What's new

Tea Plantation in Pakistan

ghazi52

PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST
Joined
Mar 21, 2007
Messages
101,832
Reaction score
106
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Tea Plantation in Pakistan

National Tea Research Institute is working under the auspices of Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC) Ministry of National Food Security & Research Islamabad. It has been established in 1986 as National Tea Research Station on 50 acres of land in district Mansehra (Khyber Pakhtunkhwa) and upgraded to the level of Institute in 1996.

A research institute of Mansehra district has found that Pakistan has great potential for producing both black and green tea.

The research was aimed at increasing local tea output so that Pakistan’s dependence on the commodity’s imports could be reduced which stand at around Rs31 billion. The per-capita consumption of tea is estimated to be one kilogram a year.

Pakistan is the third-largest importer of tea in the world. It imports black tea from 19 different countries, with the major share of 60 per cent from Kenya. Green tea is mainly imported from China, Vietnam and Indonesia.

Both green and black tea varieties are processed at the National Tea and High Value Crops Research Institute (NTHRI) in Shinkiari, 18km north of the Mansehra city on the Karakoram highway.

On the recommendations of Chinese tea experts, the National Tea Research Station was set up on 50 acres in Shinkiari with technical assistance from Beijing under the auspices of the Pakistan Agricultural Research Centre (PARC). The aim was to undertake systematic research and promote tea plantation.

Based on the results from the cultivation of Chinese-origin tea crop, the station was upgraded to the level of the institute. The first black tea processing plant started working in 2001 with a daily processing capacity of one tonne.

Research has been conducted with an aim to increase the local output so that the country’s dependence on the commodity’s imports, which stand at around Rs31bn, could be reduced

At the same time, a pilot green-tea processing plant having a daily capacity of 100kg was also procured from China and installed at the Shinkiari institute.

According to officials of the tea research institute, the green and black tea processed at the NTHRI has been tested and analysed at the Hunan Tea Testing Centre and Tenfu Tea College of China.

Speaking about the current status of tea cultivation and its prospects in Pakistan, Director of the National Tea Research Institute Dr Farrukh Siyar Hamid said black tea processed at the NTHRI could not compete with the tea imported from abroad due to its orthodox processing and Chinese germplasm.

Green tea processed at the NTHRI on a small scale gave better response from the consumers in the market. The import and consumption of green tea in Pakistan is low as compared to black tea, which can be achieved within minimum period, he said.

He said that about 64,000 hectares of land has been identified as suitable for tea growing in Mansehra and Swat districts based on topography, soil and climatic data.

In Hazara, the area is located in districts of Mansehra, Battagram and Abbottabad. In Malakand, Swat is a promising area for tea cultivation.

All these areas lie in a fairly contiguous belt, nestled in the foothills of the Hamilayas in the northeast and Hindu Kush in the northwest, Dr Hamid said.

Successful tea plantation has been demonstrated at the institute as well as on fields in potential tea-growing areas of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Azad Kashmir. Its yield potential and quality has been assessed to be economically viable and the extent of the area has been identified.

An achievement of the national tea research institute is that exotic tea varieties have been acquired from China, Sri Lanka, Japan and Indonesia.

After screening, 14 varieties were found suitable for the ecological zones and tea gardens of the selected varieties have been established.

The best-known Chinese variety, Keemun, was tested under the environmental conditions of Pakistan, and the growth, production and green tea was found to be successful.

The future plan of the institute is to focus on green-tea processing as the varieties grown at the NTHRI are mainly of Chinese origin. The testing of exotic germplasm suitable for black tea in the potential tea-growing areas will be carried out.

Meanwhile, a pilot black-tea processing plant donated by Turkish state-owned tea-producing company Caykur will be used to process black tea from different varieties grown at the institute, Dr Hamid said.

The plant, which is fully automatic and can produce 400kg to 500kg of tea per day, has reached Karachi port and the documentation for its release is in the pipeline.


 
Shinkiari KPK Tea Farming


What is the scope of tea cultivation in Pakistan?

Ans.
Pakistan is the 3rd largest tea importer in the world and a huge amount of its foreign exchange (Rs.12 billion +) has to be spent on import of tea from different tea producing countries. Fortunately, a sizeable land area is available in the NWFP, which can be brought under tea plantation. Besides, savings in foreign exchange, a lot of employment opportunities can be created in the rural areas.

What research and development measures PARC has taken to promote tea cultivation?
Ans.
The research conducted at NTRI includes:

  • Survey and identification of suitable areas in the NWFP.

  • Screened suitable varieties for tea cultivation.

  • Developed production packages for the farmers.

  • Trained the progressive farmers and the officials of the extension and research wings of NWFP.

  • List of research publications available at NTRI page: (www.parc.gov.pk/ntri.html)
Has PARC developed any tea varieties?

Ans.
The following exotic germplasm has been tested at NTRI:

  • Qi-Men

  • Roupi

  • Chuye

  • Huangshun

  • High grown Sri Lanka

  • Indonesian variety
Out of these the first three varieties have been found suitable and recommend for large scale tea plantation in prospective tea growing areas. Out of total mass selection three lines have been selected and planted for further multiplication as local germplasm.

Which are the suitable areas for tea cultivation in Pakistan?
Ans. Districts of Mansehra, Battagram, Swat and AJK.

What are the major recommendations for promotion of tea cultivation in Pakistan?
Ans. The successful plantation of tea has been demonstrated, its yield potential and quality have been assessed to be economically viable, the extent of the area has been identified and finally, the production package for tea growers has been evolved. Now it is the time for practical steps to undertake tea plantation on commercial scale by involving the private sector.
 
Dr Farukh Siyar Hamid, Director National Tea and High Value Crops Research Institute (NTHRI) Shinkiari, Mansehra, told to a group of journalists who visited the institute.

He said that research work on the tea crop is complete and now it is responsibility of the federal and provincial governments to commercialize it. Hamid said that Pakistan imports black tea from seventeen countries and 72 percent of it is imported from Kenya, adding that green tea is imported from three countries and 66 percent of it is imported from China.

"It is estimated that at the end of this decade Pakistan would be the biggest importer of black tea in the world," he said, adding that the per capita consumption of tea in Pakistan is about one kilogram annually and is continuously increasing due to increase in its demand.

He said that major tea exporting countries in the world include Sri Lanka, Kenya, China, India, Indonesia, Uganda, Tanzania and Bangladesh and major tea importers include Russia, United States, Pakistan, UK and Egypt.

"The tea cultivation is a labour intensive activity and growing tea over 64,000 hectares of land would not only overcome tea import bill but will also generate employment opportunities, besides reducing poverty in the tea growing areas," he said.

Hamid said that the areas found suitable for tea cultivation in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa include districts of Mansehra, Battagram, Shangla and Swat. He said that tea is a long duration crop and it takes five years to reach complete yielding stage.

"We have encouraged and trained many farmers for tea cultivation but due to lack of funds with them to install processing units, our efforts bear no fruits and, therefore, the government needs to take steps in this regard," he said, adding that following plucking of tea leaves they should be shifted to processing unit within four hours.

The NTHRI chief said that tea crop remains productive for 70 to 100 years, generates employment opportunities, makes waste land productive, saves environment against pollution, protects soil against erosion and increases life of dams/reservoirs.

About NTHRI, he said that National Research Station was upgraded to the level of institute in 1996. In 2001 the institute set up black tea processing unit with a capacity of one ton per day and set up green tea processing unit in 2005 with the capacity of 80 to 100 kg per day.

The NTHRI was converted to National Tea and High Value Crops Research Institute (NTHRI) in 2013 and now the institute is working on fruits, vegetable, medicinal herbs, kiwi and olive plantation in addition to tae crops, he said. He said that NTHRI is spread over 50 acres of land, of which 33 acres are marked for tea garden, 2 acres for mother fruit orchard, 4.5 acres for nursery of tea, fruit, vegetable and medicinal plants as well as 10 acres for processing unit, road and buildings.

When asked about the achievement of NTHRI, he said that it conducted screening of exotic tea varieties, establishment tea garden at Dively Battal, continuation of systematic research studies, demonstration of tea crop on farmers fields in different agro-ecological zone and preparation of manual green tea. Similarly, it also established black tea and green tea processing units, conducted training of growers and supervision of students from different universities.

Hamid said that the main objectives of NTHRI include identification of potential tea growing areas, establishment of mother blocks of high value crops and training farming communities for capacity building and transfer of technologies.

59a07a19b73fd.jpg

SHINKIARI: A view of tea garden in Mansehra.

2017 : Turkey’s Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock has sent a latest automatic tea-processing plant to Pakistan as a gift in recognition of the country’s tea-growing efforts.

Talking to journalists on Friday, National Tea and High Value Crops Research Institute Director Dr Farrukh Siyar Hamid said the plant has arrived in Karachi and currently paperwork is being done for its release.

The plant, which has a capacity to process 400 to 500 kg of tea per day, would be made operational in April next year.

The plant will be set up at the tea project site located in Shinkiari, near Mansehra. Spread over 50 acres, this is Pakistan’s first tea garden where black and green tea is produced.

The existing plant at the institute was imported from China and has the capacity of producing one tonne of black tea per day and about 100kg green tea per day.

Dr Hamid said that after a series of soil surveys carried out by the institute, 158,147 acres of land suitable for tea plantation has been identified in districts of Mansehra, Battagram and Swat. The productive and cultivable land is presently not being utilised, he said.

The institute had also carried out soil surveys in Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK) where prospects emerged for the cultivation of tea. However, the forest department of AJK refused to allocate land for the project, he added.

Tea crop cultivation has been experimented on farmers’ fields in different agro-ecological zones in the three districts, he said.

The efforts to promote tea cultivation received a setback when the tea garden, spread over 186 acres, and a plant were completely destroyed in Swat during the military operation against terrorists.

The tea research institute has completed testing of 14 exotic tea germplasm and identified 13 tea clones.

In addition, the institute has developed clusters at Siran, Konsh and Kunhar valleys where sixty farmers were trained to grow tea.

Responding to a question, Dr Hamid said the tea being produced in Pakistan is much liked by the Chinese and the products have the prospects to thrive along the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor.
 
TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

  • Developed production technology and disseminated among the tea growers.

  • Imparted training to tea small tea grower for manufacturer of green tea at their field.

  • Published Urdu Brochure on “Chaye ki Kasht”.

  • Published English Brochure on An-overview of National Tea Research Institute.


04.jpg


ONGOING RESEARCH STUDIES

  • Effect of photosynthesis in tea plants under different conditions.

  • Agronomic traits of tea cuttings of selected plants/ETB in nursery.

  • Effect of foliar applied nitrogenous fertilizer on growth and yield of mature tea (Camellia sinensis L.)

  • The effect of sulphur nutrition on the growth and quality of tea (Camellia sinensis L.)

  • Effect of different level of Phosphorus on the yield of tea.

  • Radiation mutation of different tea varieties.

  • Effect of different pruning timings and levels of potash fertilizer on the recovery and growth of deeply pruned tea (Camellia sinensis L).

  • Study on intercropping of vegetables in newly planted tea.

  • Effectiveness of some additive formulated baits against rodent pests of tea in Mansehra and Battagram.


TEA RESEARCH & ADVISORY UNITS (TRAU) OF NTHRI

  • TRAU, Swat (KPK)

  • TRAU, Battagram (KPK)


Tea Plantation in Pakistan

Farmers Field (Baffa)

1958

05.jpg


PARC (Baffa)

1976-77

PARC (Battal, Dewly)

1982

PC-I (National Tea Research Station)

1984-85

Establishment of NTRS (Shinkiari)

1986

Chinese Experts for Technical Assistance

1986-89

National Tea Research Institute (NTHRI)

1996

Installation of Black Tea Processing Plant at NTHRI

2001

Installation of Green Tea Processing Plant at NTHRI
2005
 
KPK and Northern areas are the best place for tea plantation in Pakistan.
I did a tea plantation tour near ooty, India and visited a old tea processing plant built by British in late 1800s. Even though India don’t give visa to Pakistani but I got lucky and able to visit few good places.
 
Last edited:
We have to do it , we have to save 1+ billion $$$ ….. Not only this Pakistan should target all imported food items , like Pam-oil , chees , etc to save billions of $$$$ every year.
 
National Tea Research Institute


INTRODUCTION


Tea (Camellia Sinensis L.) is used as common beverage in almost all over the world. Pakistan has a long tradition in tea drinking which has become a favourite source of entertainment in the society. The per capita consumption is one kilogram. Pakistan imports all its tea requirements from abroad and, thus, the total annual import of tea was 2,60,000 m. tons in 2000 which costed about Rs. 12.0 billion to the national exchequer. Presently, Pakistan is the second largest importer of tea after United Kingdom. Demand for tea is growing day by day and in the wake of high growth rate of population (3.1% annually), Pakistan is likely to become the world's largest importer of tea by the year 2010 AD.

HISTORY OF TEA PLANT

Tea originated in China and its regular drinking began there in the 6th Century AD. It spread to Japan in 1000 AD and by the middle of 17th Century, tea has invaded Europe. In the mid 18th Century, the British started tea cultivation for the first time in their colony of India (un-divided) but it was Mr. Robert Fortune, an English Botanist who, after studying tea cultivation for 4 years in China, brought 20,000 plants in 1853 to establish tea gardens in India.


GROWTH REQUIREMENTS

Tea is a crop of wide adaptability and grows in a varying range of climates and soils in various parts of the world. Commercial tea plantation is found as far north as Georgia (42° N) and as far south as Argentina (27° S) at altitudes ranging from sea level in Japan to more than 2000m in Kenya. However the following 3 factors/requirements of tea plantation must be ensured before any decision of its commercial plantation is made:

i) Climate: Annual rainfall above 1000mm

Air temperature; 12° - 30° C

ii) Soil: pH value ranging from 4.5 to 6.5

iii) Labour: Cheap and adequate


ATTRACTIONS

Tea plants takes 3 to 4 years before it comes into production. Once established, it remains productive for well over 80 to 100 years. In addition to this, the crop has several other important attractions as compared to other traditional crops.

I) It is highly remunerative crop and no major cash crop in the world can compete it in net-return per unit area.

ii) Being a highly labour intensive, it generates a lot of employment opportunities for rural folk.

iii) Covering the ground vegetatively, it provides protection against soil erosion

iv) It brings culturable waste land under productive use.

v) After processing, it provides the world's cheapest form of beverage.

vi) Being a non-palatable crop to animals, it requires minimum care and protection against grazing animals.


HISTORY OF TEA CULTIVATION IN PAKISTAN

Tea cultivation started for the first time in the then West Pakistan (present Pakistan) in 1958 at village Baffa (District Mansehra) under the auspices of Pakistan Tea Board. These efforts could not prove fruitful for want of proper Govt. attention. This was most probably due to self-sufficiency in tea production in the then East Pakistan (present Bangladesh) and possibly due to certain political reasons. The second attempt was made in 1964 and a pilot project for irrigated tea plantation was initiated by the West Pakistan Agricultural Development Corporation at Misriot Dam near Rawalpindi, but again the efforts failed to make the desired impact on promotion of tea cultivation. The main cause of failure this time was the un-favourable soil and climatic condition for tea cultivation at the site (high soil pH with in adequate rainfall).

Soon after the separation of East Pakistan in 1971, a cell of special crops was created in the Ministry of Food and Agriculture Government of Pakistan and a project entitled "Research and Introduction of Tea in Pakistan" was re-initiated in 1973-74.Later on, the project was handed over to Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC), Islamabad. In order to carryout


Tea Garden At NTRI, Shinkiari

1.gif
Systematic studies on tea, about V/i acres of land was planted under tea in 1976-77 at village Baffa (District Mansehra). Subsequently, in 1982, a four member team of Chinese tea experts was invited under the technical co-operation programme, who surveyed the prospective tea growing areas of northern Pakistan in order to study the feasibility of tea cultivation in the country. Based on their Feasibility Report, a Collaborative Tea Research Programme was developed under which a scientist from PARC was sent to China in 1983 to study tea cultivation and its processing there. Subsequently, having observed the satisfactory growth of tea plants at Daively (District Mansehra), a contract on technical assistance for tea cultivation in Pakistan was signed between Pakistan and China for a period of 3 years commencing from April, 1985.The National Tea Research Station was established in 1986 at Shinkiari, District Mansehra. The Chinese experts visited the prospective tea growing areas again in 1988 and submitted a comprehensive report on the economic feasibility of tea cultivation in Pakistan.

NATIONAL TEA RESEARCH INSTITUTE (NTRI). SHINKIARI, MANSEHRA

building.gif
The Station was established in 1986 on 50 acres land at Shinkiari, District Mansehra aimed at undertaking systematic research for evolving tea production package and promoting tea.plantation in the prospective area. A tea garden on 30 acres land had been established with a sound infrastructure on 12 acres land for tea nursery.An adequately equipped soil laboratory and an orthodox miniature tea processing unit had been installed. At present a team of 7 trained Scientists and 2 Engineers are undertaking research on various aspects of tea cultivation and processing.



Single Node Cuttings Vs Multi Node Cuttings​

OBJECTIVES

i) To introduce/screen suitable tea varieties and establish model tea gardens.

ii) To assess yield potential and quality of made tea.

iii) To identify the extent of the area suitable for tea plantation.

iv) To evolve production package for tea growers.

v) To process both green and black tea.
vi) To study the processing of tea.


MAIN ACHIEVEMENTS

i) Screened 5 Chinese tea varieties suitable for tea plantation in the area and established tea gardens at Shinkairi, Daively and on farmer's field at different locations in districts Mansehra, Battagram and Swat.

ii) Identified 1,50,000 acres (60,000 ha) of land suitable for tea plantation in Hazara and Swat, 85% of which lies in district Mansehra (Map-l)

iii) Obtained a maximum yield of 9 tons of fresh leave (2 tons made tea) per hectare from tea bushes of 7 years age.

iv) Evaluated tea quality, which ranked 2nd best in grade at the International Tea Market, London in 1989.

v) Introduction of private companies and Private tea traders i.e. "Tapal" to hire the lands of farmers on lease basis and ultimately involving in tea plantation.

vi) Developed tea production package and published in Urdu Brochure for tea growers entitled "Chaey ki kasht".

vii) Construction of building for the installation and commissioning of tea processing plant.


FUTURE PLAN/THRUST

i) Evaluation of the production package on the farmer's field under different ecological conditions.

ii) Popularization of tea cultivation through field demonstration and Audio visuals.

iii) Training of rural population on leaf plucking and green tea processing as cottage industry.

iv) Processing, qualitative assessment and marketing of black tea.


CONSTRAINTS

i) Reluctance of farmers for tea plantation due to long gestation period (5 years) compare to other cash crops.

ii) Lack of adequate resources (manpower, transport and funds).


CONCLUSION

The successful plantation of tea has been demonstrated, its yield potential and quality have been assessed to be economically viable, the extent of the area has been identified and finally, the production package for tea growers has been evolved. Now it is the time for practical steps to undertake large scale plantation in prospective tea belt. This task of crucial economic importance could be carried out through the establishment of a statutory body .
THE PAKISTAN TEA AUTHORITY (PTA) or PAKISTAN TEA BOARD (PTA).
 
SOME INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT TEA

Tea (Camellia sinensis) is a plant which:

i) Has vast adaptability to grow in ecological systems ranging from 42°N latitude (Georgia) to 30°S latitude (Australia)and on altitudes ranging from sea level (Japan) to more than 2000 meters (Kenya).

ii) Is found an evergreen bush as well as evergreen tree (10 to 20 meter tall).

iii) Can be propagated by seed as well as vegetatively through cuttings.

iv) Flowers twice a year, once in March and then in September/October.

v) Is self sterile and requires cross-pollination for viable seeds. Is not palatable to any kind of animal.

vi) Gives both green tea (non-fermented form) as well as black tea (fermented form) from the same tea plant.

vii) Has an economic productive life of about 100 years.
 
Shinkiari KPK Tea Farming


What is the scope of tea cultivation in Pakistan?

Ans.
Pakistan is the 3rd largest tea importer in the world and a huge amount of its foreign exchange (Rs.12 billion +) has to be spent on import of tea from different tea producing countries. Fortunately, a sizeable land area is available in the NWFP, which can be brought under tea plantation. Besides, savings in foreign exchange, a lot of employment opportunities can be created in the rural areas.

What research and development measures PARC has taken to promote tea cultivation?
Ans.

The research conducted at NTRI includes:

  • Survey and identification of suitable areas in the NWFP.

  • Screened suitable varieties for tea cultivation.

  • Developed production packages for the farmers.

  • Trained the progressive farmers and the officials of the extension and research wings of NWFP.

  • List of research publications available at NTRI page: (www.parc.gov.pk/ntri.html)
Has PARC developed any tea varieties?

Ans.
The following exotic germplasm has been tested at NTRI:

  • Qi-Men

  • Roupi

  • Chuye

  • Huangshun

  • High grown Sri Lanka

  • Indonesian variety
Out of these the first three varieties have been found suitable and recommend for large scale tea plantation in prospective tea growing areas. Out of total mass selection three lines have been selected and planted for further multiplication as local germplasm.

Which are the suitable areas for tea cultivation in Pakistan?
Ans.
Districts of Mansehra, Battagram, Swat and AJK.

What are the major recommendations for promotion of tea cultivation in Pakistan?
Ans.
The successful plantation of tea has been demonstrated, its yield potential and quality have been assessed to be economically viable, the extent of the area has been identified and finally, the production package for tea growers has been evolved. Now it is the time for practical steps to undertake tea plantation on commercial scale by involving the private sector.
Below are the 15 countries that imported the highest dollar value worth of tea during 2019.
United States: US$488.4 million (8.5% of total imported tea)
Russia: $425.7 million (7.4%)
United Kingdom: $356.5 million (6.2%)
Vietnam: $249.4 million (4.3%)
Saudi Arabia: $236.6 million (4.1%)
Iran: $234.1 million (4.1%)
Morocco: $232 million (4%)
Germany: $220.5 million (3.8%)
China: $187.3 million (3.3%)
Hong Kong: $186.4 million (3.2%)
Japan: $179.8 million (3.1%)
France: $166.9 million (2.9%)
Netherlands: $153.8 million (2.7%)
Canada: $138.8 million (2.4%)
Poland: $122.8 million (2.1%)

I don't see a Pakistan in this list so how can you claim what you are claiming
 
Top trading partners (import of "Tea, whether or not flavoured.") of Pakistan in 2019:

  • Kenya with a share of 79% (392 million US$)
  • Rwanda with a share of 7.06% (35 million US$)
  • Vietnam with a share of 3.22% (15.9 million US$)
  • Tanzania with a share of 2.56% (12.7 million US$)
  • Burundi with a share of 2.3% (11.4 million US$)
  • India with a share of 1.98% (9.86 million US$)
  • Uganda with a share of 1.8% (8.93 million US$)
  • China - 4.94 million US$
  • Indonesia - 2.25 million US$
  • Malawi - 708 thousand US$


Imports structure of 0902 - Tea, whether or not flavoured. - to Pakistan in 2019 represented by the following main commodity groups:
  • 96% (480 million US$): 090240 - Tea, black (fermented) & partly fermented tea, whether or not flavoured, in immediate packings of a content >3kg
  • 3.01% (14.9 million US$): 090220 - Tea, green (not fermented), whether or not flavoured, in immediate packings of a content >3kg
  • 0.007% (36 thousand US$): 090230 - Tea, black (fermented) & partly fermented tea, whether or not flavoured, in immediate packings of a content not >3kg
  • 0.005% (29 thousand US$): 090210 - Tea, green (not fermented), whether or not flavoured, in immediate packings of a content not >3kg
Below are the 15 countries that imported the highest dollar value worth of tea during 2019.
United States: US$488.4 million (8.5% of total imported tea)
Russia: $425.7 million (7.4%)
United Kingdom: $356.5 million (6.2%)
Vietnam: $249.4 million (4.3%)
Saudi Arabia: $236.6 million (4.1%)
Iran: $234.1 million (4.1%)
Morocco: $232 million (4%)
Germany: $220.5 million (3.8%)
China: $187.3 million (3.3%)
Hong Kong: $186.4 million (3.2%)
Japan: $179.8 million (3.1%)
France: $166.9 million (2.9%)
Netherlands: $153.8 million (2.7%)
Canada: $138.8 million (2.4%)
Poland: $122.8 million (2.1%)

I don't see a Pakistan in this list so how can you claim what you are claiming
 

CPEC will help promote tea cultivation in its routes.


Dr. Abdul Waheed, director of National T & High Value Crops Research Institute (NTHRI) said that Pakistan has identified 64,000 hectares area suitable for tea cultivation on CPEC routes. He said at the time. Pakistan cultivates tea at an area of 200 hectares and by increasing this number to 64000 hectares Pakistan will not only be self-sufficient in tea but also generate investment by exporting it to other countries.
.


1611668057664.png
 
Back
Top Bottom