Cryogenic rocket engine : India

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Forum' started by Ammyy, Apr 18, 2011.

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  1. Ammyy
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    Ammyy SENIOR MEMBER

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    Hi friends

    This thread is for Indian cryogenic engine program
    As we know we have two cryogenic engine program CE-15, CE-20 by Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) but very less info about them on net.

    Please share if any one know info about cryogenic engine
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  2. Ammyy
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    Ammyy SENIOR MEMBER

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    [​IMG]
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  3. ramu
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    ramu SENIOR MEMBER

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    India's Efforts to Master Cryogenic Engine Tech Setback Commercial Space Program

    India's ambitious attempt to master a technology needed to launch heavy satellites into space has not succeeded. This could setback the country's hopes of getting a bigger share of the multibillion dollar global satellite launch market.

    The launch of a rocket using a domestically built cryogenic engine Thursday evening from Sriharikota in southern India was meant to demonstrate India's mastery of a complex technology.

    Cryogenic engines are rocket motors designed for fuels that have to be held at very low temperatures, and make it possible to launch heavy satellites into space.

    But disappointed Indian scientists saw the rocket veer off its path after eight minutes and plunge into the Bay of Bengal.

    The chairman of the Indian Space Research Organization K. Radhakrishnan said the rocket went out of control.

    "We saw the vehicle was tumbling indicating that controllability was lost…The detailed analysis of the flight data would be carried out," he said.

    He said that Indian scientists will continue work to perfect the technology within a year.

    India has spent nearly two decades on developing the cryogenic engine. Only the United States, Russia, France, Japan and China posses the restricted technology.

    The failure of the flight test using a cryogenic engine will setback India's efforts to grab a larger slice of the multi-billion dollar commercial satellite launch business.

    The lucrative market is currently controlled by an exclusive club of space-faring nations, including the United States, Russia, China, Ukraine and the European Space Agency.

    The launch of a small Italian satellite into space in 2007 gave India a foothold in the market.

    However India's dependence on Russian built cryogenic engines to launch heavy satellites has hampered growth, and prompted Indian scientists to develop the technology.

    Indian space scientists hope to offer satellite launch services at much cheaper rates compared to Western countries, and expand the business to about $120 million a year.

    India is an emerging space power and has been designing and building rockets for an ambitious space program.
  4. ramu
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    ramu SENIOR MEMBER

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    ^^^ this was a year back ... Current updates ... Please post here.
  5. Ammyy
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    Ammyy SENIOR MEMBER

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    "Ok the CE20 mystery is resolved. The 'E' in 'CE20' stands for Engine and not for stage. Looking at the panel it is clear how ISRO does the numbering.
    So C12.5 is Cryo stage carrying 12.5 tonne fuel and using the engine CE7.5 developing 7.5 tonne thrust.
    So C25 is Cryo stage carrying 25 tonne fuel and using the engine CE20 developing 20 tonne thrust."

    Bharat Rakshak • View topic - Indian Space Program Discussion
  6. Ammyy
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    Ammyy SENIOR MEMBER

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    Six months after a failed test, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) successfully conducted the second static testing of its liquid core stage (L110) of Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark III (GSLV Mk -III), according to a press release.

    The test lasted 200 seconds at ISRO's Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) test facility at Mahendragiri today (September 8, 2010) at 15:50 hrs.

    L110 is one of the heaviest earth storable liquid stages ever developed by ISRO. L110 stage had two high pressure Vikas engines in a clustered configuration. Nearly 500 health parameters were monitored during the test and the initial data acquired indicates its normal performance.

    Today’s successful test of L110 for its full flight duration of 200 seconds, is a major milestone in the earth storable liquid rocket programme of ISRO and a significant step forward in the development of GSLV-Mk III launch vehicle.

    ISRO conducted the test for 150 seconds at LPSC test facility on March 5 this year. While the test was originally targeted for 200 seconds it was stopped at 150 seconds since a deviation in one of the parameters - minor leakage in the command system - was observed.

    It may be recalled that GSLV-Mk III, which is currently under advanced stage of development, uses two solid strap-on boosters (S200), L110 liquid stage and a cryogenic upper stage C-25.
    The Hindu : Sci-Tech : ISRO successfully conducts static testing of new age rocket
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  7. Kinetic
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    Kinetic SENIOR MEMBER

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    This is the latest update of GSLV mk III developments and its C-25 cryogenic engine.... Question asked by a MP in Parliament recently about GSLV mk III development.





    http://www.isro.org/parliament/2011/Budget/LUSQ3347.pdf


    GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
    DEPARTMENT OF SPACE


    LOK SABHA
    UNSTARRED QUESTION NO.3347

    TO BE ANSWERED ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2011

    STATIC TEST ST-02

    SHRI K SHIVAKUMAR
    ALIAS J.K. RITHEESH:

    Will the PRIME MINISTER be pleased to state:

    whether the S-200 Static Test (ST-02), L110 Stage test
    has been completed as planned earlier;

    if so, the details thereof;

    whether the work on C25 Cryogenic Engine for GSLV
    MK III has been completed; and

    if so, the details thereof?





    ANSWER

    MINISTER OF STATE IN THE MINISTRIES OF PARLIAMENTARY
    AFFAIRS, PERSONNEL, PUBLIC GRIEVANCES & PENSIONS
    AND IN PRIME MINISTER’S OFFICE
    (SHRI V.NARAYANASAMY):



    The first Static Test (ST-01) of the S-200 solid booster stage of GSLV-MkIII, was successfully conducted in 2010 at Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota. Presently, preparations are progressing for conducting the second Static Test (ST-02) of S-200 solid booster stage. The test is planned during mid-2011. So far, stage-level tests have been completed for the L110 liquid core stage twice, at Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC), Mahendragiri. The first test was conducted in March 2010 for a duration of 150 seconds; and the second test was for its full flight duration of 200 seconds, in September, 2010.


    The work towards realization of C25 Cryogenic Engine for the GSLV-MkIII programme is progressing well. Major sub-systems of the C25 Cryogenic Engine such as Gas Generator, Turbo-pumps for the Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) have been realised and tested. Preparations for the testing of one of the major subsystem viz., Thrust Chamber are underway. The integrated test of the C25 Cryogenic Engine is planned for end 2011.




    L-110 test
    [​IMG]
    S-200 test
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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  8. faithfulguy
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    faithfulguy ELITE MEMBER

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    So could India procure more engines from foreign sources or India should just ground all GSLV launches if a domestic engine is not ready? I think its not very smart if it the whole program is grounded if the engine is not ready. Why not buy ones from the US or Japan?
  9. Kinetic
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    Kinetic SENIOR MEMBER

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    What problem for you in reading the news before posting? Can't you see that They will conduct GSLV mk III flight next year end while with Russian engine in first half of next year.
  10. faithfulguy
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    faithfulguy ELITE MEMBER

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    I read it but I do not assume that it will be successful. If its successful, all problems are solved. It possible that the test would fail and what should India do? Out source all the large satellite launches, import engines or do nothing until a engine is ready.
  11. Kinetic
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    Kinetic SENIOR MEMBER

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    Thats everything for you. Live with your assumption. :lol: Satellite launch does not depends on someone's assumption. Leave India to think about itself. You may further need to know that GSLV MK 1/2 were successful in 4 out of 7 but this is totally new launch vehicle.
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  12. faithfulguy
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    faithfulguy ELITE MEMBER

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    So do not assume that it will be successful before it become successful. Don't count the chickens before the eggs hatch. But because its not successful yet, the gov officials should have contingency plan if things do not go as planned. In reality, things do not go as planned. Look at the Arjun and LCA program, eventually, things will work out right. But look at how Indian military purchased all the T-90s and now the MRCA program. It shows Indian military's lack of confidence in India's own military industrial capability. Now, I'm not saying that Arjun and LCA suck. But the fact that Indian military choose something else instead of domestically produced ones says a lot. So don't assume that this new design will be successful. Its always safer to assume otherwise.
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  13. conworldus
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    conworldus FULL MEMBER

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    Both China and India have a long way to go. China's powerful engine is around 650kn, while the U.S has over 2000kn. Without large rocket it won't be possible to send heavier and more sophisticated equipment to the space. The CE20 has 200kn thrust, and is still in development. The CE7.5 hasn't had a flight yet.
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  14. ChineseTiger1986
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    ChineseTiger1986 ELITE MEMBER

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    Are you talking about the RS-68 engine?

    It is intented to be installed for the Ares V rocket, but now it has been pushed back by Obama due the lack of funds.

    BTW, China has already developed a 60 tons class LEO rocket, and the next one will be well over 140 tons. The engine is going to be close to the level of RS-68.
  15. WHITESMOKE
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    WHITESMOKE FULL MEMBER

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    Sometimes i feel "faithfulguy" is a machine or a spam who can type only one thing.." Buy from USA" .. I bet 99% posts of this guy are promotion of usa and that too in pathetic way. Do this guy has any real life or he's just in sales and promotion??
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