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Why DG ISPR’s Tweet saves the Army?

Discussion in 'Seniors Cafe' started by fatman17, Apr 30, 2017.

  1. fatman17

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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    Why DG ISPR’s Tweet saves the Army?
    April 29, 2017
    DG ISPR tweet

    Syed Ali Jaffery|

    In a tweet, the Director General ISPR, Maj Gen Asif Ghafoor termed the notification on Dawn Leaks as “incomplete” and not in line with recommendations. The tweet conveyed the rejection of the notification in no uncertain terms. The tweet which was composed a while back has taken social media by the storm and points towards a visible tension between the civilian and military hierarchy. Interestingly, it comes on the heels of speculations about a so-called compromise between the PML-N and the army on the issue. Many are of the opinion that the actual culprits are protected while small contributors were scapegoated.

    Others opined that the military was soft on an attempt to breach national security. However, amid the fog of disinformation, the actual issue that underlies the importance of publishing Cyril Almeda’s story is being lost. Why is the actual leak important? Why was it tantamount to a threat to national security? The news story was neither a Cold Start thrust by India nor a terrorist attack by miscreants. The story was contrived in a way which could possibly invoke a physical offensive response by inimical forces.



    The crux of the story published was that the civilian leadership was distraught with the military’s lack of will to take on the menace of terrorism. More importantly, the story iterated that the military is harboring a network of terrorism which is causing ruckus and mayhem in Pakistan, as well as outside since it was suggested that it is a plank of our foreign policy.

    The story gave support to a narrative that is repeatedly dished out to the world by India, Afghanistan and the United States. It is used as a pretext to squeeze, browbeat and isolate Islamabad. To assert that the military fraternity exports terrorism in neighboring countries. In simple words, the feature in Pakistan’s premier is a repudiation of state’s narrative.

    All this makes this story a hot cake for the international audience. It acts as a credible and actionable lead for hostile forces when they so desire. Menacing to say the least, it is a precursor for offensive posturing by external powers who are always waiting for a trigger.

    More importantly, the content of the story was not only a vilification of a powerful institute of the country: Pakistan Armed Forces. It also showed that the state constituents were at loggerheads, a sign of real weakness. It was these serious ramifications that gave the Dawn leaks affair a critical status.



    The fissures between institutions will be a bane for Pakistan in more ways than one. Firstly, given the domestic issues that the government is facing, an institutional tiff is the last thing needed. With the legitimacy of the government being openly challenged, this rift will negatively impact issues of strategic importance.The brewing civil-military crisis will create a trust deficit, which in the process would hamper the already military-heavy Counter Terrorism drive. The political vocabulary will change significantly; instability, chaos and uncertainty will be ideal for anti-state actors to flourish.

    Meanwhile, as aforementioned international pressure would mount on Islamabad. The demand to act more will gain traction. The internal divide will adversely impact the country’s performance to tackle external challenges. A state derives its strength from its citizens and the establishment of workable institutions. The linkage between citizens and the state is created by trust of the former on the latter.

    Common citizens of Pakistan have a high degree of trust in its Armed forces. People laud the valor and the sacrifices rendered by the men in uniform; the forces are considered a bulwark against the enemies of the country.

    The recent speculations surrounding the army accepting the Dawn leaks whitewashed report was damaging for the military’s institutional credibility. Pakistani citizens are gritty and emotional when they realize that their security is threatened. Be it a conventional war imposed by India or a wave of terrorism, Pakistanis stand up in unison with their Armed forces, merely because of the belief that the brave sons of the soils will protect them. And many of them consider the Dawn saga as a security breach. Under such dynamics a perception of a backchannel deal over the leaks was a severe blow to the image of the army in particular. The tweet by the DG ISPR has enabled the army to regain or recover potential lost reputation as suspicions of compromise would have turned into widely-shared opinions and threatened the position the army holds in the Pakistani people’s hearts.



    Pitching the people against the Armed forces is sinister by all means. It is an old method in Warfare employed by enemies. At a time when the state of Pakistan is grappling with multifarious challenges from all quarters, any effort to harm the repute and standing of the military is an act which serves the enemies of the country. Hence one can safely say that the story published in Dawn was not mere pedantry.
     
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  2. fatman17

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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    The Actors
     
  3. fatman17

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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    The Military Players
     
  4. AUz

    AUz SENIOR MEMBER

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    Where's Maryam Nawaz picture?

    She's the prime culprit here and entire nation is looking if Army has enough credibility to go after the "royal queen" or not.

    Anything else is just farce
     
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  5. fatman17

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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    Actually the army gave her clean chit as a compromise even before the inquiry started.
     
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  6. AUz

    AUz SENIOR MEMBER

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    Exactly.

    Anything else is just a farce.

    Few tweets from ISPR means zilch. Quoting my earlier reply in another thread


    "As long as Army doesn't go after Maryam Nawaz and show that they are for real and have guts to put national security before their own political role in the country.

    Most likely (Army's demands) are gonna be some non-consequential things like oh don't just name the culprits but prosecute them too. Or something like 'Fawad Hassan Fawad is also part of report which wasn't mentioned and should be mentioned' etc

    Basically, just a charade of "conflict" so it seems that Army is standing upto Nawaz but it reality Army has bucked for its own personal gains as an institution and we all know it"
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
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  7. fatman17

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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  8. Levina

    Levina ELITE MEMBER

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    Dont mind me asking but why are Pak army and Pak politicians contradicting each other's statements ...perpetually?


    This is another one of the tweets made in reference to Panama leaks, where DGISPR has not taken Aitraz Ahsan's statement kindly.

    upload_2017-4-30_12-0-55.png
     
  9. fatman17

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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  10. fatman17

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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    We don't mind you asking at all.
     
  11. fatman17

    fatman17 PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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    What the Army Thinks

    by Ejaz Haider




    Pakistan’s civil-military divide as viewed through the mind of a military officer

    Since the publication of my piece Tweeting Differences, I have been engaged by several officers ranging from majors to lieutenant generals. Some I shared the article with, others read and responded.

    Full disclosure: I know most of them personally to varying degrees. Four of them are former 3-stars and held important command and staff appointments. All, regardless of rank, are thinking officers and reject the notion that Army should run the country.

    None asked me to put forward the Army’s viewpoint. My exchanges with them were private. But I consider it fair and proper, analytically and for reasons of journalistic probity, that I present their views and assess them, without attribution.

    What I write here will be a synopsis of the common strands that run through the views of different officers.

    There’s a reason for this exercise. The civil-military disequilibrium, or call it disconnect, is one of the most dangerous weaknesses of our polity. As a Pakistani who believes in strong, efficient and harmonious institutions, I consider it my—indeed our collective—responsibility to do whatever one (we) can to bridge this gap.

    From my point of view, three things are clear: One, the state is the overhang under which everyone must operate, whether in mufti or in khaki. Two, unlike some who think the military must be weakened, I believe that we need a strong military that is subordinate to civilian governments and in harmony with other elements of national power. Three, democracy, which gives to the citizens their right to be the principal authority, is not just about form but substance.

    The paradox and the challenge of civil-military relations and civilian supremacy has been best summed up by Peter D. Feaver: “…to reconcile a military strong enough to do anything the civilians ask them to do with a military subordinate enough to do only what the civilians authorize them to do.”

    Now to the synopsis:

    ***

    While the prime minister has constitutional privileges, it is not his privilege to deliberately malign a state institution, i.e., the Army. The Dawn story was purposely leaked to give the impression that Pakistan Army is a rogue organization.

    Shuja Nawaz recorded Nawaz Sharif’s style of governance in his book Crossed Swords: Pakistan, Its Army, and the Wars Within. Sharif continues on the same path, undermining institutions and rewarding personal loyalties instead of acting like the Chief Executive. His family and some close confidants have an undeclared but consistent policy of (a) driving a wedge between the people and the Army, (b) creating splits within the Army, and (c) giving an impression to the rest of the world that the problem is the Army and it needs to be sorted out.

    The Sharifs’ style of governance is evidenced by the Panama leaks and the Supreme Court verdict in the case based on those documents. Not even the majority judgment believes that his story hangs. Sharif has lost the moral right to govern. The Army has stayed out of multiple crises since 2008 and tried to reconcile political differences among warring political factions at their request, even as many called upon it to intervene and clean up the mess. The Army believes, firmly, that the country should be run by the elected representatives but it also expects that those representatives will govern properly, not undermine state institutions or the national interest. This, the officers insist, is also the view of the average citizen.

    On India, the officers’ viewpoint is again interesting. They believe that it is important to normalize relations but ask, not without reason, about the terms of such a dialogue or normalization. They also question the wisdom of the P.M.’s secret huddles with Indian tycoon Sajjan Jindal, whose adverse comments about the Pakistan Army are on record. They question the wisdom of a policy that bypasses an institutional approach to engagement with India at a time when Occupied Kashmir is burning. A few also point to the prime minister’s family’s alleged business links to Jindal, and the latter’s interest in transporting ore from Afghanistan to India via Pakistan.

    Finally, as many pointed out, General Qamar Bajwa is a straight soldier with a clear understanding of the many challenges Pakistan faces. If Sharif cannot even coordinate with him, then his problem with the Army runs too deep.

    ***

    The above synopsis offers insights into what the officer cadre, serving and retired, thinks about Sharif and his approach to governance. Even if, for the sake of the argument, we say this is more perception than reality, then, too, it should be clear that the chasm runs deep. Also clear from this should be the fact that with differences so deep, to expect policy coordination on the challenges that stare us in the face would require optimism at its most optimistic.

    One can present arguments detailing the civilian enclave’s frustration with the Army’s hold on certain core foreign policy issues and that would be fair commentary. But equally, on many issues, we have seen the civilians either abdicate and genuflect or create unnecessary friction, as happened in the case of the Dawn story.

    This is not a tenable situation unless addressed immediately. The prime minister should call a meeting of the Cabinet Committee on National Security and discuss these impressions, perceptions and differences with the military high command. If it is accepted that both sides want the best for Pakistan, then reaching out should not be difficult. In fact, that to me offers the best solution to discussing matters threadbare. It’s a no-brainer that if the intentions of a Chief Executive are doubted to this extent then we are looking at confrontation at worst and policy stalemate at best.

    Also, both sides, but especially the Army, should avoid falling in the trap of ‘forwarded as received’ WhatsApp messages. The business of state cannot be conducted through fora that are being used more for ‘alt-facts’ than facts as we traditionally know and define them.

    Haider is editor of national-security affairs at Capital TV. He was a Ford Scholar at the Program in Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C. He tweets @ejazhaider
     
  12. Tiger Awan

    Tiger Awan SENIOR MEMBER

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    giving her too much credit, IMO she cant think of any conspiracy. The attempt to malign army came from somewhere else
     
  13. AUz

    AUz SENIOR MEMBER

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    Lol, she's your next "leader"

    I'm sure she is very smart and has the best leadership qualities :lol:
     
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  14. Tiger Awan

    Tiger Awan SENIOR MEMBER

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    The amount of attention anti-Pmln ppl give her is surely putting her in centre of everything. She need not possess good leadership skills as long as her opponents keep her in news and keep her relevant
     
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  15. AUz

    AUz SENIOR MEMBER

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    Just to confirm: Your still supporting Shareef family's rule over our country despite the massive corruption and lies getting exposed in Panama leaks issue and failings of shareefs to satisfy the court proceedings.

    Right?
     
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