Chinese Air Force (PLAAF) News & Discussions

Discussion in 'Chinese Defence Forum' started by Lankan Ranger, Dec 11, 2010.

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  1. Greater China
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    PLA Air Force trained 328 female pilots

    March 09, 2012

    BEIJING, March 8 (Xinhua) -- A total of 328 female pilots have been trained by the People's Liberation Army (PLA) Air Force over the past six decades, according to figures disclosed at a ceremony held Thursday to mark the 60th anniversary of the debut flight of Chinese women pilots.

    The PLA Air Force has recruited a total of nine groups of female pilot trainees over the past 60 years, and eight of these groups have already graduated, figures show.

    Women pilots joined the flight mission of the PLA Air Force for the first time on March 8, 1952, when a group of them flew planes over the Tian'anmen Square in Beijing as a flight show.

    Since then, they have successfully completed numerous key missions in chartered flight, disaster relief, research-oriented trial flight, and afforestation by airplane sowing, and they have flown in the National Day parade air show.

    Xu Qiliang, a member of the Central Military Commission and commander of the PLA Air Force, attended the ceremony.

    People's Daily Online
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  2. SinoChallenger
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    Huitong's H-6K page updated!

    One of the H-6K (K/JH6K?) cruise missile carrier prototypes was undergoing a test flight at CFTE. This new variant first flew on January 5, 2007 at XAC. Two prototypes have been produced (861 & 862). Its major improvement is to replace two fuel-thirsty WP-8/AM-3 turbojet engines with Russian D-30KP-2 turbofan engines (TO thrust 12,000kg, similar to the engine used by Il-76MD in service with PLAAF), resulting in a greater range (30% more?) and a higher cruise speed. Around 55 D-30KP-2 engines were imported from Russia between 2009-2011. As the result the engine compartment was completely redesigned. It is believed that D-30KP-2 is being reverse-engineered as WS-18 by the Chengdu Engine Corporation. Other improvements include a redesigned solid nose housing a large ground search radar, a chin mounted FLIR/TV turret for night/poor weather missions, nose MAWS sensors, a SATCOM antenna on the top of rear fuselage, a datalink antenna on the bottom of rear fuselage, solid tail cone housing electronics with the tail gunner compartment removed, 6 underwing missile pylons and use of composite materials to reduce weight. Its cockpit has been completely redesigned featuring 6 color MFDs. The aircraft now has 3-member crew located in the forward cabin (two pilots+WSO), each equipped with a new ejection seat (HTY-6F) to improve pilot survivability. The crew can also get into/out of the cabin quickly through a side door. The internal bomb bay appears retained and no IFR probe has been found. A total of 6 large long-range cruise missiles may be carried, which might be the air-launched version of CJ-10 (CJ-10K?) cruise missile (range 2,500km, similar to Russian Kh-55). Some images suggested it may also carry a mix of different types of missiles, including the smaller KD-63 ASM. H-6K is capable of flying strategic missions with these long-range cruise missiles (armed with nuclear warheads). It also has the potential to be converted into ASW aircraft or tanker in the future. The latest images (May 2011) indicated that the first batch of H-6Ks are entering the service with PLAAF (S/N 11x9x).

    - Last Updated 3/7/12
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  3. Greater China
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    A Race of China and U.S. in air Electronic attack weapon

    2012-03-10 (China Military News cited from aviationweek.com and by David A. Fu) -- The U.S. Air Force is developing network weapons to attack aircraft.

    Electronic warfare specialists know the technology is already a double-edged sword, however. The Chinese, a senior service official says, are already working hard on, and in some cases fielding, similar systems to attack high-value aircraft used for early warning, electronic surveillance, command and control, and intelligence.

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    PLA Air Force KJ-2000 AWACS

    The Air Force is pursuing “cyber-methods to defeat aircraft,” Gen. Norton Schwartz, the service’s chief of staff, told attendees at the 2012 Credit Suisse and McAleese Associates Defense Programs conference in Washington March 8. But Lt. Gen. Herbert Carlisle, the deputy chief of staff for operations, says the same threat to U.S. aircraft already is “out there.”

    Ashton Carter, deputy secretary of defense, is pushing both offensive and defensive network-attack skills and technology. “I’m not remotely satisfied” with the Pentagon’s cyber-capabilities, Carter says.

    “The Russians and the Chinese have designed specific electronic warfare platforms to go after all our high-value assets,” Carlisle says. “Electronic attack can be the method of penetrating a system to implant viruses. You’ve got to find a way into the workings of that [target] system, and generally that’s through some sort of emitted signal.”

    The Chinese have electronic attack means — both ground-based and aircraft-mounted — specifically designed to attack E-3 AWACS, E-8 Joint Stars and P-8 maritime patrol aircraft, he says.

    Schwartz revealed no other details, but several years ago the service tested the “Suter” system, which used a data stream filled with algorithms to invade an integrated air defense (IAD) system through its antennas. The data-stream, generated by an EC-130 Compass Call electronic-attack aircraft, was able to capture the enemy network’s radar pictures, take over the network as system administrator and tap into dispersed missile launchers through their wireless communication links. Changes to or effects on the output of the enemy IAD system were monitored by an RC-135 Rivet Joint signals-intelligence aircraft.

    A fielded version of the system was used by Compass Call aircraft in Iraq and Afghanistan to tap into wireless telephone systems used to control improvised explosive devices. However, the EC-130 is a large, slow aircraft that does not fly at high altitudes, making it vulnerable to anti-aircraft guns and missile fire. So the task has become engineering a network invasion device small enough to fit into a stealthy aircraft — manned or unmanned, strike or reconnaissance — that can penetrate to a useful tactical range to attack enemy electronics and networks.

    New U.S. aircraft like the F-22, F-35, EA-18G and F/A-18E/F now carry new, long-range, active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars that are being considered as part of an electronic-attack/network-invasion capability. However, different versions of the AESA arrays are being tailored to better fit the cyber/electronic attack mission. Some will go on unmanned designs like Boeing’s Champ cruise missile, Raytheon’s MALD-J jamming missile and a line of Mk.-82 bomb shapes to carry out the electronic attack role. Other designs will be tailored for the Suter-like, network-invasion task.

    Ironically, the AESA arrays that make the new radars and electronic attack systems so formidable in range and power output also are major targets themselves for electronic attack. “From a cyber [attack] standpoint, AESA has introduced new vulnerabilities,” a veteran electronic attack specialist says. “They have a continual wide field of view that can be exploited.”

    Such new weaponry would be a boon to the Air Force if it were thrown into a campaign against Syria. “Syria has a much more demanding air defense environment” than Libya, for example, Schwartz says. “We’re watching Syria closely” as well as other places where governments are showing “erratic behavior,” he says.

    China Military News
  4. HANI
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    While women have been ferrying cargo planes for the PLAAF since its founding, they were not allowed to serve in any combat roles. Then it all changed -- since February this year, six female pilots are serving in the 28 attack division, as WSOs.

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    :china::guns:
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  5. Greater China
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    [​IMG]
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  6. persona_non_grata
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    persona_non_grata SENIOR MEMBER

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    Why do Chinese pilots march towards their aircraft? Never seen any other air force do this
  7. no_name
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    no_name ELITE MEMBER

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    That's just the old PR way I think.
    It seems unnatural to me too.
  8. Greater China
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    Greater China FULL MEMBER

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    Different country, different customs.

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    American pilots sometimes also march towards their machines, as it can be seen in the following two pictures:

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  9. Donatello
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    Donatello PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

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    What Radar is that? It resembles the AESA AN/TPS 77 radar....recently acquired by PAF.
  10. Greater China
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    [​IMG]

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  11. Greater China
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    [​IMG]

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  12. Armstrong
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    I'm going to marry a Chinese !
  13. SinoChallenger
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    Chinese general criticizes certain people in the aviation industry by comparing them unfavorably to the aerospace industry, saying that they relied too much on foreign technology and failed to innovate -- methinks he is talking about SAC.

    ??·??ú??_??·??ú??_?_?
  14. SinoChallenger
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    According to Chinese reports, Y20 transport (50 ton payload) will fly this year and begin mass production next year!

    This means China's high bypass engine is finally ready and we will soon be able to make civilian airliners too.
  15. pakje
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    Only one year of testing?