What's new

Why I am resisting the Vaccines: A Personal Take!

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
5,505
19
8,831
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
without Vaccination 0.03 % would have died.

The death rate from Covid were already known by the summer of 2020. It was already known that younger and/or healthy people had extremely low chance of dying from Covid. The focus should have been targeted vaccinations, coming up with good treatments, building up the capacity of medical facilities, not ruining the economy, AND allowing the Natural Immunity as the major weapon against the virus. But stupid people thought that they could come up with a one-size fits all solution: Come up with vaccines in less than a year and vaccinate 8 billion. A failed strategy which didn't take into account the economy, the human psychology, the logistics, let alone looking into statistics from the SARS-Cov-1 and also the survival rates in different population groups from SARS-COV-2.

Now everyone I talk to here in America--and I was out in a larger city yesterday meeting random people-- the conclusion is that we are stuck with this forever and that we won't constantly take the vaccines and boosters and that we will live our lives without restrictions--the people included vaccinated people too.
 

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
5,505
19
8,831
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Some encouraging and new findings from the prestigious medical journal The Lancet and this more tends to corroborate my position about the Natural Immunity. Of course even this article doesn't give a seal of approval to the Natural Immunity by questioning the duration and strength of the Natural Immunity but those questions are very much applicable for vaccination as well. In fact, per my understanding, one out of five re-infections in Germany these days are the vaccinated ones!

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(21)00676-9/fulltext


The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is now better controlled in settings with access to fast and reliable testing and highly effective vaccination rollouts. Several studies have found that people who recovered from COVID-19 and tested seropositive for anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies have low rates of SARS-CoV-2 reinfection. There are still looming questions surrounding the strength and duration of such protection compared with that from vaccination.
We reviewed studies published in PubMed from inception to Sept 28, 2021, and found well conducted biological studies showing protective immunity after infection (panel). Furthermore, multiple epidemiological and clinical studies, including studies during the recent period of predominantly delta (B.1.617.2) variant transmission, found that the risk of repeat SARS-CoV-2 infection decreased by 80·5–100% among those who had had COVID-19 previously (panel). The reported studies were large and conducted throughout the world. Another laboratory-based study that analysed the test results of 9119 people with previous COVID-19 from Dec 1, 2019, to Nov 13, 2020, found that only 0·7% became reinfected.

In a study conducted at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, OH, USA, those who had not previously been infected had a COVID-19 incidence rate of 4·3 per 100 people, whereas those who had previously been infected had a COVID-19 incidence rate of 0 per 100 people. Furthermore, a study conducted in Austria found that the frequency of hospitalisation due to a repeated infection was five per 14 840 (0·03%) people and the frequency of death due to a repeated infection was one per 14 840 (0·01%) people. Due to the strong association and biological basis for protection, clinicians should consider counselling recovered patients on their risk for reinfection and document previous infection status in medical records.


Although those studies show that protection from reinfection is strong and persists for more than 10 months of follow-up, it is unknown how long protective immunity will truly last. Many systemic viral infections, such as measles, confer long-term, if not lifelong, immunity, whereas others, such as influenza, do not (due to changes in viral genetics).

We are limited by the length of current reported follow-up data to know with certainty the expected duration that previous infection will protect against COVID-19. Encouragingly, authors of a study conducted among recovered individuals who had experienced mild SARS-CoV-2 infection reported that mild infection induced a robust antigen-specific, long-lived humoral immune memory in humans.

It important to note that antibodies are incomplete predictors of protection. After vaccination or infection, many mechanisms of immunity exist within an individual not only at the antibody level, but also at the level of cellular immunity.

It is known that SARS-CoV-2 infection induces specific and durable T-cell immunity, which has multiple SARS-CoV-2 spike protein targets (or epitopes) as well as other SARS-CoV-2 protein targets. The broad diversity of T-cell viral recognition serves to enhance protection to SARS-CoV-2 variants, with recognition of at least the alpha (B.1.1.7), beta (B.1.351), and gamma (P.1) variants of SARS-CoV-2.

Researchers have also found that people who recovered from SARS-CoV infection in 2002–03 continue to have memory T cells that are reactive to SARS-CoV proteins 17 years after that outbreak. Additionally, a memory B-cell response to SARS-CoV-2 evolves between 1·3 and 6·2 months after infection, which is consistent with longer-term protection. Some people who have recovered from COVID-19 might not benefit from COVID-19 vaccination.

In fact, one study found that previous COVID-19 was associated with increased adverse events following vaccination with the Comirnaty BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine (Pfizer–BioNTech).

In addition, there are rare reports of serious adverse events following COVID-19 vaccination. In Switzerland, residents who can prove they have recovered from a SARS-CoV-2 infection through a positive PCR or other test in the past 12 months are considered equally protected as those who have been fully vaccinated.

Although longer follow-up studies are needed, clinicians should remain optimistic regarding the protective effect of recovery from previous infection. Community immunity to control the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic can be reached with the acquired immunity due to either previous infection or vaccination. Acquired immunity from vaccination is certainly much safer and preferred. Given the evidence of immunity from previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, however, policy makers should consider recovery from previous SARS-CoV-2 infection equal to immunity from vaccination for purposes related to entry to public events, businesses, and the workplace, or travel requirements.
NK has received consulting fees from
 

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
5,505
19
8,831
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
So today I learned that I don't have to be vaccinated because of the Remote nature of my work; otherwise, by mid January 2022, I would lose my job which I love a lot. Phew! And, yes, I was almost certain to walk away from the job instead of getting the vaccine. The Lancet study I posted above is yet more confirmation of what I had thought of the pandemic, at least where it pertains to me.
 

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
5,505
19
8,831
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Today I had my Annual Physical Exam with my Primary Care doctor. Good to do that for chit-chats and to get the insurance company reward for such checkups--at least for the younger, healthy people like me. I know I am sort of bragging ;) Anyway, the doctor asked me if I had taken the vaccine. I said No. Then I gave him my Covid antibodies history, per the OP I have given here. He said it is 'insane' that Natural Immunity is not being factored in Covid policies! He also said he has seen evidence that Natural Immunity is 'good'. I asked him if he is authorized to write a letter for me to be able to join the 'privileged-vaccinated' part of the population as a fellow immune person--I was sarcastic, of course. He said he could write such a letter but that would be nothing in the real world because CDC policies prevail.
 

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
5,505
19
8,831
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
I have taken my two shots and that's it.
No booster shot or crap.

Don't be so sure. Here is a damning latest report about how even young, healthy college students are forced to study from home, presumably because they and/or the staff have not taken the boosters. Testing 'positive



Colleges move exams online, urge boosters as coronavirus cases rise and omicron fears grow
Cornell, Georgetown, George Washington universities among schools to detect omicron variant

...
At Cornell University, where cases of the omicron variant have been confirmed and many more are suspected, more than 1,100 students tested positive for the virus this week. The spike led school officials to switch final exams online, close libraries, and call off activities, including a ceremony for December graduates.
...

At Cornell, where 97 percent of students are vaccinated, recent days have been startling.

...
amid an uptick of cases at Howard University, leaders are urging students to get booster shots. Sixteen students, all fully vaccinated, recently tested positive, officials said Tuesday evening. None of the students have experienced severe symptoms.
 

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
5,505
19
8,831
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
I will give my update so people make informed decisions about their own choices.
Over the New Year Eve celebrations, I attended indoor parties with hundreds, if not thousands of people. Unmasked and there were no Vaccine Passport checks nor even advice for Social Distancing. I did that knowing that Omicron is raging. BUT I had and continue to have faith in my immune system to tackle the Corona Virus.

So have I got the Covid? Hard to say, I have a mild sore throat and some cough especially when lying in bed. But that could well be the seasonal flu/cold which affects colder regions of America and this year, for the first time in 11 years, I have not taken the flu shot.

I believe ALL of us are eventually going to get Covid regardless of the vaccination status . And I am not advising people to go and get the Virus to get the Natural Immunity. But I am again saying, what I said in the OP, I don't need the vaccine for myself knowing my excellent health status and knowing my Natural Immunity status.

I believe it would be almost IMPOSSIBLE for me to not have gotten some massive dose of the Virus during the New Year Eve parties. But I also think subjecting myself to endless cycles of vaccines and boosters every few months was going to likely exact some moderate to very serious costs on my health even if they manifest in long term.

I am confident I will be fine from the latest exposure but if I will not be, then it was a choice I had made for myself.
 

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
5,505
19
8,831
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
I have recovered from the sore throat and cough, which could have been the common cold. And I believe my Natural Immunity has beaten back the massive exposure to the Omicron, which is raging in my area. The NYE party I attended had literally hundreds of unmasked partiers in indoor setting. Here is a pic from the party. I took it.

NYE_PARTY.jpg
 

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
5,505
19
8,831
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
At long last even the CDC is admitting the power of Natural Immunity!! And of course nobody should intentionally get the infection but 100+ million Americans had the infection and were still made to isolate, wear mask, take the jabs and the boosters.
Lying, anti-science, politicized CDC!! Glad I didn't trust them. And, no, if we with Natural Immunity fended off Delta then Omicron is a small fry. I am here to prove that, see above posts!


"
Previous infection with the coronavirus appeared to provide stronger protection against the Delta variant than did vaccination in a large sample of patients, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Wednesday.

But there are significant health risks to infection, and in the long term, vaccination still offers the best defense against the virus, the researchers said.

The data were gathered before the widespread rollout of booster shots and the emergence of the Omicron variant, so the findings may not be relevant to the current surge, the agency cautioned.

“These findings cannot be generalized to the current Omicron wave,” Benjamin Silk, an epidemiologist at the C.D.C., told reporters on Wednesday. “It’d be like comparing apples and oranges.”
"
 

Song Hong

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 4, 2020
3,341
-21
4,810
Country
Viet Nam
Location
Singapore
I am not rejecting vaccine. But I am not against the antivax although I think they are stupid and not good in maths, or just cooking statistic.

The reasons are, we have been seeing US government injecting syphillis, bioweapon or radioactive agents to do live human trial on their lowest strata population and oversea, using BS such as vaccine...etc.

The Blacks in US are fervent antivax.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom