World Armies - Bangladesh

Discussion in 'Bangladesh Defence Forum' started by fatman17, Apr 8, 2009.

Share This Page

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. fatman17
    Offline

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    18,093
    Ratings:
    +17 / 18,019 / -1
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Dear BD collegues - starting a thread on the BD Army - it will take several days to compile.

    Thanks,:enjoy:
    • Thanks Thanks x 8
  2. fatman17
    Offline

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    18,093
    Ratings:
    +17 / 18,019 / -1
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Summary:
    STRENGTH
    120,000

    INFANTRY
    Brigade x 17
    Divisional Headquarters x 7

    ARMOUR
    Brigade x 1

    ARTILLERY
    Division x 1

    AIR DEFENCE
    Brigade x 1

    ENGINEER
    Brigade x 1


    Assessment
    The Bangladesh Army is institutionally a descendant of the British Indian Army. To thid day, the principal arms - infantry, armour and artillery - are modelled on the british pattern of the 1940s. Support services are regulation bound and of doubtful effectiveness.

    The inefficiency of the Bangladeshi Army has been partially tackled at regimental and brigade levels by emphasis on higher-level professional training for general staff and command positions. Key weaknesses remain at the section, platoon and company levels, since non-commissioned officers are not yet able to play the important role they must if the army is to attain combat efficiency. This is being partially redressed by the opening of a non-commissioned officers school, although selection of candidates on the basis of seniority means that much of the potential benefit is lost.

    Freedom Fighters: one of the most important divisions within the post-1971 Bangladesh Military occurred as a result of the struggle between the radical, politicised "freedom fighters" some of whom fought in the civil war and the professionals stranded in Pakistan. Resentment between these two factions was further aggravated by the special benefits and accelerated promotions granted to freedom fighters by the Awami League.

    The number of "freedom fighters" is rapidly diminishing as time passes, which may be a step forward in re-establishing merit as a prime requisite in the promotion and selection process. The pre-eminence of "freedom fighters" was, to a large extent, was restored at the end of 1997, when General Mahbubur Rehman was retired, to be succeeded by Lt.General Mustafizur Rehman, a former freedom fighter (who, as with almost all his peers, attended Pakistan's Military College).

    The almost two dozen coup attempts during the Zia years, (most of them abortive) were led by the highly politicised freedom fighters, few of whom were professional soldiers. Only a small percentage of officers belonged to the "freedom fighter" category; 25 percent were repatriates and 60 percent had been recruited since 1971. This trend was reinforced as Zia increased the size of the army through the late 70s.

    Most of the 400 officers, above the rank of Major belonged to the repatriated faction of which Gen. H.M Ershad emerged as the key leader. These officers were mostly middle or lower-middle class by background, and had family ties with urban bureaucrats, business groups and professionals. They served their early years under Generals Ayub Khan and Yayha Khan of Pakistan, and were not uncomfortable with the idea of a military government, as long as their pay, privileges and prestige were not jeopardised.

    Since the departure of Ershad, the military has stayed in its barracks, or at least has largely remained out of overt-politics, concentrating on professional duties, (until events in 2005-2007 led to the assumption of a greater role in governance). The army states that it will revert to a non-governmental role after elections are held, but it is not known when this will be possible.

    Factionalism born of efforts of the three main political parties to nurture a support base among specific groups of favoured officers persists, and has adversely affected organisational cohesion and professional competence throughout the services, most markedly within the army.
    • Thanks Thanks x 4
  3. blain2
    Offline

    blain2 SENIOR MODERATOR

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2006
    Messages:
    6,376
    Ratings:
    +25 / 6,720 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    I am making this a sticky along with the ones you have posted for the PA and IA. I think these threads have great reference material.

    Thank you FM sahib!
    • Thanks Thanks x 7
  4. MBI Munshi
    Offline

    MBI Munshi PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    7,998
    Ratings:
    +5 / 4,520 / -0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Location:
    Bangladesh
    Another first for PDF. Excellent work FM! :yahoo:
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  5. fatman17
    Offline

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    18,093
    Ratings:
    +17 / 18,019 / -1
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Blain2 you might want to check the IA and PA threads - they are not "sticky" as of today.
    Thanks!:enjoy:
  6. fatman17
    Offline

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    18,093
    Ratings:
    +17 / 18,019 / -1
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Deployments, Tasks and Operations
    On 8th March 2007 it as announced in Dhaka that the armed forces, (in effect the army), would re-constitute Bangladesh National Security Council, (disbanded in 1991), giving the military a direct role in running the country.

    In addition to this role, the army's principal role are internal security and the preservation of territorial integrity in border areas. Following the serious deterioration of law and order in late 2002, former Prime Minister Zia deployed 40,000 sailors and soldiers across the country in the anti crime "Operation Clean Heart". The troops assumed police duties, tracking down and arresting suspected criminals and recovering illegal arms, ammunition and explosives. Despite criticism by the opposition on the grounds of doubtful constitutional legality, and human rights groups on equally well-founded allegations of illegality and brutality, the army was able to reduce the rate of violent crime, but the arrest of thousands of civilians, (many of them members of the ruling party), and the death of around 40 detainees in custody, eventually led to the soldiers withdrawal in January 2008. However, another surge in violent crime led to the limited deployment of infantry and support troops in the six largest cities. The deployment was a admission that the police are incapable of discouraging and addressing criminal activity.

    There was also a marked increase of emphasis on internal security duties during the tenure of Kkaleda Zia (2001-2006), especially following the country-wide bombings in August 2005. In 2007, the army assumed greater responsibility for security duties previously undertaken by the civil police, on the establishment of a state of emergency.

    Border security is largely directed towards India. This is owing to a consistently tense relationship between Dhaka and New Delhi. caused by frequent cross-border clashes between the Bangladesh Rifles, Indian guerrillas and, (on some occasions), Indian border security forces, the most serious of which took place in August 2006. The Bangladeshi Army has no seious pretensions of being able to defend the nation against an indian attack. The fact is reflected not only in the comparitive sizes of the Bangladeshi and Indian armies, but also the scale and nature of the Bangladesh Army's equipment, which is mainly suited to counter-insurgency operations.

    However, steps are being taken to remedy some of these deficiencies. For over two decades, (until the end of 1997), the army's principal operational deployment was counter-insurgency operations in the Chittagong hill tracts. A large Infantry division, with four infantry brigades and an artillery brigade, along with considerable paramilitary and police forces, had been deployed for the region. Most infantry, artillery, engineers and signals units of the army were rotated through the division for combat experience, as well as operational reasons.
    • Thanks Thanks x 3
  7. fatman17
    Offline

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    18,093
    Ratings:
    +17 / 18,019 / -1
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Recent and Current Operations
    Bangladesh Forces have participated in many UN peacekeeping operations. They contributed one infantry battalion group and one engineer battalion to the US led coalition's campaign to free Kuwait from Iraqi occupation during the 1991 Gulf war and a number of regional training centers (with their headquarters in Dhaka) were established in 1998 with USsupport, under the Enhanced International Peacekeeping Capabilities Program (EIPCP). The army also trains military personnel earmarked for UN assignments.

    In May 2000, a combined arms battalion joined the UN forces in Sierra Leone. Following the withdrawal of Indian peacekeepers, Bangladesh sent another combined arms battalion.

    In late 2001, as plans to deploy UN peacekeeping force to Afghanistan emerged, Bangladesh offered troops but only if they were to be under UN command. Bangladesh has continued to deploy troops on peace support operations, mainly in Africa, with large numbers of army personnel sent to, and rotated, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Sudan and Cote d'Ivorie.

    As of July 2008, Bangladesh contributed the following to UN missions.
    BINUS in Burundi (one military observer)
    UNAMA in Afghanistan (four military observers)
    UNAMID in Darfur (5 troops)
    UNMEE in Ethiopia and Eriteria (2 troops and 2 military observers)
    UNMIK in Kosovo (one military observer)
    UNMIL in Liberia (2,393 troops and 18 military observers)
    UNIOSIL in Sierra Leone (one military observer)
    UNMIS in the Sudan (1,543 troops and 17 military observers)
    UNMIT in Timor Leste (four military observers)
    UNOCI in the Cote d'Ivorie (2,718 troops and 10 military observers)
    UNOMIG in Georgia (8 military observers)
    MONUC in DR Congo (1,331 troops and 20 military observers)
    MINURCAT in Central African Republic (1 military observer)
    MINURSO in Western Sahara (8 military observers)

    Command and Control
    Minister of Defence..........President Iajuddin Ahmad
    Chief of Army Staff..........General Moeen U. Ahmad

    The army has traditionally been involved in politics, and the effective governing of Bangladesh requires the support of the armed forces. Factionalism, born of efforts by the three main political parties to nurture a support base among specific groups of favoured officers, was rife. This adversely affected both organisational cohesion and professional competence of the three services. All rulers, whether elected or otherwise, have sought to maintain control over the military by various means. Their efforts to promote supportive factions have fragmented the officers corps.

    The three services are commanded by their respective chiefs of staff who are nominally co-equal, although the Army Chief of Staff is now a three star officer and inevitably predominates. This places the navy and airforce at a disadvantage, but they cannot reasonably object, as both the navy and airforce are numerically so much smaller than the army. The President is the commander in chief, and by convention the prime minister holds the defence minister's portfolio. However, at other times (when there is a chief advisor as de facto prime minister), the president retains control of the defence ministry and armed forces. The Army Chief of Staff reports directly to the prime minister on behalf of the three services, except in such circumstances, when he reports to the president.

    Since the inception of parliamentry governance in 1991, prime ministers have kept the defence portfolio to themselves, and commanded the services through the "armed forces division" of the prime minister's secretariat. This is a tri-service office with a Major-General working as the principal staff officer to the defence/prime minister, and his staff serving as the interface between the armed services and the leadership.

    Both heads of the last two elected governments, Begum Zia and Sheikh Hasina, maintained a close grip on the postings and promotion of senior officers. They have also sought to identify more junior officers thought to be supportive of their respective administrations. This has deepened the fragmentation of the officers corps and weakened the cohesion of the service.

    Army Headquarters - Dhaka

    Ordnance Factory - Joydevpur
    6 Indep AA Bde - Mirpur
    14 Enggr Bde - Dhaka
    46 Indep Inf Bde - Dhaka
    (directly reporting to Army HQ)

    55 Inf Div - Jessore - 88 Inf Bde (Jessore) - 105 Inf Bde (Jessore)
    11 Inf Div - Bogra - 93 Amd Bde (Bogra) - 111 Inf Bde (Bogra)
    24 Inf Div - Chittagong - 65 Inf Bde (Kaptai) - 69 Inf Bde (Bandarban) - 203 Inf Bde
    (Khagrachan) - 305 Inf Bde (Rangamati) - Ad Hoc Arty Bde (Dhiginala)
    33 Inf Div - Comilla - 44 Inf Bde (Comilla) - 101 Inf Bde (Comilla)
    9 Inf Div - Savar - 71 Inf Bde (Savar) - 81 Inf Bde (Savar)
    66 Inf Div - Rangpur - 72 Inf Bde (Rangpur) - 222 Inf Bde (Saidpur)
    19 Inf Div - Mymensingh - 309 Inf Bde (Ghatail) - 77 Inf Bde (Mymensingh)
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2009
    • Thanks Thanks x 3
  8. batmannow
    Online

    batmannow ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    13,957
    Ratings:
    +2 / 5,238 / -11
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Thailand
    plz give some info, about the role of ssg in BDarmy.
    thanks
  9. fatman17
    Offline

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    18,093
    Ratings:
    +17 / 18,019 / -1
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Organisation
    Organisation is conventional with Army HQ in Dhaka and formations deployed country-wide.Principal Staff Officers (all two star rank), are:
    Adjutant General
    Military Secretary
    Quartermaster General
    Master General of Ordnance
    Engineer-in-Chief

    Infantry division HQ locations are:
    9 - Savar (near Dhaka)
    11- Bogra (includes 93 Armoured Brigade)
    14 - Dhaka
    24 - Chittagong
    33 - Comilla
    55 - Jessore (including an armoured regiment)
    66 - Rangpur (including an armoured regiment)

    The Bangladesh Army's 17 infantry brigades generally have one, two or three infantry battalions, (of which there are 26 in total), with obsolete equipment. There are few infantry combat vehicles or armoured personnel carriers, and inadequate soft-skinned vehicles. Transport is by truck where available. There is no organised helicopter troop-lift capability. Bangladesh's army largely moves at the speed of marching troops. The armoured brigade, based in the northwest of the country, has armoured and mechanised infantry components. In addition, two infantry divisions have a armoured regiment each. At present these units are designed to provide anti-tank defence to respective formations, and there are no plans for combining them into a second armoured brigade with offensive capability. Although such a future course cannot be discounted, the raising of a future brigade HQ would strain resources.

    24 division, (deployed in the Chittagong hill tracts region) commands four infantry brigades. Five other divisions command two infantry brigades, and a artillery brigade each. The independent engineer and air defence brigades operate under army army HQ, which has a infantry brigade under direct command. Divisions are considered operationally autonomous, as it is assumed that once hostilities commence, the army HQ may not be able to excercise full control over deployments and manage individual missions. Each division and brigade has been assigned operational sectors along the borders with Myanmar and India.

    7 x infantry divisional HQs
    17 x infantry brigades
    1 x armoured brigade
    5 x artillery brigades (three with three artillery regiments, two with two artillery regiments)
    1 x engineer brigade
    1 x air defence brigade

    Concept and Operations
    Although there is no combined military doctrine, concepts have evolved to the extent that the army is entirely defensive in organisation, equipment, training and attitude. It will be expected to provide the primary defence against any external threat, trading limited space for time by exploiting the riverine nature of the delta country, and hoping for foreign, diplomatic and possibly more robust, intervention to crystalline before regular forces are reduced to ineffective levels.

    Should the state be reached when combat and conventional operations become unsustainable, residual regular sub-units, would form the nuclei of guerrilla units operatiing semi-independently in what is described as "the phase 2", essentially to raise the costs of occupation beyond acceptable levels. The forested Chittagong hill tracts region in the country's southeastern quadrant is seen as a possible jumping off point for mounting a different form of resistance in the shape of jungle warfare.

    In 2002, at least one, and possibly more, divisions experimented with "simultaneous phases 1 and 2". In this format infantry brigades conduct defensive operations to halt enemy ingress while paramilitary units undertake guerrilla operations against the enemy's rear in occupied territory. This is not a standard procedure across the army.

    Reserves
    In late 1995, the Bangladesh government adopted a proposal by the then Chief of Army Staff, Lt.Gen Abu Saleh Mohammad Nasim, to form the country's first reserve force. Before his removal, he proposed the plan in an effort to partly resolve the army's chronic manpower shortage. There has been no progress in creating unit or individual ready reserves.

    Army Aviation Order of Battle
    There are two Army Aviation squadrons, operating 6 Cessna 152/337 and three Bell 206 helicopters. Flying instruction is provided at the Aviation Center at Dhaka Tejgaon.
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  10. fatman17
    Offline

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    18,093
    Ratings:
    +17 / 18,019 / -1
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Operational Art and Tactical Doctrine
    The government has not developed a well-defined defence doctrine and successive administrations have left the task to the military high command. The army HQs, with advice from the National Defence College (NDC), (and respective divisional HQs) has worked out an operational doctrine which is essentially defensive and suggests that the army trade space for time.

    Given the relatively small size of the country and the flat terrain, that may be inappropriate. The army appears to count on the over 200 wide, often unbridgeable, rivers for its advantage, to enable it to occupy a series of linear defensive positions to prevent swift penetration and thereby buy time for diplomatic and possibly other forms of international intervention. The likelihood of outflanking parachute and special forces operations, (as in the 1971 war, by Indian forces against the Pakistan Army), nullifies this optimistic proposal.

    Bases
    Bogra
    Chittagong
    Comilla
    Jessore
    Mymensingh
    Savar
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  11. Contrarian
    Offline

    Contrarian BANNED

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2006
    Messages:
    11,605
    Ratings:
    +18 / 10,591 / -13
    I did not know that Bangladeshi Army was in such a bad shape. This after them having ruled the country for a few years. Did they not try to buy new equipment , clearly define a doctrine, and then train at that time?
  12. batmannow
    Online

    batmannow ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    13,957
    Ratings:
    +2 / 5,238 / -11
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Thailand
    I mean special forces in BD army, are they have or not have?
  13. fatman17
    Offline

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    18,093
    Ratings:
    +17 / 18,019 / -1
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    so far it seems not!:enjoy:
  14. MBI Munshi
    Offline

    MBI Munshi PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    7,998
    Ratings:
    +5 / 4,520 / -0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Location:
    Bangladesh
    The expert on this is Leonblack but he is on vacation I think. The BD army certainly needs improvement.
  15. fatman17
    Offline

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    18,093
    Ratings:
    +17 / 18,019 / -1
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Training
    Recruits receive basic training at regimental and service centres. Specialised and advanced training, (with courses ranging in length from four to 10 weeks), is given at Schools of Military Instruction located at various garrisons. Officer cadets graduate from the Bangladesh Military Academy near Chittagong. The standard course lasts two academic yeaes, although shorter courses have been run from time to time to fill large gaps in the Officer's corps. Subsequent training takes place at the School of Infantry and Tactics or at the other arms and service schools. General Staff Officers from all three services are trained at the DSCSC in Dhaka. On the course that ended in Feburary 2007, attendance numbered 142 personnel, made up of 72 from the army, 18 from the navy and 21 from the airforce. There were 33 foreign students, from Brunei, China, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Malaysia, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sri Lanka and Sudan.

    The National Defence College (NDC), 12 km north of Dhaka city centre, was initially headed by a faculty provided by a British Military Assistance Team, until Bangladeshi faculty members were trained and took over. The NDC runs a 10 month course every calender year for 25 senior officers from the armed forces of the rank of brigadier or equivalent and five civil servants. The distribution of the services places is army 15, navy five and airforce five. Some officers are sent on courses to the US, China, France, Germany and the UK.

    There is no commanding officers course but all officers aspiring to higher rank must attend the DSCSC. It has been proposed that an Army War Course (AWC) be conducted for Lt.Colonels, to provide a bridge between the DSCSC and the NDC, but no progress has been made.

    The Bangladesh Institute of Peace Support Operation Training (BIPSOT), was established on 24 June 1999. The purpose was to prepare officers and troops to assume UN assigned responsibilities when called for. BIPSOT is based at Rajendrapur Cantonment,Gazipur. It conducts courses on peace support operations on a regular basis. BIPSOT also conducts sub-unit/unit group training excercises on peace support operations at local and multinational level.

    Establishment of staff courses has contributed to improving efficiency at battalion and brigade levels but there are weaknesses at section, platoon and company levels since non-commissioned officers are not yet able to play the important role they must if units are to attain combat efficiency. Establishment of a non-commissioned officers school has gone some way to improving the situation, but selection of candidates on the basis of seniority rather than merit means that much of the potential benefit is lost.

    Routine training is conducted at sub-unit level at peacetime stations throughout the year but is not considered effective. Each infantry division has its own collective training area close to the international boundary in its operational sector. Collective training in "phase 1", or conventional operations, at battalion, brigade and divisional levels takes place every dry season (November to February), and sometimes in the rainy season. Armoured and artillery units carry out field firing at a range near Chittagong in the southeast of the country. A smaller range has been built near the northeastern town of Bogra.

    The Bangladesh Army is deficient in its training of NCOs for the post of junior non-commissioned officers (NCOs), (which the next grade up). The chief of army staff has ordered the training curriculam be reviewed and that NCOs to receive specialised training.

    US allocations for training (under IMETS, the International Military Education and Training Program), have been allocated (in USD) as follows;
    2005 - USD 1,035,000
    2006 - USD 930,000
    2007 - USD 985,000
    2008 - USD 800,000

    In early 2004, Bangladesh approved the draft of a defence agreement with Kuwait under which members of the Bangladeshi armed forces would vocational and technical training to the Kuwaiti armed forces. It does not appear that the project proceeded.
    Training establishments include;
    Bangladesh Military Academy (BMA), Bhatiary, Chittagong
    School of Infantry and Tactics (SINT), Jalalabad, Sylhet.
    Defence Services Command and Staff College (DSCSC), Mirpur
    National Defence College (NDC), Mirpur Cantonment, Dhaka
    Military Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), Mirpur
    Armoured Corps Centre & School (ACC&S),Majhira, Bogra
    Engineer Centre and School of Military Engineering, Quadirabad, Natore
    Signal Training Centre & School, Jessore
    Ordnance Corps Centre & School, Rajendrapur, Gazipur
    Bangladesh Institute of Peace Support Operations (BIPSOT), Rajendrapur, Gazipur
    Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Centre and School, Saidpur Cantonment
    Corps of Military Police Centre and School, Ghatail, Tangail
    Army School of Education and Administration, Ghatail, Tangail
    Army School of Physical Training and Sports (ASPTS), Dhaka Cantonment
    Army School of Music, Chittagong
    Armed Forces Medical College, Dhaka
    School of Military Intelligence, Comilla
    Army Computer Training School (ACTS), Dhaka Cantonment
    Non Commissioned Officer's Academy, Majhira, Bogra


    Recruitment
    Recruitment is by voluntary enlistment. Army recruiters can afford to be selective, as the armed forces incorporate only a very small percentage of the population and offer one of the most secure occupations in the country. Military training takes place almost entirely within Bangladesh.
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.