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11 million in 10 days: China may test all of Wuhan amid fears of virus comeback


BEIJING -- Authorities in Wuhan, the Chinese city where the coronavirus pandemic first broke out, are planning to test all 11 million residents in the next 10 days, Chinese media reported.

No official announcement has been made, but district officials confirmed receiving marching orders from the city's coronavirus task force, the reports said. It remained unclear if and how such a monumental testing campaign would happen.

The short order came after the discovery last weekend of a cluster of six infected people at a residential compound in the city, the first new cases in more than a month. China has moved quickly to snuff out new outbreaks wherever they pop up, even as it relaxes restrictions on the movement of people and reopens public attractions to limited numbers of visitors.



Jilin province, which borders North Korea in China's northeast, has suspended all public transport and imposed other restrictions as it battles a fresh outbreak. In neighbouring Heilongjiang province, which dealt with its own outbreak recently, the city of Harbin is quarantining anyone coming from Jilin for 14 days and banning them from hotels.

The sudden order appeared to confuse local officials. A man who answered the mayor's hotline in Wuhan said that districts have 10 days to arrange the testing in their respective jurisdictions. But a woman who answered later Wednesday said the tests must be done in the next 10 days.

A major state-owned news website, Jiemian, said it had obtained an implementation plan for the city's Wuchang district that said all residents should be tested by May 20, or in about a week's time.

Wuhan was the area hit hardest by the coronavirus in China. Of the 4,633 reported deaths nationwide, 4,512 were in Hubei province, including 3,869 in Wuhan, the provincial capital.

China imposed a lengthy lockdown on most of Hubei in late January to stem the spread of the virus. People were forbidden from entering or leaving the province, public transportation suspended and residents were mostly restricted to their homes.

The lockdown was lifted outside of Wuhan after two months, and in Wuhan itself on April 8, after 2 1/2 months.

The new cases appear to have shocked city officials into action. They dismissed the Communist Party secretary of the neighbourhood where the cluster was found for poor management of the residential community, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

The order said the testing should focus on the elderly, densely populated areas and those with mobile populations, according to the media reports. It wasn't clear if that meant only some people would be tested or if they would be prioritized.

One expert at Wuhan University told the Global Times newspaper that 3 to 5 million residents have already been tested, which could leave 6 to 8 million others for a citywide test.

In Beijing, a shorter-than-usual ban on drone use in the Chinese capital is being interpreted as a signal that China will curtail its major political meeting of the year because of continuing concern about the outbreak.

Police said Wednesday that the use of drones, balloons, gliders and other low-flying objects will be banned for nine days, from May 20 to May 28. Such bans are common during major events.

The National People's Congress usually happens over two weeks in March but was postponed this year because of the coronavirus outbreak. It is scheduled to start on May 22, so it may last just one week.

Some participants in a recent preparatory meeting joined by video conference, sparking speculation that some of the 3,000 delegates may do so at the Congress itself.

new life under fears of covid 19.
life under new normal,from corona virus uncertain future ahead.
 

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11 million in 10 days: China may test all of Wuhan amid fears of virus comeback


BEIJING -- Authorities in Wuhan, the Chinese city where the coronavirus pandemic first broke out, are planning to test all 11 million residents in the next 10 days, Chinese media reported.

No official announcement has been made, but district officials confirmed receiving marching orders from the city's coronavirus task force, the reports said. It remained unclear if and how such a monumental testing campaign would happen.

The short order came after the discovery last weekend of a cluster of six infected people at a residential compound in the city, the first new cases in more than a month. China has moved quickly to snuff out new outbreaks wherever they pop up, even as it relaxes restrictions on the movement of people and reopens public attractions to limited numbers of visitors.







A similar problem may have emerged in Germany, where four municipalities are trying to contain new outbreaks of more than 50 new infections for every 100,000 inhabitants within seven days





Jilin province, which borders North Korea in China's northeast, has suspended all public transport and imposed other restrictions as it battles a fresh outbreak. In neighbouring Heilongjiang province, which dealt with its own outbreak recently, the city of Harbin is quarantining anyone coming from Jilin for 14 days and banning them from hotels.

The sudden order appeared to confuse local officials. A man who answered the mayor's hotline in Wuhan said that districts have 10 days to arrange the testing in their respective jurisdictions. But a woman who answered later Wednesday said the tests must be done in the next 10 days.

A major state-owned news website, Jiemian, said it had obtained an implementation plan for the city's Wuchang district that said all residents should be tested by May 20, or in about a week's time.

Wuhan was the area hit hardest by the coronavirus in China. Of the 4,633 reported deaths nationwide, 4,512 were in Hubei province, including 3,869 in Wuhan, the provincial capital.

China imposed a lengthy lockdown on most of Hubei in late January to stem the spread of the virus. People were forbidden from entering or leaving the province, public transportation suspended and residents were mostly restricted to their homes.

The lockdown was lifted outside of Wuhan after two months, and in Wuhan itself on April 8, after 2 1/2 months.

The new cases appear to have shocked city officials into action. They dismissed the Communist Party secretary of the neighbourhood where the cluster was found for poor management of the residential community, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

The order said the testing should focus on the elderly, densely populated areas and those with mobile populations, according to the media reports. It wasn't clear if that meant only some people would be tested or if they would be prioritized.

One expert at Wuhan University told the Global Times newspaper that 3 to 5 million residents have already been tested, which could leave 6 to 8 million others for a citywide test.

In Beijing, a shorter-than-usual ban on drone use in the Chinese capital is being interpreted as a signal that China will curtail its major political meeting of the year because of continuing concern about the outbreak.

Police said Wednesday that the use of drones, balloons, gliders and other low-flying objects will be banned for nine days, from May 20 to May 28. Such bans are common during major events.

The National People's Congress usually happens over two weeks in March but was postponed this year because of the coronavirus outbreak. It is scheduled to start on May 22, so it may last just one week.

Some participants in a recent preparatory meeting joined by video conference, sparking speculation that some of the 3,000 delegates may do so at the Congress itself.

new life under fears of covid 19.
life under new normal,from corona virus uncertain future ahead.

A similar problem may have emerged in Germany, where four municipalities are trying to contain new outbreaks of more than 50 new infections for every 100,000 inhabitants within seven days – the threshold for a local return to lockdowns announced by the chancellor

A similar problem may have emerged in Germany, where four municipalities are trying to contain new outbreaks of more than 50 new infections for every 100,000 inhabitants within seven days – the threshold for a local return to lockdowns announced by the chancellor




The Wuhan cluster has been traced to an 89-year-old man who developed a fever on March 17 but recovered at home within 10 days without seeing a doctor.

He started to have health issues again last month, and last week he was confirmed as having the coronavirus. His wife and two other elderly couples in the compound also tested positive for the virus.


There have been other prolonged cases similar to the man’s case, said Wu Zunyou, chief epidemiologist at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Actually, there is more than one such case in Wuhan; the course of disease could last 30 to 50 days for some patients,” Wu said in an interview with state broadcaster CCTV. “The virus could take longer to manifest itself in patients with weak immunity, who are also prone to ‘ons’ and ‘offs’ of symptoms.”

A similar problem may have emerged in Germany, where four municipalities are trying to contain new outbreaks of more than 50 new infections for every 100,000 inhabitants within seven days – the threshold for a local return to lockdowns announced by the chancellor






The Wuhan cluster has been traced to an 89-year-old man who developed a fever on March 17 but recovered at home within 10 days without seeing a doctor.

He started to have health issues again last month, and last week he was confirmed as having the coronavirus. His wife and two other elderly couples in the compound also tested positive for the virus.


There have been other prolonged cases similar to the man’s case, said Wu Zunyou, chief epidemiologist at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Actually, there is more than one such case in Wuhan; the course of disease could last 30 to 50 days for some patients,” Wu said in an interview with state broadcaster CCTV. “The virus could take longer to manifest itself in patients with weak immunity, who are also prone to ‘ons’ and ‘offs’ of symptoms.”





They all lived in the Sanmin compound in the East West Lake district of Wuhan, which Chinese leader Xi Jinping visited in March during his first trip to the city since the outbreak began.
 
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A similar problem may have emerged in Germany, where four municipalities are trying to contain new outbreaks of more than 50 new infections for every 100,000 inhabitants within seven days – the threshold for a local return to lockdowns announced by the chancellor






The Wuhan cluster has been traced to an 89-year-old man who developed a fever on March 17 but recovered at home within 10 days without seeing a doctor.

He started to have health issues again last month, and last week he was confirmed as having the coronavirus. His wife and two other elderly couples in the compound also tested positive for the virus.


There have been other prolonged cases similar to the man’s case, said Wu Zunyou, chief epidemiologist at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Actually, there is more than one such case in Wuhan; the course of disease could last 30 to 50 days for some patients,” Wu said in an interview with state broadcaster CCTV. “The virus could take longer to manifest itself in patients with weak immunity, who are also prone to ‘ons’ and ‘offs’ of symptoms.”







They all lived in the Sanmin compound in the East West Lake district of Wuhan, which Chinese leader Xi Jinping visited in March during his first trip to the city since the outbreak began.
It doesn't belong to this section...needs to be in COVID19 sub forum
 

Baghial

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It doesn't belong to this section...needs to be in COVID19 sub forum

ok thanks, but can u merge in app section?

How The Novel Coronavirus Hijacks Our Defenses

..
One way the novel coronavirus can make humans very sick happens deep inside our lungs — a deadly dance between the virus and our immune systems run amok. KQED's Deep Look video team put together a primer to help explain how that happens.

Viruses hijack human cells

Viruses are simply genetic material wrapped in a layer of protein and fat. They exist in a gray zone between life and death — active inside a living host, powerless out in the open, then able to rise again in another host.

"Outside the cell, the virus is basically waiting to attach to another cell," says Dr. Melanie Ott, a virologist at the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco.


SHOTS - HEALTH NEWS
How Long Does It Take To Recover From COVID-19?

"The purpose of a virus is to persist," Ott says. Viruses do so by infecting and commandeering human cells — basically making each host cell into a "mini virus-producing machine," she says. From there, new virus particles spread.

Ott says the coronavirus has found a particularly good home in humans; it's able to cause less severe symptoms in many people, sometimes even being spread by those who are unaware they are carrying it.

"It's actually one step ahead of us in the way that it spreads relatively undetected in some people," she says. That allows this virus to "multiply and persist much longer than other deadly viruses."

An individual virus particle, called a virion, is invisible to the naked eye. It would take roughly 1,000 coronavirus particles to span the width of a human hair.

The virus spreads on moisture droplets through the air or on surfaces, eventually finding its way inside our bodies — typically through the eyes, nose or mouth.


SHOTS - HEALTH NEWS
Think You've Got COVID-19? Here's What Doctors Say About When To Seek Help

The coronavirus packs a vicious double punch: It can infect the entire respiratory system, all the way down to millions of tiny air sacs in the lungs called alveoli.

"There aren't a lot of respiratory viruses that go both upper and lower, and this is one of them," says Dr. Michael Schivo, a pulmonologist at UC Davis Health. "No. 1, [the novel coronavirus] can make us sicker. And No. 2, it can cause low oxygen."

Alveoli make up 99% of the surface area of the lung, and they keep people alive by delivering oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream and moving carbon dioxide from the blood to the lungs, so that gas can be exhaled.

When particles of the coronavirus enter the alveoli, they continue to replicate, injuring the lungs.

How our immune cells help us, but sometimes amplify damage

Inside the alveoli are immune cells called macrophages, which act as sentinels for the lungs. They're "waiting to fight off the cigarette smoke or pollution or anything else," says Dr. Michael Matthay, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

These macrophages act as first responders, Schivo says. "They recognize danger, and they try to get rid of it." If the body needs more help, it recruits more immune cells — white blood cells called neutrophils.


SHOTS - HEALTH NEWS
Why Some COVID-19 Patients Crash: The Body's Immune System Might Be To Blame


GOATS AND SODA
How Ebola Kills You: It's Not The Virus

Sometimes, however, the immune system goes haywire during the battle, throwing relentless resources at the virus and wreaking more havoc than repair. This immune system overreaction is called a cytokine storm.

This two-pronged attack — from the virus and from our immune system's explosive response — makes some cases of the coronavirus deadly.

In the worst-case scenario, the walls of the alveoli begin to break down.

Fluid rushes from the blood vessels into the alveoli in these severe cases, filling up the tiny air sacs and blocking the exchange of gases. When this happens, the body can't excrete enough carbon dioxide or absorb enough oxygen. It becomes much more difficult to breathe.

These lung injuries can lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome, a condition that develops when fluid fills many alveoli on both sides of the lungs. ARDS is what kills most people who die from COVID-19.

To prevent those deaths and severe illness, scientists around the world are working simultaneously on treatments and — the ultimate hope — a protective vaccine.

"There's no reason to think we can't generate a vaccine," says Luis P. Villarreal, professor emeritus at the School of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. "Then it will be controlled just like measles was, and it can be eradicated if you choose to really implement it on a large scale. It would be difficult, but it could be eradicated."

This story and video were produced by our friends at Deep Look, a science video series from KQED and PBS Digital Studios that explores "the unseen at the very edge of our visible world." KQED's Jenny Oh is digital media producer for the series; health reporter Laura Klivans is the series' host. Additional reporting by Gabriela Quirós and Annie Roth.













How Ebola Kills You: It's Not The Virus
..

Ebola has a nasty reputation for the way it damages the body. It's rightfully earned.

"At the end stage of the disease, you have small leaks in blood vessels," says Thomas Geisbert, an immunologist at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. "You end up with essentially no blood pressure. Your body temperature drops and you go into shock."



But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of an Ebola infection, a surprising fact surfaces: The virus isn't what ends up killing you. It's your own immune system.

"The normal job of the immune system is to eliminate infections," says virologist Christopher Basler, at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. "But when it's activated at extreme levels or it's out of control, it becomes damaging to the host."

The most extreme immune attack is the "cytokine storm." Although many viruses, like bird flu and SARS, can trigger this shock and awe assault, Ebola is probably the best at it. And at the end of an Ebola infection, it's the cytokine storm that kills you, Basler says.



What Are Cytokines?
Immune cells use cytokines to communicate with each other. Cytokines are small molecules released by cells into the blood. And they can trigger a cornucopia of activities. Cytokines can make immune cells rush to the site of infection, gobble up sick cells and even sneak through blood vessel walls. Cytokines can also activate inflammation, which causes damaged tissue to swell, heat up and hurt.

In essence, a cytokine storm is an SOS signal that causes the immune system to launch its entire arsenal of weapons all at once. This last-ditch, kamikaze attack hurts the virus. But it leaves behind tons of collateral damage. Blood vessels take the brunt of it.

"The cytokine storm makes the blood vessel walls more permeable," Basler says. So the arteries, veins and capillaries start to leak blood and plasma.

The storm also triggers a big release of nitric oxide, which thins out the blood and damages vessels further.

All these factors combine together to reduce blood pressure to dangerous levels, Geisbert says. "So you don't die of blood loss, but from something similar to severe septic shock."

So how does Ebola trick the immune system into launching the cytokine storm?


GOATS AND SODA
Ebola In The Skies? How The Virus Made It To West Africa

To answer that, we have to back up to the moment when the virus enters the blood. Ebola immediately zeroes in on and infects cells of the immune system, says virologist Gaya Amarasinghe, of Washington University in St. Louis.

One target is dendritic cells. During less dangerous infections, say from a cold, dendritic cells gobble up the virus and then instruct other immune cells to make antibodies tailored specifically to this particular virus.

The antibodies then stick onto the virus' surface and stop it from infecting more cells. This is how we clear out viruses from our blood.

But Ebola is way more sophisticated than a cold. Ebola tiptoes quietly into dendritic cells and essentially shuts off their alarm system. So the immune system doesn't know it should make antibodies to Ebola.

The body is left wide open, with no protection. Then Ebola starts copying itself like crazy, Amarasinghe says. "Multiple viruses can even invade a single cell," he says. "HIV can't even do that."

All hell breaks loose in the blood. The virus grows uncontrollably and infects many organs. Eventually, cells start dying and exploding.

That's when the immune system goes haywire.

"There's lot's of premature cell death and destruction," Amarasinghe says. So you get necrotic tissue. Dying cells release all their contents into the blood. And these signals eventually trigger the "cytokine storm," he says.

"The immune system is doing way more damage than good at this point," Amarasinghe says. In other words, our bodies' response to Ebola is often too too much, too late — and frequently fatal.


 

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The preliminary results of Spain's ambitious epidemiological study with 60,983 participants show that only 5% of people have antibodies against #COVID19. This demonstrates that we must continue to be extremely cautious in lifting the measures put in place to stop the virus.
 

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11 million in 10 days: China may test all of Wuhan amid fears of virus comeback


BEIJING -- Authorities in Wuhan, the Chinese city where the coronavirus pandemic first broke out, are planning to test all 11 million residents in the next 10 days, Chinese media reported.

No official announcement has been made, but district officials confirmed receiving marching orders from the city's coronavirus task force, the reports said. It remained unclear if and how such a monumental testing campaign would happen.

The short order came after the discovery last weekend of a cluster of six infected people at a residential compound in the city, the first new cases in more than a month. China has moved quickly to snuff out new outbreaks wherever they pop up, even as it relaxes restrictions on the movement of people and reopens public attractions to limited numbers of visitors.





Jilin province, which borders North Korea in China's northeast, has suspended all public transport and imposed other restrictions as it battles a fresh outbreak. In neighbouring Heilongjiang province, which dealt with its own outbreak recently, the city of Harbin is quarantining anyone coming from Jilin for 14 days and banning them from hotels.

The sudden order appeared to confuse local officials. A man who answered the mayor's hotline in Wuhan said that districts have 10 days to arrange the testing in their respective jurisdictions. But a woman who answered later Wednesday said the tests must be done in the next 10 days.

A major state-owned news website, Jiemian, said it had obtained an implementation plan for the city's Wuchang district that said all residents should be tested by May 20, or in about a week's time.

Wuhan was the area hit hardest by the coronavirus in China. Of the 4,633 reported deaths nationwide, 4,512 were in Hubei province, including 3,869 in Wuhan, the provincial capital.

China imposed a lengthy lockdown on most of Hubei in late January to stem the spread of the virus. People were forbidden from entering or leaving the province, public transportation suspended and residents were mostly restricted to their homes.

The lockdown was lifted outside of Wuhan after two months, and in Wuhan itself on April 8, after 2 1/2 months.

The new cases appear to have shocked city officials into action. They dismissed the Communist Party secretary of the neighbourhood where the cluster was found for poor management of the residential community, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

The order said the testing should focus on the elderly, densely populated areas and those with mobile populations, according to the media reports. It wasn't clear if that meant only some people would be tested or if they would be prioritized.

One expert at Wuhan University told the Global Times newspaper that 3 to 5 million residents have already been tested, which could leave 6 to 8 million others for a citywide test.

In Beijing, a shorter-than-usual ban on drone use in the Chinese capital is being interpreted as a signal that China will curtail its major political meeting of the year because of continuing concern about the outbreak.

Police said Wednesday that the use of drones, balloons, gliders and other low-flying objects will be banned for nine days, from May 20 to May 28. Such bans are common during major events.

The National People's Congress usually happens over two weeks in March but was postponed this year because of the coronavirus outbreak. It is scheduled to start on May 22, so it may last just one week.

Some participants in a recent preparatory meeting joined by video conference, sparking speculation that some of the 3,000 delegates may do so at the Congress itself.

new life under fears of covid 19.
life under new normal,from corona virus uncertain future ahead.

Where is the link to your post
 

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