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Why are British Indians wielding more power than British Pakistanis?

Iltutmish

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Quite straightforward - they study hard, go to Universities and are productive unlike those who don't go to school, don't study, get radicalized and then blame 'yahoodis', racism, etc for their failed lives.
I did the same without becoming a self-hating, white-skin-worshipping Uncle Tom? The funny thing is, that you Hindus praise yourself with "The white man likes us more than you", how submissive and self-hating can you be? And in regards to blaming jews, you Hindus blame Muslims all the time that you can't have nice things due to us. I think every society has its bogeyman.

Muslims dare to be different, our religion makes us unique and prevents us to become submissive selfhating people. Our sole purpose in life is not to please white people!

But don't listen to me, listen to your white master:

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@Pan-Islamic-Pakistan @PAKISTANFOREVER
 

krash

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Always happy to educate -

Bailout
noun
an act of giving financial assistance to a failing business or economy to save it from collapse.

Has any Western nation / Institution given you money from imminent financial collapse? If yes, that's a bailout.
Please provide instances where financial assistance was given to Pakistan to avoid an imminent financial collapse.
 

Krptonite

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Please provide instances where financial assistance was given to Pakistan to avoid an imminent financial collapse.
Here's one

Although I would agree with the point you're trying to convey and I was able to find that article only since it contained the word "bailout", a misnomer in that instance, in my opinion.

Though GoP has gone through financial distress it was never to the brink of collapse as the word bailout would suggest. It has mostly used funds to fill the gaps occuring from market fluctuations.
 

Arulmozhi Varman

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I have always pointed it out to ghettoing. And that's the main reason why Muslims worldwide has issues with integrating with native communities.
I helped my Indian Muslim friend settle in Canada. The first home he decided to move in was a Muslim majority neighborhood. I can understand if the house was near to his workplace but that's the not the case either.

So how do people integrate and learn from the best to move forward in economic and social life? People hear doesn't want to hear this truth unfortunate. There are no new ideas flowing, no new gene interaction etc. However this observation is limited only to desi Muslims. The Arabs/Persians are highly integrated.
 

Iltutmish

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I have always pointed it out to ghettoing.
People want to live with other people to whom they have something in common? Shocking turn of events!!

And that's the main reason why Muslims worldwide has issues with integrating with native communities.
Integration is not a one-way-street.

I helped my Indian Muslim friend settle in Canada. The first home he decided to move in was a Muslim majority neighborhood. I can understand if the house was near to his workplace but that's the not the case either.
What's wrong with that?


The Arabs/Persians are highly integrated.
Arabs are not that integrated here in Germany and Persians think that they are basically White people and don't like other people from the Orient.
 

cloud4000

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Why are British Indians wielding more power than British Pakistanis?

KAMALA Harris’s acceptance of the vice presidential nomination is part of a trend — politicians with links to India are achieving positions of power in the West. Harris, who now has a far from implausible route to becoming the next but two US president, is half-Jamaican and half-Indian.

Harris’s mother, Shyamala Gopalan, arrived in Berkeley in 1958, nine years after Zulfikar Ali Bhutto studied there. But whereas ZAB returned (via Oxford) to win power at home, Gopalan married a Jamaican economics student and civil rights leader, Donald Harris. Her choice of partner was consistent with her family’s political traditions: back in India, Gopalan’s mother, Rajam, was an outspoken community organiser and husband, P.V. Gopalan, a progressive Indian diplomat involved in resettling some of those who fled the 1971 conflict in East Pakistan.

While Americans assess Harris, Brits are getting used to having three government ministers with an Indian heritage. As chancellor of the exchequer, Rishi Sunak, has won praise for his liberal distribution of cash to counter Covid-19. Dishy Rishi, as he has become known, is within the globalised elite, having studied at Oxford and Stanford before marrying the daughter of an Indian billionaire.

Another senior minister, hard right Home Secretary Priti Patel, went to less glamorous universities but she also completed postgraduate studies. Like Sunak, her family moved from India to East Africa before reaching the UK. The trio of Indian-origin heavy hitters is completed by Business Minister Alok Sharma who moved to the UK from Agra at the age of five.


By comparison, British Pakistanis have the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, and just one junior minister — Lord Tariq Ahmed in the Foreign Office.

Indian and Pakistani diplomats in London like it when they have a minister with links to their country in power. Conspiracy theories abound. They wonder whether it is a coincidence that Priti Patel’s new immigration policy favours applicants with PhDs in science and technology — something achieved by many more Indians than Pakistanis. The merging of the British Department for International Development into the Foreign Office could also have negative consequences for Pakistan. With the aid budget now controlled by diplomats, the UK is likely to demand more quid pro quos from Pakistan in return for funds.

But why are British Indians wielding more power than British Pakistanis? There are many explanations. British Indians such as Sunak and Patel, who reached the UK from East Africa enjoy two advantages: generally these families reached the UK not only relatively early but also with several generations worth of trading, education and worldliness behind them. Many Pakistanis by contrast came from undeveloped rural areas such as Mirpur where they picked up little experience of the outside world and even less education. While many British Indians now aspire to be accountants, many British Pakistanis have lower expectations, often ending up in relatively menial jobs; 15.4 per cent of British Indians are in higher managerial and professional occupations compared with 6.6pc of British Pakistanis.

Researchers in the UK are compiling increasing amounts of data about how different ethnic and religious groups are faring in the country and drawing tentative conclusions as to what is happening. It is now clear, for example, that Chinese and Indian pupils tend to make the most progress in primary school, with Indian pupils from lower socioeconomic backgrounds making the fastest progress. Pakistani and Bangladeshi young people do well between the ages of 11 and 16 but then their results taper off between the ages of 16 and 18. One study suggests that effect is especially marked in places where pupils are living in areas with a high concentration of their ethnic group.

It is hard to reach firm conclusions but it does seem clear that socioeconomic outcomes are shaped not just by ethnicity but also other factors. Some research looking at religion as well suggests that, all other things being equal, British Hindus fare better than British Muslims. It is striking that, within the British Indian community, Sikhs and Muslims remain almost twice as likely to be unemployed as Hindus. Having said that, Indian Muslims generally enjoy better outcomes than Pakistani Muslims, a finding which is consistent with research that suggests that factors such as gender are more important than someone’s faith.

Taken as a whole, the research suggests that for more people with Pakistani heritage to break through to positions of power in Western countries, there will need to be broader social changes affecting their community. No doubt Rishi, Patel, Sharma and Harris think they climbed to the top through their own efforts. To some extent they did, but they are also the product of socioeconomic trends beyond their control.

The writer is a British journalist. His book The Bhutto Dynasty will be published later this year.

Published in Dawn, September 1st, 2020
interesting article. I always thought that British-Pakistanis had the upper hand in UK compared to British-Indians, especially in terms of political influence.
 

Jackdaws

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Please provide instances where financial assistance was given to Pakistan to avoid an imminent financial collapse.

 

Jackdaws

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interesting article. I always thought that British-Pakistanis had the upper hand in UK compared to British-Indians, especially in terms of political influence.
So did I. From what I understand the Pakistanis almost wholesale support Labour whereas Indians while having a tilt to Labour, also support Conservatives. Again, my knowledge of British politics is limited so I could be mistaken.
 

Azadkashmir

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Is that why half of them are sat in "Whiteland"? And the other half dreaming of running to land of white milk?
it was ayub khans time when they flooded Azad Kashmir no compensation but only passport to go abroad. So don't put that on us.
Pakistan benefited from that dam. People still remember. Still, Brit paks send money over to develop Azad Kashmir, no, thanks and help from both government.
 

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