What's new

Why US Seal Team can't target Snowden- Abbottabad raid ?

VelocuR

SENIOR MEMBER
Jun 4, 2009
6,210
5
7,258
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
How Edward Snowden's Russia Move Explodes the Myth of American Dominance

Washington became powerless to do anything to the NSA whistleblower after Russia granted him asylum.



August 2, 2013 |

So what is the "extremely disappointed" Obama administration, the Orwellian/Panopticon complex and the discredited US Congress to do? Send a Navy Seal Team 6 to snatch him or to target assassinate him - turning Moscow into Abbottabad 2.0? Drone him? Poison his borscht? Shower his new house with depleted uranium? Install a no-fly zone over Russia?

Edward Snowden, under his new legal status in Russia, simply cannot be handed over to Bradley Manning's lynch mob. Legally, Washington is now as powerless as a tribal Pashtun girl facing an incoming Hellfire missile. A President of the United States (POTUS) so proud of his constitutional law pedigree - recent serial trampling of the US constitution notwithstanding, not to mention international law - seems not to have understood the message.

Barack Obama virtually screamed his lungs out telling Russian President Vladimir Putin he had to hand him Snowden "under international law". Putin repeatedly said this was not going to happen.

Obama even phoned Putin. Nothing. Washington even forced European poodles to down Bolivian President Evo Morales's plane. Worse. Moscow kept following the letter of Russian law and eventually granted temporary asylum to Snowden.

The Edward Snowden saga has turned the Pentagon's Full Spectrum Dominance doctrine on its Hydra-head. Not only because of the humbling of the whole US security state apparatus, but also for exploding the myth of Full Spectrum Dominance by POTUS.

Obama revealed himself once again as a mediocre politician and an incompetent negotiator. Putin devoured him as a succulent serving of eggs benedict. Glenn Greenwald will be inflicting death by a thousand leaks - because he is in charge of Snowden's digital treasure chest. And Snowden took a taxi and left the airport - on his own terms.

Layers and layers of nuances have been captured in this fascinating discussion at Yves Smith's blog - something impossible to find across Western corporate media. For POTUS, all that's left is to probably boycott a bilateral meeting with Putin next month, on the sidelines of the G20 summit in St Petersburg. Pathetic does not even begin to explain it.

I did it my way

What a boost for good literature; Snowden spent most of his time in airport transit reading Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, a collection of Chekhov stories, a history of the Russian state by 19th century historian Nikolai Karamzin - and learning the Cyrillic alphabet.

He did take a taxi to the bright side when he left Sheremetyevo, alongside Sarah Harrison of WikiLeaks. He may have gone to a FSB safehouse - with zero chance of the CIA's Moscow station finding him, although his lawyer said he would choose his place of residence and form of protection. His father Lon may soon visit. Even self-described "pole-dancing superhero" girlfriend Lindsay Mills may soon resurface.

How he must have relished to close the nerve-racking waiting game by having the last word - as in his statement published by WikiLeaks; "Over the past eight weeks we have seen the Obama administration show no respect for international or domestic law, but in the end the law is winning. I thank the Russian Federation for granting me asylum in accordance with its laws and international obligations."

Snowden is legally allowed to work - and has already received a job offer, by the founder of Vkontakte (Russia's Facebook), Pavel Durov, to be a member of his "all-star security team". By 2018 he will be entitled to Russian citizenship. He promised Putin he won't leak "information that may harm the US" - the key condition for the asylum request to be granted. But then he does not have to; Greenwald has everything since those heady initial days in Hong Kong. What's Washington to do? Turn Greenwald's apartment in Rio into a Pashtun wedding party?

The timing could not have been more dramatic. Snowden finally landed in Russia immediately after Greenwald revealed the details of XKeyscore - once again stressing how US public opinion, US media and the cosmically inept US Congress had no clue about the full extent of the NSA's reach. "Constitutional checks and balances", anyone?

There's got to be a serious glitch with the collective IQ of these people. The Obama administration as well as the Orwellian/Panopticon complex are in shock because they simply cannot stop death by a thousand leaks. The Roving Eye is among those who suspect the NSA has no clue about what Snowden, as a systems administrator, was able to download (especially because someone with his skills can easily delete traces of access). Even the top NSA robot - General Keith Alexander - admitted on the record the "no such agency" does not know how Snowden pulled it off. He could have left a bug, or infected the system with a virus. The fun may have not even started.

How Edward Snowden's Russia Move Explodes the Myth of American Dominance | Alternet
 

VelocuR

SENIOR MEMBER
Jun 4, 2009
6,210
5
7,258
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Snowden is not a terrorist like bin laden was.
Wrong answer. Read it.

Why the U.S. hasn't nabbed Edward Snowden yet



As surveillance whistleblower Edward Snowden hopscotches across the globe to avoid extradition to the United States, some wonder how mighty America could ever fail to catch its most famous fugitive.

But experts suggest that the intense public interest in the former National Security Agency contractor is helping him stay free, at least for now.

"This is a case where there are mixed feelings, so the United States is walking a tightrope, I think, with a lot of its own people who are really upset by what they've just found out," said Albert Berry, a professor emeritus in international economics at University of Toronto's Munk School for International Studies.

"The United States government probably doesn't want to appear very aggressive in this case, because their back is weak, so to speak."

Snowden, 30, has spent the last month in Hong Kong after leaking details about a secretive U.S. surveillance system called Prism that sifts through huge troves of phone and online data.

On Sunday, the U.S. fugitive wanted on espionage charges flew to Moscow, in what was described as the first leg in a journey to Ecuador.

But when Snowden failed to get on a connecting flight to Cuba as expected, U.S. authorities and media outlets around the world began wondering where the American was and what his plans actually were.

On Tuesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin revealed that Snowden was still in Moscow airport's transit zone. He said the country doesn't have an extradition treaty and won't be acquiescing to a U.S. request to hand the fugitive over.

NSA leaker Edward Snowden in Moscow airport transit zone

The U.S. has amplified pressure on the already tense relationship between the countries. Russia said on Tuesday it would not accept any blame over Snowden's efforts to evade prosecution in the U.S.

"We consider the attempts to accuse the Russian side of violating U.S. laws, and practically of involvement in a plot, to be absolutely groundless and unacceptable," said Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.

Meanwhile, China on Tuesday denied it helped Snowden get out of its province of Hong Kong.

"The United States' criticism of China's central government is baseless. China absolutely cannot accept it," said Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying.

Espionage charges pose a problem

So far, though, American pressure has reaped little in the Snowden case.

Reports suggest the U.S. government has spent nearly 10 days seeking action by Hong Kong, a special administrative region of China, on the Snowden case, asking it early on to provisionally arrest him in anticipation of his extradition. The U.S. also revoked his passport.

But on Sunday, Snowden flew safely to Moscow. Asked for an explanation, Hong Kong officials blamed the process for his escape, saying the U.S. failed to "comply with legal requirements under Hong Kong law."

White House spokesman Jay Carney said he didn't "buy" the technical issue, but by that point U.S. officials were focused on pressuring Russia to hand over Snowden.

Media reports suggest the U.S. could have requested an Interpol red notice, essentially an international arrest warrant sent out to all member countries, but espionage charges are considered political, a domain that Interpol avoids.

Snowden is charged under the 1917 Espionage Act with unauthorized communication of national defence information and wilful communication of classified intelligence, but he also faces the non-political charge of theft of government property.
Political charges help Snowden

The political nature of the key charges could also help Snowden skirt extradition treaty agreements.

Ecuador, Snowden's apparent destination, has an extradition treaty with the U.S., but it includes an exception for crimes or action of a political nature.

Vancouver-based extradition lawyer Gary Botting suggested that the official agreements between countries to transfer suspected or convicted criminals are often subject to the political climate.

"Extradition is always ultimately a political decision," said Botting.

On the other hand, the lawyer noted that even if Snowden lands in a country where there is no extradition treaty, that nation could negotiate a diplomatic solution for the single case.

But the public outrage and the politicization of the case currently works in Snowden's favour, ensuring countries are far more hesitant to acquiesce to the U.S. demands.

"The more it is politicized, the more likely it is that the country where he ends up will say, 'Well, we can't extradite him, because you're trying to extradite him for a political purpose or for a political reason or for a political crime,'" added Botting.

An online petition calling for the U.S. to fully pardon Snowden had by early Monday surpassed the threshold of 100,000 signatures necessary to secure an official response.

Botting said that the U.S. needs an overhaul of its strategy if it expects to succeed with extradition.

"If the United States wants him back, they're going to have to minimize the political part of it and stick to the legalities of it and be very persuasive of the minister of justice wherever he ends up," said Botting.
Nothing to lose for Ecuador

Ecuador, meanwhile, said Monday that it had received a request for asylum from Snowden, but had not yet decided what to do.

University of Toronto professor Berry said Ecuador is a small country, but one determined lately to defy the U.S., sometimes for domestic political gain.

"They don't feel they have a great deal to lose," said Berry, since Ecuador is not economically linked to the U.S.

Ecuador President Rafael Correa's left-wing government has railed against American imperialism and given the boot to a U.S. airbase in the country.

As well, Berry notes that any country willing to help Snowden will be regarded well by the general public. "They're kind of tapping into a lot of support around the world," he said.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has spent the last year holed up in London in the safety of the Ecuadorian Embassy, where he was granted diplomatic asylum.
Watch your back

Amnesty International said Monday that no matter where Snowden lands, he has a right to seek asylum due to a "well-founded fear of persecution" he'd face in the U.S.

Even if the asylum bid fails, Widney Brown, senior director of international law and policy at Amnesty International, said "no country can return a person to another country where there is a substantial risk of ill-treatment."

Last year, the UN special rapporteur on torture said the American government used cruel and inhumane treatment toward Bradley Manning, the U.S. soldier arrested for allegedly passing classified material onto WikiLeaks, for holding him in solitary confinement for nearly a year.

Then again, some say trouble could find Snowden wherever he goes.

"It's not a James Bond world out there," said Botting, but he suggests that the deeper Snowden gets into the spy vs. spy world, the more care he'll need to take.

"You have to watch your back."

Why the U.S. hasn't nabbed Edward Snowden yet - Canada - CBC News
 

Capt.Popeye

ELITE MEMBER
Apr 5, 2010
11,940
12
14,912

kurup

ELITE MEMBER
Jun 10, 2012
10,566
-2
12,836
Country
India
Location
India
Abbottabad style raid to target Snowden will not happen because of the simple reason that Russia is not pakistan .
 

SQ8

ADVISORS
Mar 28, 2009
35,491
413
74,861
Country
United States
Location
United States
LOLLLLL
Even the title of the thread is amusing in the extreme:
Why US Seal Team can't target Snowden- Abbottabad raid ?
Source: http://www.defence.pk/forums/world-...et-snowden-abbottabad-raid.html#ixzz2b64DHbgS

The answer is just too simple. Snowden is no Osama Bin Laden, and Russia is no Pakistan , and Moscow cannot be Abbottabad!
On a lighter side, the impregnable Moscow was actually breached by a german named Mathias Rust.. in a cessna 172.
BBC News - Mathias Rust: German teenager who flew to Red Square

So perhaps the Americans really did overkill in Pakistan when a cessna was all that is was needed to break into Moscow.
 

VelocuR

SENIOR MEMBER
Jun 4, 2009
6,210
5
7,258
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
So Indians are here, maybe they feel confident if Snowden decide in India or some villages area. Don't you think it is perfect place US wouldn't raid him?

Absolutely Russia is not Pakistan which willing to give permission to do dirty works for America.
 

GR!FF!N

ELITE MEMBER
Apr 11, 2012
8,706
-4
8,478
Country
India
Location
India
On a lighter side, the impregnable Moscow was actually breached by a german named Mathias Rust.. in a cessna 172.
BBC News - Mathias Rust: German teenager who flew to Red Square

So perhaps the Americans really did overkill in Pakistan when a cessna was all that is was needed to break into Moscow.
most likely they(US SEALS) don't want to be jailed in Pakistan..they wanted to kill Osama,and fly back..

by the way,US didn't going to kill as it'll put not only US-Russia relation at risk,as well as will put USA into further controversial position..
 

Capt.Popeye

ELITE MEMBER
Apr 5, 2010
11,940
12
14,912
On a lighter side, the impregnable Moscow was actually breached by a german named Mathias Rust.. in a cessna 172.
BBC News - Mathias Rust: German teenager who flew to Red Square

So perhaps the Americans really did overkill in Pakistan when a cessna was all that is was needed to break into Moscow.
Thanks for the heads-up @Oscar. I do remember that incident, the Soviet Apparatchik was not amused. The Marshal i-c of the Air Defences paid for it. Probably with a 'one-way ticket' to a Gulag.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom