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Chinese PLA issues individual soldier Integrated Combat System for the troops in Xinjiang and Tibet border regions

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Chinese PLA issues individual soldier Integrated Combat System for the troops in Xinjiang and Tibet border regions

The Chinese army has issued their troops with a new “Individual Soldier Digital Combat System,” including a helmet equipped with an antenna,multi-functional and night goggles. The system also includes a portable digital command terminal, allowing soldiers on the front lines to communicate with commanders at the battalion level via radio.

Through the use of a camera-equipped jacket, commanders are also able to see the front-line soldiers in real-time, providing them with a greater level of situational awareness and control. This advanced technology is being used in Xinjiang and Tibet border regions.

The soldiers who are equipped with this system include those in Special Forces, platoon infantry and artillery, aviation, and armoured divisions. When the commander sees footage of the situation, they can order artillery fire coverage.
 
PLA soldiers in high plateau regions now are equipped with compact carry-on portable oxygen machines, which great helps the soldier with high altitude movement capabilities and fight altitude sickness.

 

China’s Super Soldier ‘Augmented Reality’ Headset & Corner Shot Weapon Surfaces; Can It Better US Tech?​

January 26, 2023

China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) soldiers were seen using a wearable heads-up display and shooting their rifles around corners by accessing the sighting system view on their visors, in a different form of a ‘corner shot’ system.

Featured on a promotional news feature by its military-affiliated media and a defense technology publication, the system is helpful but still risks going the way of two such programs by the US Army that did not fare well technologically and financially.

Called Augmented Reality systems, those devices are like the land-based versions of the helmet-mounted displays worn by fighter pilots that project all the flight information and data on the visor.

But the Chinese video also showed the AR systems double up as a ‘corner shot’ weapon, where the firer can have the gun sight’s perspective on his eyes, opening up a host of possibilities for flexible shooting.

The New Corner Shot?

The video shows Chinese infantrymen – possibly special operations personnel – loading the magazines of their QBZ-95 standard assault rifles.

After firing a few rounds off their pistols and rifles, the soldiers are seen wearing different visors under their helmets. One soldier peeps out the gun from the corner and shoots over and around an obstacle. This indicates that the gun’s digital targeting reticule view can also be seen on the AR goggles.


This ‘corner shot’ mode is vastly different than the one invented by retired Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) Lt Col Amos Golan, which required manipulating a lever on a large adapter kit that accommodated a pistol. This was to turn it in various directions.

A pop-out screen in the other half of the kit transferred images from the optical sight connected to the pistols. It found instant utility in counter-terrorism, hostage rescue, and urban warfare scenarios and was adopted by many security and police agencies worldwide.


However, the Chinese AR system looks more flexible in terms of allowing a larger weapon, like an assault rifle, that fires a bigger round. Moreover, installing the gun does not require an adapter kit, making quick target acquisition easy.

Whether the system is exclusively meant for shooting around corners or is a larger information-sharing device that connects the shooters to drones, command and control centers, and drones is unknown. But it is unlikely that even if it is a testing prototype, China will use one only for ‘corner shooting.’

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Expert Speak

Col. Bipin Shinde (retd) agreed the system has its advantages. “Various combinations of information, from battlefield radars, drones, UAVs, satellite imagery, can be fed to the head-up display.” But he also warns of “information overload,” mainly if not correctly structured, “which may become a hindrance.”

“Also, over-dependence on AR systems might completely disrupt functioning if it is destroyed or malfunctions,” he adds. The Chinese system might be a testing prototype, not a final design, just sent to operational units for feedback.
 

China’s military unveils heads-up display to let soldiers shoot around corners

BY JARED KELLER | PUBLISHED JAN 27, 2023 4:11 PM
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A Chinese soldier with a Military Augmented Reality System (MARS) headset and digital optic attached to his QBZ-95 service rifle. (PLA).

The Chinese military is stepping up its augmented reality game with a new pair of digital goggles that will purportedly allow soldiers to aim and fire their weapons from behind cover.

The Eurasian Times reports that China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) soldiers were spotted testing the heads-up displays — which appear to be variants of the Military Augmented Reality System (MARS) headset —and associated weapons optics in a recent promotional video from a PLA-affiliated defense technology publication that was published this year.


The footage shows Chinese soldiers with sleek visors wielding QBZ-95 service rifles with digital weapons scopes. In one scene, a soldier fires from around a wall while another fires with his rifle over his head from behind cover, with both ostensibly using information projected on their heads-up displays to identify and engage targets (the video does not offer any indication if their fire was, in fact, effective and on target).

The MARS system appears to closely resemble the U.S. Army’s Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS), the do-it-all goggles that have been undergoing intensive testing for the last several years.

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A Chinese soldier with a Military Augmented Reality System (MARS) headset and digital optic attached to his QBZ-95 service rifle. (PLA)

The appearance of an augmented reality headset in the hands of the PLA isn’t surprising: the Chinese military has been incorporating augmented and virtual reality systems into their training regimens for several years now, employing synthetic training environments for everything from parachute training to missile exercises.

But the Chinese military is clearly a few years behind existing U.S. military technology in terms of its tactical applications. Indeed, American soldiers have been shooting around corners for years thanks to recent developments with the U.S. Army’s standard-issue night vision goggles and a fresh weapons optic.

The service’s new Enhanced Night Vision Googles-Binoculars (ENVG-B) and Family of Weapons Sights-Individual (FWS-I) — developed by the Army to fuse standard night vision with thermal scanning during nighttime operations — offers similar functionality to soldiers, feeding the image from an FWS-I optic mounted on an M4 carbine or M249 Squad Automatic Weapon into an ENVG-B system for picture-in-picture targeting.

“The ENVG-B wirelessly operates with the FWS-I to provide Rapid Target Acquisition (RTA) capability,” according to the Army’s fiscal year 2023 budget request. “RTA is the capability to view the boresighted/zeroed weapon sight reticle in the ENVG-B display, enabling the soldier to accurately engage targets without having to bring the weapon to eye level and without the use of active lasers, all while remaining in defilade.”

It’s unclear how much the MARS replicates the picture-in-picture view of the ENVG-B/FWS-I combo that the Army is currently fielding. Video circulated on Twitter in late December appeared to show the view through a MARS heads-up display system during testing.

The use of the MARs headset in PLA training materials may not bode well for the near-peer competition between the U.S. and China as the two countries seek to modernize their militaries ahead of the next big war. But still, if the MARS is anything like the IVAS, then there’s an outside chance that Chinese troops may hate it enough to reject it entirely.

 
This ‘corner shot’ mode is vastly different than the one invented by retired Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) Lt Col Amos Golan, which required manipulating a lever on a large adapter kit that accommodated a pistol. This was to turn it in various directions.
Corner shot system is old, back when it was developed, augmented reality technology was not possible.

ENVG-B is being produced by Elbit. ENVG-B are way more than just augmented reality goggles that show you the aiming reticle of the gun. They are the best (And probably only) thermal-night vision hybrid goggles in existence.



US had non-thermal version in the commercial market for years already.
 
Corner shot system is old, back when it was developed, augmented reality technology was not possible.

ENVG-B is being produced by Elbit. ENVG-B are way more than just augmented reality goggles that show you the aiming reticle of the gun. They are the best (And probably only) thermal-night vision hybrid goggles in existence.



US had non-thermal version in the commercial market for years already.
Now China has it too. China didn’t say they invented it, they are just closing the gap in multiple fronts.
 
Now China has it too. China didn’t say they invented it, they are just closing the gap in multiple fronts.
They don't. Having an AR is one thing, having such advanced AI powered hybrid thermal optics is another.
 
I’m sure they’re gonna let you decide what they have or not.
It doesn't matter. It's very easy to see how most of the Chinese soldier is armed.
No optics, no NVGs, most soldiers running around with no kneepads. They are very poorly equipped from a western viewpoint.
 
It doesn't matter. It's very easy to see how most of the Chinese soldier is armed.
No optics, no NVGs, most soldiers running around with no kneepads. They are very poorly equipped from a western viewpoint.
What would you say would be the additional equipment they would need for a Taiwan invasion scenario, if the invasion force is 300-500,000 strong?
 
What would you say would be the additional equipment they would need for a Taiwan invasion scenario, if the invasion force is 300-500,000 strong?
hmm, we have will and money, so I guess it's everything, from personal equipment to aircraft carrier.
 
It doesn't matter. It's very easy to see how most of the Chinese soldier is armed.
No optics, no NVGs, most soldiers running around with no kneepads. They are very poorly equipped from a western viewpoint.
China is known for her capability to mass produced anything, in real war scenario , it's be you runnig around naked without China's supply chain.
 
It doesn't matter. It's very easy to see how most of the Chinese soldier is armed.
No optics, no NVGs, most soldiers running around with no kneepads. They are very poorly equipped from a western viewpoint.
You see what they let you see.
 
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