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Why expats don’t want to live in India

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Forum' started by Shahzaz ud din, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. Shahzaz ud din

    Shahzaz ud din SENIOR MEMBER

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    Why expats don’t want to live in India

    Sonam Joshi| TNN | Sep 9, 2017, 06:04 IST

    [​IMG]

    Women expats feel they are unwelcome in India

    A survey of 12,500 expats around the world has ranked India as among the 10 worst countries to live and work in. India secured the 57th position among 65 countries, falling eight places from its rank in 2016.
    Despite giving good ratings for high salaries and low living costs, expats in the country struggled with pollution, long working hours, culture shock, personal safety concerns, poor family life and below-par quality of life.
    The annual Expat Insider survey covers respondents from 166 nationalities living in 188 countries. The country also fails to get a thumbs-up from women expats: more than half (nearly 52%) said that they feel unwelcome here due to their gender. In this respect, it ranked among the bottom five along with Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Japan. Around 31% of female respondents moved to India for their partner's job or education.
    Though 47% had a postgraduate degree or PhD and another 37% had a bachelor's degree, nearly a third stayed at home to look after the household. This could be possibly due to the fact that 47% of expat mothers found it difficult to find childcare in India.
    This year, India's ranking fell 10 places to 39 out of 45 countries in the Family Life Index, largely because of limited options for children's education. Around 29% of expat parents were unhappy with education in the country, with 54% sending their kids to international schools and 54% also finding education difficult to afford.
    India also ranked last in the Family Well-Being subcategory. India also performed poorly in the Working Abroad Index, with a rank of 49 among 65 countries. Nearly three in every 10 expats in India were unhappy with their work-life balance, probably due to long working hours, with expats on full-time jobs clocking in 47.7 hours per week, three hours more than the global average.
    Before moving to India, nearly 36% of respondents believed it would have a negative impact on their personal safety. This did not change upon their arrival, with 29% being unhappy with security. However, India's low cost of living and high salaries work in its favour, with the country getting a high ranking of 9 in the Personal Finance index. The country also wins points for its friendliness.

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    We should thank the 60 years of neglect by Congress for turning India into an open toilet!
    Sunder Swami

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/i...w/60433029.cms
     
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  2. ashok321

    ashok321 ELITE MEMBER

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    Modi made it even worse:

    rapefinal.png

    Who will come here to work and live?
    Are there not better places on this earth?
     
  3. a.kumar

    a.kumar FULL MEMBER

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    Yes Before that India was great place to work as per Rankings
     
  4. ashok321

    ashok321 ELITE MEMBER

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    Before or after, its India. Period.
     
  5. AZ1

    AZ1 SENIOR MEMBER

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    Increasing of rapes for woman expats should be one of the biggest reason for them.
     
  6. SingaporeGuy

    SingaporeGuy FULL MEMBER

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    A nuclear powered "space super power" that cannot guarantee safety for her people.

    what kind of bullshit country is this?

    This country name starts with a capital "I"
     
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  7. a.kumar

    a.kumar FULL MEMBER

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    Which Nuclear Powered Space Super Power has No Crime Records as per Indian Population Size ?
     
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  8. takeiteasy

    takeiteasy SENIOR MEMBER

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    The NRI Sanghis and HSS are eager for Hindu Rashtra and spread terror in India and mostly funds it. But, they don't want to live in their Cow's own country and Hindu Rashtra rather wants to live in the land where they eat cow meat and despise pagans.
     
  9. SingaporeGuy

    SingaporeGuy FULL MEMBER

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    hey hey china a communist nation is safer den a democratic nation
     
  10. lastone

    lastone BANNED

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    Thats accdng to the news that the commies allow to filter out.
     
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  11. Laozi

    Laozi SENIOR MEMBER

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    Why These NRIs Chose to Return to India After Years Abroad


    Being Indian turned out to be so much more than owning a black-and-gold passport.

    Some say it’s the weather. Others cite family and friends. For many, quite unabashedly, it’s clearly the food.

    A UN survey on international migrant trends, released early last year, documented India’s diaspora population as being the largest in the world, with about 16 million Indians living outside the country in 2015. For many who left the motherland in pursuit of lucrative careers or world class education, life abroad proved to be a wonderful, multicultural experience. However, there are several who chose to return, united in their nostalgia for the subcontinent that never stopped being home.

    The Better India caught up with some ‘foreign-return’ NRIs on what they missed most about India, why they came home and what they’ve been upto since they arrived on desi soil.
    [​IMG]Santa Clara: Photo used for representation. Source: Wikimedia Commons

    ***

    It has been four years since Samta and her husband left Singapore for a life in India. The couple always knew they wanted to return. “We thought we’d stay for two years, but it ended up being six-and-a-half,” laughs Samta, citing her kids as the main reason behind the move. “We wanted them to grow up close to family and friends.”

    Sujata Gore, a Bombay girl who relocated to California as a newlywed, agrees. “My husband and I both grew up with big families and we wanted that for our son too. We moved back to India when he was two. It was a great decision and our son loved it. In the US it gets lonely, but we stay in a gated community here so there are always kids around for him to play with.”

    Dr. T R Raju, a Senior Professor at NIMHANS, left home at 22 and spent a little over a decade shuttling between Canberra, Boston and Sydney. In his case, concerns about his ailing parents were what drew him back home. When asked whether he returned to a vastly changed country, he replies simply, “One has to accept India for what it is.”

    Like him, former Santa Clara residents, Srinivas and Asha, who moved back to India with their daughters Gaana and Raaga after eight years in America say they never found struggles with identity to be an issue. “We have always been Indian, it’s not even a question for us,” they explain.

    But somewhere along the way, tupperware boxes filled with frozen parathas and the last spoonfuls of homemade pickle, carefully salvaged from the last trip back to India just didn’t cut it anymore.

    Srinivas declares, “India is my country. I love the culture here, I love the food here. I can live with Rs 20 or Rs 2,000 for a day, and there are hardships, but the family is here. That’s why we came back.”

    However, the move was fraught with some difficulties, particularly during the initial years. Asha recounts how her eldest had trouble becoming accustomed to the change of scene. “I was worried about the kids because Gaana took one year to get used to it,” she remembers. “To begin with, she was not very happy with it. She didn’t like it, it was different and hard initially, but she couldn’t stay back because she was too young.”

    What did help, fortunately, was the extensive research the couple invested in selecting the right school for their daughters to shift to.

    Asha explains that they chose it very carefully, and recommended it to other Indian friends who relocated to the city from California.
    [​IMG]
    Photo used for representational purposes only. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

    Despite the perks of being home — Sujata laughs about how spoiled she feels with access to maids and drivers, Samta gushes about the weather — in most cases there were some things that required a considerable adjustment period. Several found themselves returning to a changed homeland, remodeled to fit a “modern era”, albeit struggling to touch up the errant pothole or deliver unfailing wifi.

    “Nothing tragic, but I never drove in India before I left for the US, but coming back, even sitting in a car in the passenger seat – I used to get scared that someone would come and hit me because they were all so close,” Srinivas admits. “For eight years I could not get used to it.”

    “The traffic!” exclaims Sujata, articulating what seems to be a universal complaint.

    What is interesting to note, is that decisions to renounce their NRI status were often met with skepticism from peers. Samta describes how she and her husband were confronted with stories of maladapted families who regretted their move back to India when they first announced their plan to pack up. “We were told of people who came back to Singapore after leaving it because India didn’t suit them. But we haven’t regretted it. There are so many things you learn subconsciously. Singapore is very convenient and there’s so much about Asian life that’s similar there that it really doesn’t let you miss India. But it is a smaller country and when you live there you get only one perspective of life. Back here you get an entire spectrum.”

    It turns out that some of the biggest concerns that non-resident Indians have about returning are a dearth of medical facilities and a lack of knowledge about living situations in urban India. Many of these are complete myth, according to Samta.

    “A lot of expat Indians don’t know how great accommodation in India has become,” she says. “I feel that my house here in Bangalore is better than my home back in Singapore. It’s better planned, there’s more space and the landscaping is lovely. Urban India is also very cosmopolitan.”
    [​IMG]Photo used for representation only. Source: Wikimedia Commons

    What is amply clear in all these cases, is the fact that moving to India was a conscious choice.

    Suchindra Kanakanapalya describes this best when he says that India is “the story he wants to be associated with.” After university in Chicago and full time work in New York, the engineer quit his job to move to Chennai and marry his longtime girlfriend.
    [​IMG]Suchindra and family.

    The slump brought in by the 2008 recession and the vast distance between the US and India made him sure he was making the right decision. Before long, he found himself determined to understand “the real India,” and began questioning how a global education could be applied to the Indian context.

    Returning has also allowed him to engage with causes he believes in. He is a hardcore trekker, funds Go Sports, contributes to the Nature Conservation Foundation, champions the conservation of wildlife, organises discussion sessions on India’s position in a global environment and has even started the Bengaluru Trifits, an international group with members spanning nine countries and 20 cities, all of whom have lived in Bangalore at some point in their lives.

    “We have regular, international challenges,” he explains. “We’re always either doing a burpee challenge or a 30-day ab challenge. We indirectly also support causes all over the world. And of course, when those who live abroad visit India, we take them all over Bangalore.”

    Dr. Raju, too, has found that he and his wife have more time to pursue regular social work. They also enjoy travelling within India.

    “When people complain that nothing works in India I argue back,” Suchindra says. “It doesn’t help if you sit in your AC office, get into your AC car and then complain on Facebook. Get out there and do something! Meet with tribals, trek in forests, play chess at 2 in the morning with auto drivers in Pondicherry!”

    After assuring me he was quite serious about the latter, he continues, “If you engage with the real India you realise that it is full of people willing to work hard every day, to give up family time and come out and help each other. Neighbours drop in and share food here. In India it is somehow okay to expose your weakness and ask for help, because people really help you.”

    “It’s home sweet home,” affirms Dr. Raju.

    Sujata agrees, adding thoughtfully, “Somehow we just couldn’t imagine growing old anywhere else.”

    https://www.thebetterindia.com/84146/non-resident-indian-return-home/
     
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  12. SingaporeGuy

    SingaporeGuy FULL MEMBER

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    Besides the lower salary, i doubt india's growth in next 5 years will cause the exchange rate to be advantageous.

    Bad move.

    Besides that there are definitely more talents and prestigious to work with and contribute to overseas(not in india).

    If they do decide to move out, the lost time, opportunity cost, monies and time value of opportunity cost will make them cry.

    India also has trade deficits with many nations.

    One of the problem with trade deficit is a key to one of the problems with a growing economy - lack of robust industries to manufacture and create.

    Its an economy that is somewhat self sufficient, similar to NK.

    India will definitwly hit a roadblock.
     
  13. Laozi

    Laozi SENIOR MEMBER

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    Well if we go by history then the same India was once the centre of world trade. India had best education institutes and inventors and robust economy. In modern times also, many Indians are managing world largest companies. Lets see India grow under a non corrupt rule for a decade or two, then we can debate about it.
     
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  14. SingaporeGuy

    SingaporeGuy FULL MEMBER

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    India was larger half a century ago.

    I do not expected much from india.

    That proves our Point.

    Indians should not stay in india.
     
  15. Reichsmarschall

    Reichsmarschall ELITE MEMBER

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    India Is the Fastest-Growing Source of New Illegal Immigrants to the U.S.
    The country ranks fourth after Mexico, El Salvador and Guatemala for the largest source of unauthorized migrants to America


    By
    Karan Deep Singh
    Sep 22, 2016 2:29 pm IST
    9 COMMENTS

    Indians are one of the best-educated and best-paid groups of immigrants in the United States because the slice of the giant global desi diaspora which settles in the States tends to be populated by coders, doctors, engineers, executives and other high-skilled workers that arrive with work visas.

    MORE IN INDIA
    There is, however, a growing number of Indians that are less-skilled and staying in the country illegally. In fact, in recent years the net number of Indians staying in America illegally has been growing much more than even the number of new illegal Mexico-born immigrants in the country, a recent Pew Research Center report showed this week.

    Of course the total number of unauthorized Mexicans in the United States is more than ten times higher than the number of Indians but most of them arrived more than a decade ago. The total for illegal immigrants born in Mexico has been shrinking while the total from India has been growing more than any other country.

    In the period between 2009 and 2014, Pew estimates, the number of unauthorized Indian immigrants in the U.S. surged by 43% to a total of around 500,000. During the same period, the number of unauthorized Mexicans fell 8% to 5.85 million.





    India now ranks fourth after Mexico, El Salvador and Guatemala in terms of the countries that are the largest source of unauthorized migrants to America.

    Despite concerns of the U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump and his followers that a flood of illegal immigrants are hurting America, the number of illegals has actually been falling for years. However the steady decline of the number of illegal immigrants from Latin America has been partly offset by those arriving from Asia, led by India.

    “The U.S. unauthorized immigrant population – 11.1 million in 2014 – has stabilized since the end of the Great Recession, as the number from Mexico declined but the total from other regions of the world increased,” the report said.

    If you combine legal and illegal arrivals, both India and China are each sending more people to the United States in recent years. In 2014 about 136,000 people came to the U.S. from India, about 128,000 from China and about 123,000 from Mexico, census figures show. As recently as 2005, Mexico sent more than 10 times as many people to the U.S. as China, and more than six times as many as India.