What's new

China tests AI-powered long-range artillery that can hit a person 16km away

Nan Yang

SENIOR MEMBER
Joined
May 1, 2010
Messages
5,252
Reaction score
1
Country
Malaysia
Location
Malaysia

China tests AI-powered long-range artillery that can hit a person 16km away

  • Multiple test launches achieve lethal accuracy greater than guns used now
  • High-precision cannons could significantly cut costs of war, researchers say

Stephen Chen

Stephen Chen in Beijing
Published: 7:00pm, 17 Apr, 2023

1681757496768.png


China’s military has used artificial intelligence to improve the accuracy of long-range artillery and potentially reduce the cost of warfare, according to a team of scientists working on the technology for the People’s Liberation Army (PLA).

In multiple tests conducted under various conditions last July, the researchers determined that their AI-powered laser-guided artillery could hit human-sized targets 16km (9.9 miles) away. :o:

The precision achieved in the tests, which exceeded expectations, was far higher than that of any big guns in service, according to photos of the tests that showed the shells hit target boards in the bull’s-eye.

“Artificial intelligence is evolving quickly. More researchers are applying the technology to trajectory planning problems,” said the project’s team leader, Professor Wang Jiang, from the Beijing Institute of Technology, in a paper published in the peer-reviewed journal Acta Armamentarii on April 6.

1681757540946.png

Traditional artillery shells can land 100 metres (328 feet) or more away from a target. Guided artillery shells, which can make course adjustments during flight, are finding wider applications by militaries in China, the United States and other countries.

However, their accuracy has been limited due to the huge amount of real-time data that must be calculated using traditional mathematical models. Flight variables such as wind, temperature and air pressure can limit the precision of an artillery round to the point that it could miss its target by a few or tens of metres.

Instead of traditional mathematical methods, AI offers the potential for faster data-processing speeds, according to Wang, as well as collaborators from China’s defence industry and experts from a Beijing-based China-United Arab Emirates Belt and Road joint laboratory on intelligent unmanned systems.

Once a smart shell is launched, it must quickly collect and analyse a wide variety of environmental data to fine-tune its course – calculations that can increase exponentially with the number of variables.

The shell’s computer chip must be as simple as possible as it must withstand the enormous heat and shock of artillery fire. Facing such demands, processors must often discard valuable raw data to complete the calculations in time, thus affecting overall

But with AI, even a slow computer chip can finish necessary calculations using nearly all available data, according to Wang’s team.

As it learns from training based on data collected in real flights or laboratory experiments, AI can bypass some of the more demanding calculations performed under traditional approaches, according to the researchers.

The team also tested several AI models on tasks associated with sophisticated trajectory adjustments during flight. This division of labour among the AI models enabled further accuracy improvements, they said.

Both China and the US are racing to develop smart artillery to help cut the costs of warfare. Artillery shells are usually much cheaper than missiles, and can be quickly produced in large numbers.

Last year, the US Army awarded a US$66 million contract to arms maker Raytheon for an unspecified quantity of GPS-guided artillery smart munitions, with ranges of up to 40km, according to some media reports.

Chinese state media last year released footage of a live-fire exercise, which showed a moving car being destroyed by a smart artillery round, :fie:but the effective distance and accuracy of the weapon was not disclosed.

A new smart mortar deployed by the PLA has also reportedly achieved hits within centimetre-precision.:china:However, mortars usually have shorter ranges and lower speeds compared to artillery.

Meanwhile, debate has continued over whether artillery fire requires such high accuracy.

Since shrapnel from a heavy shell blast can hit a person several hundred metres away, some military experts have said precision is unnecessary.

But others have argued that a high-precision cannon would be very useful for the PLA in the event of an attack on Taiwan.

In urban warfare, AI-powered artillery could neutralise enemy units or vehicles hidden in buildings with more efficiency than traditional fire power and at lower costs than missiles, said a Beijing-based defence industry engineer who was not involved in Wang’s project and asked not to be named due to the sensitivity of the topic.

“It will help reduce civilian casualties and damage to surrounding buildings. It will make reunification and reconstruction after the war easier,” he said.
 
Last year, the US Army awarded a US$66 million contract to arms maker Raytheon for an unspecified quantity of GPS-guided artillery smart munitions, with ranges of up to 40km, according to some media reports.

They've been using GPS artillery shells for over 10 years. Here they are using it in Afghanistan.

Jan 23, 2013

Excalibur Shot For First Time By Gunners in Afghanistan​


Being used in Ukraine:

Ukraine Destroy Russias Newest Tank T-90M With Excalibur​

 
Last edited:
They've been using GPS artillery shells for over 10 years. Here they are using it in Afghanistan.

Jan 23, 2013

Excalibur Shot For First Time By Gunners in Afghanistan​


Being used in Ukraine:

Ukraine Destroy Russias Newest Tank T-90M With Excalibur​

AI = Artificial Intelligence.

Quote
But with AI, even a slow computer chip can finish necessary calculations using nearly all available data, according to Wang’s team.
  • High-precision cannons could significantly cut costs of war, researchers say



Your own posted Video.
At 4:30 "They don't get shot often because of the HIGH cost ($80,000 per round). :P
 
AI = Artificial Intelligence.

Quote
But with AI, even a slow computer chip can finish necessary calculations using nearly all available data, according to Wang’s team.
  • High-precision cannons could significantly cut costs of war, researchers say



Your own posted Video.
At 4:30 "They don't get shot often because of the HIGH cost ($80,000 per round). :P

The US has a guided artillery round developed by General Dynamics that can hit moving and imprecisely located targets whose exact position is highly uncertainty in a GPS denied environment using AI.

Unlike the Chinese version which uses AI to improve accuracy. The US round uses AI while in flight to find targets, select a HV target and then identify the most vulnerable spot on the target to maximize damage.
 
The US has a guided artillery round developed by General Dynamics that can hit moving and imprecisely located targets whose exact position is highly uncertainty in a GPS denied environment using AI.

Unlike the Chinese version which uses AI to improve accuracy. The US round uses AI while in flight to find targets, select a HV target and then identify the most vulnerable spot on the target to maximize damage.
And it will also fly in a circle too. 🤣
 
If it is intended for widely use in the battle field,It will all depend on how many of them can be manufactured and the price per unit. US now is even very low with conventional ammo due to Ukraine war.
 
And it will also fly in a circle too. 🤣
I get your skepticism, but did you really think using AI to control trajectory in fight is special? You don't need AI to deflect control surfaces in flight in response to atmospheric conditions to improve precision a 386 processor from the 80's can do that.. :lol:
 

China tests AI-powered long-range artillery that can hit a person 16km away

  • Multiple test launches achieve lethal accuracy greater than guns used now
  • High-precision cannons could significantly cut costs of war, researchers say

Stephen Chen

Stephen Chen in Beijing
Published: 7:00pm, 17 Apr, 2023

View attachment 925170

China’s military has used artificial intelligence to improve the accuracy of long-range artillery and potentially reduce the cost of warfare, according to a team of scientists working on the technology for the People’s Liberation Army (PLA).

In multiple tests conducted under various conditions last July, the researchers determined that their AI-powered laser-guided artillery could hit human-sized targets 16km (9.9 miles) away. :o:

The precision achieved in the tests, which exceeded expectations, was far higher than that of any big guns in service, according to photos of the tests that showed the shells hit target boards in the bull’s-eye.

“Artificial intelligence is evolving quickly. More researchers are applying the technology to trajectory planning problems,” said the project’s team leader, Professor Wang Jiang, from the Beijing Institute of Technology, in a paper published in the peer-reviewed journal Acta Armamentarii on April 6.

View attachment 925171
Traditional artillery shells can land 100 metres (328 feet) or more away from a target. Guided artillery shells, which can make course adjustments during flight, are finding wider applications by militaries in China, the United States and other countries.

However, their accuracy has been limited due to the huge amount of real-time data that must be calculated using traditional mathematical models. Flight variables such as wind, temperature and air pressure can limit the precision of an artillery round to the point that it could miss its target by a few or tens of metres.

Instead of traditional mathematical methods, AI offers the potential for faster data-processing speeds, according to Wang, as well as collaborators from China’s defence industry and experts from a Beijing-based China-United Arab Emirates Belt and Road joint laboratory on intelligent unmanned systems.

Once a smart shell is launched, it must quickly collect and analyse a wide variety of environmental data to fine-tune its course – calculations that can increase exponentially with the number of variables.

The shell’s computer chip must be as simple as possible as it must withstand the enormous heat and shock of artillery fire. Facing such demands, processors must often discard valuable raw data to complete the calculations in time, thus affecting overall

But with AI, even a slow computer chip can finish necessary calculations using nearly all available data, according to Wang’s team.

As it learns from training based on data collected in real flights or laboratory experiments, AI can bypass some of the more demanding calculations performed under traditional approaches, according to the researchers.

The team also tested several AI models on tasks associated with sophisticated trajectory adjustments during flight. This division of labour among the AI models enabled further accuracy improvements, they said.

Both China and the US are racing to develop smart artillery to help cut the costs of warfare. Artillery shells are usually much cheaper than missiles, and can be quickly produced in large numbers.

Last year, the US Army awarded a US$66 million contract to arms maker Raytheon for an unspecified quantity of GPS-guided artillery smart munitions, with ranges of up to 40km, according to some media reports.

Chinese state media last year released footage of a live-fire exercise, which showed a moving car being destroyed by a smart artillery round, :fie:but the effective distance and accuracy of the weapon was not disclosed.

A new smart mortar deployed by the PLA has also reportedly achieved hits within centimetre-precision.:china:However, mortars usually have shorter ranges and lower speeds compared to artillery.

Meanwhile, debate has continued over whether artillery fire requires such high accuracy.

Since shrapnel from a heavy shell blast can hit a person several hundred metres away, some military experts have said precision is unnecessary.

But others have argued that a high-precision cannon would be very useful for the PLA in the event of an attack on Taiwan.

In urban warfare, AI-powered artillery could neutralise enemy units or vehicles hidden in buildings with more efficiency than traditional fire power and at lower costs than missiles, said a Beijing-based defence industry engineer who was not involved in Wang’s project and asked not to be named due to the sensitivity of the topic.

“It will help reduce civilian casualties and damage to surrounding buildings. It will make reunification and reconstruction after the war easier,” he said.
I have just 1 question.

WHAT IS THE POINT TO HAVE AI Calculate the flight path to hit a single person with an artillery round.

As a solder who was trained on this, target selection for artillery is not really anything priority, set aside the fact that 16km is very short range, you don't generally do that as artillery shell offer not really great explosion damage and area effect. I need to know which target I want to hit, and I generally saturate that area with inexpensive shell, sure, if you want to use GPS or any instrument guidance in flight, but not in a MOA that you can separate a person to another. Since it deals with explosion and concussion damage, even if you didn't score a "Direct Hit" on that person, you can't control the blast and concussion damage.

On the other hand, what said in red is very much absurd. You go to war with Taiwan so that you can use this shell, how does it make the reunification and reconstruction "easier"??

And if you have to resort to calling in precision artillery strike to kill a single person, something is already wrong there....
 

Back
Top Bottom