased informed that they have already buried the body of Rehman in H-11 graveyard and are now waiting for the Police to proceed with the case. They, however, said that police officials were pressurizing them not to press charges against the accused, rather should wait for the police to help them secure some money in compensation.

    Official spokesperson of US Embassy confirmed that "a US embassy vehicle was involved in a road accident late on Saturday night. The vehicle was driven by a US embassy employee who also happens to be an American." He, however, avoided confirming the status of the accused driver as diplomat or his name by saying that "We are cooperating with the police in their investigations."

    Daily Times - Leading News Resource of Pakistan
  6. Parashuram1
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    Oh dear God! This is a terrible accident. I am stunned why the officials not arrest this person immediately. The driver should be immediately charged for the case and since he was 'let off' to continue driving, the charges must be extended to the officers who let this happen as well.

    The Pakistani family has a full right to claim damages as well as get the driver arrested and behind bars. May the young man's soul rest in peace.
  7. ejaz007
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    US Embassy set to put Rs 600,000 damper on killing
    Staff Report

    ISLAMABAD:US Embassy officials have offered Rs 600,000 to relatives of deceased Jawadur Rehman, who was crushed to death by a speeding vehicle, driven by a US citizen and employee of the US Embassy, on Sunday, learned Daily Times from reliable sources.

    Tyre Jackson, who is in his late 30s, was driving a Toyota Lexus No 6300 when he hit the motorcycle of Rehman on 7th Avenue near F 7/3. Rehman, 21, a student at a local private college, received head injuries and was pronounced dead on the spot.

    Sources said that police officials and Babar, a Pakistani employee at US Embassy, have approached the bereaved family and requested them not to press charges against the driver and instead receive some compensation under Qisas-Dayat - an Islamic injunction to forgive the murderer in lieu of financial compensation.

    On Monday, police took Saifur Rehman, father of the deceased, to the US Embassy located in Diplomatic Enclave, where once again Babar met him and told that he has bargained with the high-ups of the Embassy and got an approval to give Rs. 600,000 as compensation.

    Talking to Daily Times, family members of the deceased said that they have told Babar that they will discuss the 'offer' at home. They also said that police officials were pressurizing them not to press charges against the accused and accept the compensation without any delay.

    Aabpara police registered a First Information Report (FIR) Vide No 231 under section 320, 279 and 427 against the driver for reckless driving resulting in death of the youngster. Instead of arresting the driver - a US citizen - police received directives from the high-ups of Foreign Office and Ministry of Interior to not only let the accused driver go but also take his car with him, said the police sources seeking anonymity.

    Daily Times - Leading News Resource of Pakistan
  8. shaka_shaka
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    why the middle east the muslim world hates the US

    first thing ( muslims in the subcontinent ), many dont actually hate the US, US has replaced the british empire as their new MASTER, people of subcontinent have a history of being enslaved in known history, this indus valley civilization never went out to invade anyone, they were always invaded and of course conquered.

    most of those who hate the US have religious reasons. simple.
    having united states army stationed around the holiest places of islam, makkah and madina, a fact which many muslims are unaware of is enough to start the hate

    second. of course, support for isreal

    in the arab world, many people are deeply impressed and want to adopt the american way of life, which means when bush said the war is about preserving american way of life, he was pointing out here

    now those who pose a threat to the american way of life are fundamentalist muslims.

    there are a lot of fundamentalist muslims of course in the middle east who propagate this hate. the us can not bom each and every such house in the middle east to stop the hate

    it seems highly unlikely from where i view this that the overwhelming population in the muslim world would start hating america any time soon, which would of course have negative consequences for the US

    plus all of the middle east is a police state and the growing love for american culture only supplements to the power of these regimes

    the fundamentalists have the most potent weapon which can exploit any muslims feelings, RELIGION

    whatever the US does, the US can not wipe out a whole religion

    so there is NO way, US can hold a good standing in the eyes of muslims, ever
  9. LegionnairE
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    LegionnairE SENIOR MEMBER

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    Read this And this

    And this is how US troops treat to locals


    Non of American troops has balls to walk in crowded areas like bazaars in Afghanistan or Iraq, since they dont have ties with local people they can never succeed in the area

    I been hearing from people that Turkish troops in Kabul were always walking with candies in their pockets/combat vests to to give childeren

    Thats why Turkey didnt lose a single soldier in Afghanistan. Hope they learn something from our soldiers...
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  10. ejaz007
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    US Embassy offers Rs 2m, job to brother of deceased

    ISLAMABAD: The US Embassy has offered Rs 2 million compensation to the family of deceased Jawaur Rehman and Rs 50,000 per month job to his brother in the Embassy, sources told Daily Times on Tuesday. Jawadur Rehman was allegedly crushed to death by a speeding vehicle, being driven by a US citizen and employee of the US Embassy in Islamabad, on Sunday. The police high-ups have instructed the investigation officer and relatives of Jawadur Rehman to switch off their cell phones till finalisation of the US Embassy deal with the parents of Jawad, the sources added. The US Embassy officials met Saifur Rehman, father of the deceased, on Monday and offered Rs 600,000 as compensation. They again contacted him on Tuesday and offered him Rs 2 million as compensation. They told him that the Embassy had also decided to appoint Jawad’s brother (any one out of three) in the Embassy against Rs 50,000 per month salary, said the sources. staff report

    Daily Times - Leading News Resource of Pakistan
  11. Chinaownseverything
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  12. Chinaownseverything
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    [​IMG]

    A good chart detailing the CIA atrocities in South America
  13. ejaz007
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    28 Afghan civilians killed in US airstrike
    Updated at: 1125 PST, Thursday, August 05, 2010

    KABUL: Dozens of civilians have been killed and several others injured in Afghanistan after US warplanes bombarded the country's east, according to witnesses.

    The American forces launched two airstrikes in Nangarhar province on Thursday morning, witnesses said.

    One of the attacks left at least 30 people dead and injured. The other strike, which hit a funeral procession in a separate area, killed 28 civilians including two children.

    Thursday's incident came after another US airstrike killed at least 52 civilians, including several women and children, in the city of Sangin in southern Helmand province last month.

    US-led forces in Afghanistan regularly launch attacks on alleged militant hideouts, but the strikes usually result in civilian casualties.

    Despite a promise by the commander of US and NATO forces in Afghanistan to reduce civilian casualties, the civilian fatalities are on the rise.

    In a new statement, General David Petraeus emphasized on Wednesday that protecting the Afghan people was the top priority in the nine-year war.

    "We must continue -- indeed, redouble -- our efforts to reduce the loss of innocent civilian life to an absolute minimum," said Petraeus.

    28 Afghan civilians killed in US airstrike
  14. muse
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    muse PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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    It is religious truth in the US that the world depises her because they despise her freedoms - this in opposition for to what the world for its suggestion that it is US policies that are despised not US as an entity -- but the former idea makes it easier to identify friend and foe (policy the same as US) - so be it -- but look at reality:


    August 6, 2010
    For American Students, Life Lessons in the Mideast
    By JENNIFER CONLIN
    Cairo

    AT first glance, they seem like typical American college students on their junior year abroad, swapping stories of language mishaps and cultural clashes, sharing sightseeing tips and travel deals. But these students are not studying at Oxford, the Sorbonne or an art institute in Florence.

    Instead, they are attending the American University in Cairo, studying Arabic, not French, and dealing with cultural, social and religious matters far more complex than those in Spain or Italy. And while their European counterparts might head to Heidelberg, Germany, for a weekend of beer drinking, these students visit places most Americans know only through news reports — the West Bank, Ethiopia and even northern Iraq. No “Sex and the City” jaunts to Abu Dhabi for this group.

    In what educators are calling the fastest growing study-abroad program, American college students are increasingly choosing to spend their traditional junior year abroad in places like Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and the United Arab Emirates, wanting to experience the Arab world beyond America’s borders and viewpoints.

    According to a February 2010 report from the Institute of International Education, a private nonprofit group that administers the Fulbright program for the United States government, the number of American students studying in Arabic-speaking countries increased sixfold to 3,399 in 2007 from 562 in 2002.

    While that number may seem small compared with the more than 33,000 American students who headed to the United Kingdom in 2007 and the 13,000 who studied in China, it represents the fastest growing region for study abroad in the world. Between 2006 and 2007 the number of American students studying in Arab countries rose nearly 60 percent while China had only a 19 percent increase and England, 1.9 percent.

    These numbers have no doubt been bolstered by the Critical Language Scholarship Program, begun in 2006 by the State Department — a government initiative set up to encourage college-age students to study Arabic, as well as 12 other listed languages, including Punjabi and Azerbaijani. Since then the program has become so popular (more than 12,000 students having applied for the Arabic program since its inception, with 800 being awarded scholarships), that this year eligibility was restricted to college and graduate students who have already had at least one year of Arabic.

    Lisa Anderson, the provost at the American University in Cairo, which has a student population of around 7,000, said she has “absolutely seen a surge in U.S. students’ interest in the region,” adding that before 9/11 the university had 50 to 75 American students studying there each year, compared with around 350 a semester now.

    “But you have to understand, these are not the same kids who go bike touring in France,” said Ms. Anderson, who joined the faculty two years ago from Columbia University. “Many are contemplating careers in the Middle East, perhaps with the Foreign Service or an N.G.O. They are very serious about this region of the world

    Alex Thompson, 21, a Princeton senior this academic year who spent last year at the American University in Cairo, is typical of the student Ms. Anderson described. His interest in the Middle East stemmed from a summer spent at Seeds of Peace, a camp based in Maine with a mission to empower high school students from America, Egypt, Israel and the Palestinian territories, as well as other war-torn areas, to work for a better future.

    “I knew then I wanted to learn more about the conflict in the Middle East and live there,” Mr. Thompson said, adding that he spent one of his last vacations in Egypt traveling around Kurdistan with some friends. “We took a cab to Iraq from Turkey,” he said, as casually as if he had just jumped the Eurostar from London to Paris.

    LIKE most American students traveling to the Arab world, Mr. Thompson had already taken two years of modern standard Arabic at Princeton. Yet modern standard Arabic is a formal written form (the language of the Koran) that is rarely spoken in the streets and is likened to Shakespearean English — making it necessary for serious students to learn one of the many spoken regional dialects. Mr. Thompson, who hopes to work in Islamic finance one day, learned Egyptian colloquial Arabic, the everyday language in Cairo.

    Brian Reeves, 21, and Leigh Nusbaum, 20, incoming seniors at Brandeis University, are Jewish, speak Hebrew and have spent considerable time in Israel. Hoping to one day work on the peace settlement, they came to the Middle East last term wanting to explore the other side of the Arab-Israeli conflict while honing their language skills.

    “Arabic is the new Russian,” said Ms. Nusbaum, who spent last spring studying at the American University in Cairo and wants to become a regional diplomat. Mr. Reeves chose the University of Jordan in Amman, where he learned the Levantine dialect spoken in the Palestinian territories, Syria and Lebanon. “I wanted to find out what Jews and Arabs have in common,” Mr. Reeves said. “A lot.”

    Both students traveled extensively, including personal fact-finding visits to Palestinian refugee camps, as well as to Ramallah in the West Bank, all the while being discreet about their Jewish identity. Despite peace among Israel, Jordan and Egypt, strong feelings exist in all three countries when it comes to the Palestinian conflict.

    To that end, Mr. Reeves quickly learned to speak in code when in public. “Israel became ‘Disneyland,’ Tel Aviv was ‘Epcot,’ and Jerusalem was called, ‘Cinderella’s Castle,’ ” he said. For Ms. Nusbaum, the experience of being delayed at the Israeli border for nearly five hours when she tried to cross from Jordan into the West Bank was both frustrating and enlightening. “I had stamps in my passport from Lebanon and Syria so they questioned me extensively before letting me through,” she said. “It gave me a real taste of what the Palestinians go through.”

    Female American students also see what life is like for women in the Middle East. Hannah McDermott, 20, a senior this year at Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations, spent last semester in Cairo researching women’s rights issues in Egypt, including female genital mutilation and human trafficking, for a United Nations organization. Though she said it helped her decide her future (she would like to work on women’s issues in Iran and Afghanistan), she remembers feeling the sting of “every man’s eyes,” despite dressing conservatively. No wonder it is not unusual for American mothers to worry about their daughters studying here. When Ms. McDermott told her mother her study-abroad destination, she said, ‘Why can’t you just go to France like other kids?”

    Anna Khandros, 21, faced a similar reaction from her family when she told them she wanted to study in Beirut. “It is not easy to get your parents to let you go to a country with a State Department travel advisory, that is also home to a U.S. defined terrorist group, and that just went through a war,” said Ms. Khandros, who this academic year will be back at Brandeis and spent last semester at the American University of Beirut. Once there, however, any anxiety evaporated. “A.U.B. is like a resort,” said Ms. Khandros, who is studying the history of the modern Middle East. “My dorms look out over the beach and Beirut is an incredibly cosmopolitan and safe city during peaceful times.
    ”

    Last year, 135 American study-abroad students were enrolled at the American University of Beirut, according to Rania Murr, the university’s international student services coordinator. “The year after the war,” she said, referring to the 2006 conflict, “we actually had an increase of American students.” She said that during the war many preferred to stay in the mountains with the families of fellow Lebanese students than to return home.

    American University in Washington, which has had a 400 percent increase in the number of students studying in the Middle East since 2004, stopped sending students to Beirut after 2006. “Getting our students out during the war was very difficult,” said Sara Dumont, the director of American University Abroad (the State Department travel advisory says that American citizens must arrange their own travel out of Lebanon if unrest occurs).

    J. Scott Van Der Meid, the director of study abroad at Brandeis, said the university never stopped sending students to Beirut but now provides them with a special type of emergency evacuation insurance. “Clearly the Middle East is an area of the world that is on our students’ radar screen and we don’t want to prohibit them from going there,” Mr. Van Der Meid said. “But we need to keep them safe.”

    THOUGH American University has halted its Beirut program, it is starting one in Syria this spring. “Few Syrians speak English, so it is a better place for American students to really immerse themselves in the language,” Ms. Dumont said, noting that most of the classes are taught in English at American University in Cairo and in Beirut.

    “These students know there is a shortage in America of Arabic speakers,” she said. “Knowing the language can only increase their job prospects.”

    To that end, Middlebury College students are obligated to take a “language pledge” to speak only Arabic during their time in Alexandria, Egypt (the only exception being calls home). Michael Kremer, 21, a senior at Tufts University, is nearly fluent after attending Middlebury’s program. “I learned so much more Arabic than any of my friends studying on other programs,” he said, adding that they were housed in dormitories with local students with whom they practiced their Arabic.

    Already most of these students have seen their experiences in the Middle East translate into coveted internships and jobs. Brian Reeves spent this summer working for a congresswoman in Washington, as well as doing research for the Jewish Dialogue Group, a grass-roots organization trying to foster constructive discussions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict within Jewish communities.

    Alex Thompson, from Princeton, earned a paid internship in Cairo this summer with a social entrepreneurship nongovernmental organization helping Egyptians write business plans. And William Zeman, a senior at American University, returned from a study-abroad program at the America-Mideast Educational and Training Services in Cairo with more than 20 clips, some front page, from an internship at the Daily News Egypt, an English-language newspaper.

    More important, these students say they now view the region completely differently. Kathryn Baxter, 20, a student at American University, said of her time in Egypt, “I will never again look at a story about the Middle East with such a one-sided perspective.” Anthony Clairmont, 21, a senior at Sewanee: The University of the South, who spent six months in Morocco, said, “I genuinely enjoyed watching the bottom fall out of every one of my preconceived ideas about the Muslim world.”

    Yet none of them said they had confronted anti-American sentiment, other than occasional disagreements over foreign policy. “I found that whether I was in Cairo, Aswan, Amman or Damascus, people with whom I interacted wanted to talk about common interests — family, sports, music and economics — rather than our struggles and disagreements,” said Richard Frohlichstein, 21, a senior at Georgetown University who spent last autumn at American University in Cairo.

    Or as Anna Oltman, 21, a senior at Franklin & Marshall College, said about her semester in Egypt: “For better or worse, and certainly not unintentionally, 9/11 linked our generation of Americans with its parallel generation of Middle Easterners. We need to get to know them.”




    Lets have more, a lot more of this and a whole lot less of "they hate our freedoms"
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  15. CAPTAIN AMERICA
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    CAPTAIN AMERICA BANNED

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    Does that work both ways,

    Diplomatic Impunity
    In early 2005, Virginia police closed in on a suspected child predator -- a man in his 40s who cops say drove four hours to meet a 13-year-old girl he'd met on the Internet, promising to teach her about sex. It turned out the girl was really a cop, and officers arrested the man at a shopping mall.

    But then it was the police who got an unpleasant surprise. Their suspect, Salem Al-Mazrooei, was a diplomat from the United Arab Emirates -- and therefore covered by "diplomatic immunity." The cops had to let him go. Days later, Al-Mazrooei left the country, never having spent a night in jail.

    In 1999, a Bangladeshi woman named Shamela Begum said she was essentially enslaved by a senior Bahraini envoy to the UN and his wife. Begum charged that the couple took her passport, struck her and paid her just $800 for ten months of service

    When Congress took a look at diplomatic immunity in the 1980s, a New York police detective testified about tracking down a suspect in a series of rapes. Although the suspect had been identified by two victims, the police had to let him go after 45 minutes because he was the son of a diplomat from Ghana. As he left, the former detective told The New York Times, "he snickered and said, 'I told you I had diplomatic immunity

    Diplomatic Immunity Going Too Far: Diplomatic Impunity | Michael Crowley | Reader's Digest
    Foreign Countries diplomats and UN representives have been involved n 1000s of incidents in the USA, or is this just a one way street.

    also http://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...omats-committed-serious-offences-2012874.html
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2010
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