What's new

Xinjiang Province: News & Discussions

KingMamba

ELITE MEMBER
May 23, 2012
12,388
7
19,201
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
And so they attacked China? You sure make a lot of sense.

The Hui Muslims of China outnumber the Uighur and they are all patriotic Chinese. The main motive behind the ETIM is to seperate because they say they are Turks and not Chinese. The movement was encouraged by the Soviets after the split from the Chinese in the cold war but after they failed the first time around (defeated by a Hui Muslim general no less) they reorganized and started to play the religion card to get into Afghanistan to train when the Taliban were in control. As you know the Taliban supported anyone who was Muslim so they let them in. After 2001 they were bombed into oblivion when we invaded so they are weak now but some may still be in North Waziristan, Pakistan. Yet even today they do not find sympathy from many Muslim countries for many reasons mainly

-Everyone knows they are actually in an ethnic battle with the Chinese so only Turkic nations support them (by support I mean moral although covert who knows).

-Most Muslim countries want good relations with China because US is viewed suspiciously and the Chinese are seen as a counter weight.

-Lastly the Uighurs have a different Islamic jurispudence than most other "movements" whereas most movements are Wahabbi/Salafi the Uighurs are Sufi militants and so the countries that would otherwise happily donate to Wahabbi groups *cough ksa qatar cough* are not so obliging towards them.

@Armstrong @Chinese-Dragon @ChinaToday
 
Last edited by a moderator:

IBRIS

BANNED
Oct 8, 2009
2,696
-1
1,890
_67203128_china_xinjiangedit23042013.gif


Clashes in China's restive Xinjiang region have left 21 people dead, including 15 police officers and officials, authorities say.

The violence occurred on Tuesday afternoon in Bachu county, Kashgar prefecture.

The foreign ministry said it had been a planned attack by a "violent terrorist group", but ethnic groups questioned this.

There have been sporadic clashes in Xinjiang in recent years.

The incidents come amid rumbling ethnic tensions between the Muslim Uighur and Han Chinese communities. In 2009 almost 200 people - mostly Han Chinese - were killed after deadly rioting erupted.

Continue reading the main story
Analysis

Celia Hatton
BBC Beijing correspondent
Nothing is stopping foreign journalists from booking flights to Xinjiang after hearing reports of violence there. However, simply travelling to the region doesn't guarantee the ability to dig out the truth behind this story.

In 2009, dozens of foreign reporters were permitted to join an official tour of Urumqi, the capital of Xinjiang, after clashes between minority ethnic Uighur residents and majority Chinese Hans killed 197 people.

Their experiences were mixed. Some reporters were able to speak to a variety of people on the ground, while others faced harassment and intimidation.

The situation remains the same today. Reporters who travel to the area are closely followed by government minders. Locals often hesitate to answer questions, fearing reprisals from government authorities.

Uighur exile groups often provide accounts that differ from the official Chinese government reports. Reconciling the two can be tricky.

The situation isn't any easier for Chinese journalists. China's propaganda departments have warned domestic news outlets against conducting their own independent reporting on sensitive Xinjiang stories, ordering them to reprint official stories from China's major state news agencies.

It is very difficult to verify reports from Xinjiang, reports the BBC's Celia Hatton.

Foreign journalists are allowed to travel to the region but frequently face intimidation and harassment when attempting to verify news of ethnic rioting or organised violence against government authorities.

'Terrorism'
Hou Hanmin, director of the Xinjiang government's propaganda department, said Tuesday's clashes began as officials described as community workers searched homes for weapons.

She told the BBC's Chinese service that three of the workers were killed as they were investigating reports of suspicious individuals at the home of a local resident.

Unarmed police then arrived to investigate the workers' earlier reports and were attacked, said Ms Hou. Three "thugs" died and nine police officers were cornered in a house which was then set on fire, she said, calling the incident a "planned terrorist attack" on innocent victims.

There was no information on the identity of the assailants. Ten of the officials and police killed were ethnic Uighurs, the local authorities said.

Eight people were arrested.

Foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said initial police investigations showed it had been "a premeditated attack carried out by a violent terrorist group".

She said the security situation in Xinjiang was "good in general, but a small cluster of terrorist forces are still doing their very best to upset and sabotage Xinjiang's stability and development".

"I believe their plan goes against the will of the people and is doomed to fail," she told a news conference.

But Dilxat Raxit, a spokesperson for the World Uighur Congress, an umbrella organisation of Uighur groups, told the BBC the incident was caused by the killing of a young Uighur by Chinese "armed personnel" as a result of a government clean-up campaign.

Uighurs make up about 45% of the region's population, but say an influx of Han Chinese residents has marginalised their traditional culture.

Beijing authorities often blame violent incidents in Xinjiang on Uighur extremists seeking autonomy for the region. Uighur activists, meanwhile, accuse Beijing of over-exaggerating the threat to justify heavy-handed rule.

In March, 20 people were jailed on terrorism and separatism charges in the region. Last August courts jailed another 20 people on similar charges in Xinjiang.

Uighurs and Xinjiang


- Uighurs are ethnically Turkic Muslims
- They make up about 45% of the region's population; 40% are Han Chinese
- China re-established control in 1949 after crushing short-lived state of East Turkestan
- Since then, large-scale immigration of Han Chinese
- Uighurs fear erosion of traditional culture

BBC News - China's Xinjiang hit by deadly clashes
 

IBRIS

BANNED
Oct 8, 2009
2,696
-1
1,890
Mystery clouds deadly clash in western China with 'suspected terrorists'

Some say that Beijing deliberately exaggerates the terrorist threat in order to justify the iron grip it keeps on the Muslim majority province of Xinjiang in western China.

0424-uighur-china-muslim-xinjiang_full_600.jpg

A woman looks up as a dust storm hits Kashgar, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, last week. Xinjiang, once a predominantly Muslim province in China's far west, has seen massive settlement by ethnic Han immigrants in recent decades.

Reuters


BEIJING
Mystery surrounds official Chinese reports Wednesday of a violent clash between “suspected terrorists” and the authorities in the restive Muslim province of Xinjiang yesterday that left 21 people dead, including 15 officials.

According to a statement on the provincial government website, a group “planning to conduct violent terrorist activities” armed with knives seized three local officials who had surprised them in a house near the city of Kashgar (see map).

They then killed the three hostages and 12 of the policemen and local community workers who came to the rescue, setting fire to the house before armed police regained control of the situation, killing six of the suspects and arresting eight of them, the statement said.

The Chinese authorities have given only sketchy details of the incident, and have not accused any particular group of responsibility. Beijing has previously blamed Islamist separatists for earlier violent attacks on officials.

Xinjiang, once a predominantly Muslim province in China’s far west, has seen massive settlement by ethnic Han immigrants in recent decades. Local people complain that their culture and language are being eroded and that Han now outnumber original inhabitants, who are ethnic Uighurs, with linguistic and cultural ties to central Asian peoples.

Violence flares sporadically, despite a stiflingly heavy handed police and army presence. In 2009 almost 200 people were killed – mostly ethnic Han – in deadly rioting in the provincial capital of Urumqi. Last month the government announced that courts in Xinjiang had sentenced 20 men to prison terms as long as life for plotting Jihadhi attacks.

The men “had their thoughts poisoned by religious extremism,” according to the Xinjiang provincial website, and had “spread Muslim religious propaganda.”

Determining the truth behind such allegations, and incidents such as Tuesday’s clash, is difficult. Chinese media are not allowed to carry reports other than those by the state-run news agency Xinhua and foreign reporters have found themselves restricted and harassed when trying to work in Xinjiang.

A leading Uighur activist, Dilxat Raxit, who lives in Germany, questioned the official account, telling the AP that local residents had reported that the police sparked the incident by shooting a Uighur youth during a house search.

It was not clear how the suspects, armed only with knives, had managed to kill 15 policemen and local officials before they were subdued.

China has often accused a shadowy group known as the East Turkestan Islamic Movement of being behind violence in Xinjiang, but foreign observers are dubious, with some saying that Beijing deliberately exaggerates the terrorist threat in order to justify the iron grip it keeps on Xinjiang.

The US State Department put the group on its terrorist watch list in 2002, but has since removed it amid doubts about whether the group is a real organization.
 

Speeder 2

SENIOR MEMBER
Mar 24, 2010
2,407
-10
3,499
Country
Netherlands
Location
United Kingdom
Last edited by a moderator:

qwerrty

SENIOR MEMBER
May 12, 2010
3,747
-12
9,474
The US State Department put the group on its terrorist watch list in 2002, but has since removed it amid doubts about whether the group is a real organization.

lol them americans believe chechen wackos are no terrorists too, but..

apbostonbombinginsetnt1.jpg
 

Executioner

FULL MEMBER
Jun 15, 2011
420
0
157
RIP

I think main issue is most of them are illiterate and they are easy to motivate to do any kind of work in name of Allah. They are empty vessel nothing to anything and anyone can fill few words and little bit brainwashing. Even they blow them-self.
 

Speeder 2

SENIOR MEMBER
Mar 24, 2010
2,407
-10
3,499
Country
Netherlands
Location
United Kingdom
RIP to the victims.

Have any of the criminals been linked to a terrorist organization or cause. Is it related to the Xinjiang issue, or a case of common criminals?

a case of common criminals is sth of picking pockets, oke? or stealing a iphone, or even robing a bank... Common criminals don't kill, particularly no jewries, money, drugs, etc involved. Sorry but is this common sense?

... and

a case of common criminals doesn't invlove killing that many, a truck load!, for NO reason. for fun? for after-dinner exercice? ...particularly while the whole nation is busy at helping the relief of the unfortunate eathquake victums.

It's blantant twisted hatred to the extent of outright slaughtering, of anything, anyone in slight, in the name of i dunno what!!!

A jihad that is? Inspired by Boston?

"A case of common criminals"? come again?



--May the victums RIP.
 

canadian icehole

FULL MEMBER
Sep 7, 2011
490
0
283
P.S We still don't know whether it was the ETIM in this case or not & as I observed earlier on - Knives, a single firearm & axes don't really seem like the weapons of choice for Al-Qaeeda linked Militants ! Either our cooperation is working out better than we - on the outside - know or these weren't Muslim Extremist as opposed to being just disgruntled Uighurs that got caught by the security forces & decided to retaliate with knives, axes & a gun !

My understanding is that it's very difficult to get a hold of firearms in China. You make do with what you can get your hands on.


Sounds like a confrontation started by overzealous "community workers" who decided to enter and search private property because "suspicious" Uighurs lived there. In any case , it is a case of gang violence at worst, not planned terrorism.

The word terrorism is so broad it can just about cover everything; organized crime (i.e. Mafia, drug lords) can be considered "terrorists".


They sound like morons. Using knives, however long, against police with modern weapons?

Show up to a gun fight with a knife? :lol: However, I've heard most police officers fear criminals with knives than guns.


I agree with you totally. All sane people can see logic in this. It has been proven many times that converted people become more fanatic then the people who converted them...

+1 This behaviour isn't just confined to religion.
 

Gandhi G in da house

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 5, 2010
9,488
-24
11,103
Country
India
Location
India
The Hui Muslims of China outnumber the Uighur and they are all patriotic Chinese. The main motive behind the ETIM is to seperate because they say they are Turks and not Chinese. The movement was encouraged by the Soviets after the split from the Chinese in the cold war but after they failed the first time around (defeated by a Hui Muslim general no less) they reorganized and started to play the religion card to get into Afghanistan to train when the Taliban were in control. As you know the Taliban supported anyone who was Muslim so they let them in. After 2001 they were bombed into oblivion when we invaded so they are weak now but some may still be in North Waziristan, Pakistan. Yet even today they do not find sympathy from many Muslim countries for many reasons mainly

-Everyone knows they are actually in an ethnic battle with the Chinese so only Turkic nations support them (by support I mean moral although covert who knows).

-Most Muslim countries want good relations with China because US is viewed suspiciously and the Chinese are seen as a counter weight.

-Lastly the Uighurs have a different Islamic jurispudence than most other "movements" whereas most movements are Wahabbi/Salafi the Uighurs are Sufi militants and so the countries that would otherwise happily donate to Wahabbi groups *cough ksa qatar cough* are not so obliging towards them.

@Armstrong @Chinese-Dragon @ChinaToday

Sufi militants ? Never heard this before :undecided:
 
Last edited by a moderator:

KingMamba

ELITE MEMBER
May 23, 2012
12,388
7
19,201
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States

sur

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 19, 2009
2,740
4
3,188
Xinjiang terrorist attack kills 15 - People's Daily

Chinese officials used the word "Jihad" multiple times.

The link you posted doesn't use that word even once. It's YOU who are using it, NOT genuine Chinese whom I am friends with.

You are a brain-washed Chinese, not a genuine one. Hence you keep referring to religion just like ur Western masters... Genuine Chinese are wise NOT to mention religious belonging of criminals, unlike YOU You are mentally-enslaved to Western propaganda & when a Chinese girl in Boston is killed by American-agencies, you think Muslims did it... DO NOT MENTION RELIGIOUS BELONGING OF A CRIMINAL. Your Chinese fellows understand it very well, you don't. Since u r a mental-slave to propaganda, Chinese are NOT... That's the whole point. :)


...Xinjiang terrorist attack kills 15 - People's Daily...Chinese officials used the word "Jihad" multiple times. But I guess you think that is a conspiracy too?


Yes it is "conspiracy" that they used the word "Jihad" multiple times -&- you are the conspirator here, against ur own media... Even if u were right, here, I use the word "mental-slave" multiple times for you,,,
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"
"Chinese-Dragon is a mental-slave"


So are you a mental slave since I repeated that so many times???

-
-
-

Group was accused of collecting illegal knives .... :undecided:
& when your beloved masters create synthetic-terrorism & al-CIAdah double-agents, of course many copy-cats might think of themselves as lions & collect "knives" in their house... You know "knives"... & when you raid a house full of knives, the resulting fight can result in loss of lives... Oh look! they rhymed...

-
-
-

See genuine Chinese understand what I've been saying all along.
They don't use the word "Jihad", "Islam", "Muslim", "Islamic", etc

(LINK) - "community workers found several suspicious persons and knives"
(Link) - "Three community workers discovered suspicious individuals and knives"
(Link)
(Link)
(Link) - older news but no labeling of religion by genuine Chinese.
(Link)




& here's a quote from link posted by Fateh71:
"Officials and state media blame the unrest on "terrorists" but some experts say the government has produced little evidence of an organised terrorist threat, adding the violence stems more from long-standing local resentment."

Unrest in China's Xinjiang kills 21 people: local official - Channel NewsAsia
Atleast this news item does not suggest a terrorist attack, but a police raid that went violent and the police claiming the people raided were plotting terrorist acts.

By-the-way as I write, I am watching a Chinese TV channel "Dragon TV" ur name sake. :) Don't understand a word. Just watching ... There's some Chinese serial on...
 

Chinese-Dragon

RETIRED TTA
Jul 9, 2010
33,975
52
71,006
Country
China
Location
China
Sur, I feel you are having a breakdown, so I'll make my post again:


------------------



Xinjiang terrorist attack kills 15 - People's Daily

Whereas the international media don't want to use the word "terrorist" in their headlines, but pay attention to the quotes from Chinese officials:

Violence in western Chinese region of Xinjiang kills 21 - CNN

Some of the knives recovered by police were more than a meter long, according to Hou Hanmin, spokesperson for the Xinjiang government. She told CNN that some of the captured assailants said under interrogation that they had watched videos "from overseas" that featured violence and acts of terrorism.

"Then they made those large, lethal knives and wanted to use them for Jihad," she said, referring to the Arabic term meaning "struggle."

"They had been training in their own house for several months. They were affected by extremism and hoped to commit themselves to Jihad."

Chinese officials used the word "Jihad" multiple times.

P.S. To clarify Sur... it was Hou Hanmin, official spokeswoman for the Chinese Government, who mentioned the word "Jihad" multiple times.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom