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Who Pakistan picks as army chief matters far beyond its borders

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https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-...ef-matters-far-beyond-its-borders-2022-11-17/

Explainer: Who Pakistan picks as army chief matters far beyond its borders​

By Gibran Naiyyar Peshimam
Pakistan's Army Chief of Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa arrives to attend the Pakistan Day military parade in Islamabad

Pakistan's Army Chief of Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa arrives to attend the Pakistan Day military parade in Islamabad, Pakistan, March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood/Files
KARACHI, Pakistan, Nov 17 (Reuters) - Pakistan's nuclear armed military is set to get a new supremo later this month when General Qamar Javed Bajwa's tenure as Chief of Army Staff comes to an end.
The military is the most powerful institution in a nation seldom far from its next crisis and the appointment could have a crucial bearing on the future of Pakistan's fragile democracy, and whether relations with neighbouring India are allowed to improve.
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During the 75 years since independence and formation of Pakistan out of the Partition of India, the army has seized power three times and directly ruled the Islamic republic for more than three decades, fighting three wars with India along the way.

Even when a civilian government holds power, Pakistan's generals retain a dominant influence over security matters and foreign affairs. And the new chief could set the tone for the conduct of relations with the Hindu nationalist government in India, the Taliban in Afghanistan, and determine whether Pakistan tilts more toward China or the United States.

BAJWA'S LEGACY​

Appointed chief in 2016, Bajwa sought to balance ties with China and the United States. While Islamabad moved closer to Beijing, Bajwa also worked to thaw relations with Washington, with whom he worked closely during the evacuation of Kabul in 2021 when western forces pulled out of Afghanistan.

Latest Updates​

Bajwa also took an active interest in economic matters, as well he might given how much of the budget goes to the military.
He made highly-publicised visits to Beijing and the Middle East - helping to secure financial assistance for Pakistan. He also lobbied Washington to help strike a deal with the International Monetary Fund.
He even summoned Pakistan's top industrialists to a meeting at army headquarters to encourage them to pay more tax.
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During his tenure, India and Pakistan fought air skirmishes in 2019, but he was a public proponent of better ties and avoided escalation when tensions ran high, such as when an Indian missile accidentally crashed into Pakistan's territory this year.
In early 2021, Bajwa sanctioned a restoration of a ceasefire agreement with Delhi in the disputed region of Kashmir.
Domestically, he was accused of political meddling. Politicians said he helped former cricketer Imran Khan become prime minister in 2018. In an about-turn earlier this year, Khan accused Bajwa of playing a part in his downfall.

HOW IS A CHIEF APPOINTED?​

The outgoing chief will give the prime minister a list of senior-most generals to choose from. Only on rare occasions has the baton been passed to someone outside the top four most senior officers in an army that, with just under a million personnel in 2019, was the sixth largest in the world.
An army chief's tenure is for three years, but they often obtain extensions, as did Bajwa. Despite assurances by the military that Bajwa will retire this time, there has been speculation that he could be given another extension due to the latest political and economic ructions in Pakistan.
The generals regarded as front-runners to replace Bajwa are Lieutenant-Generals Asim Munir, the army's quartermaster general and a former spy chief, Sahir Shamshad, commander of the Rawalpindi Corps, Azhar Abbas, the army's chief of general staff, and Nauman Mahmood, chief of the National Defence University.

WHY IT MATTERS GLOBALLY​

Pakistan's army chief will play a key role in managing risks of conflict with nuclear-armed rival India on its eastern border, while dealing with potential instability and friction with Afghanistan on its western frontier.
Many world capitals, including Washington and Beijing, have direct ties with Pakistan's military, given the country's strategic location in a volatile neighbourhood, and a coastline close to major shipping lanes serving the oil-rich Gulf.
Foreign governments have periodically questioned the safety of a nuclear arsenal, that includes long-range missiles, in a country so frequently needing IMF bail outs and where anti-Western and anti-India militant groups have proliferated.
And internal security has been a near constant problem due to insurgencies in ethnic Pashtun and Baloch regions.
Despite all the risks, Pakistan and its military have dismissed foreigners' concerns over the command and control, and security of its nuclear weapons.

WHY IS THIS APPOINTMENT IMPORTANT DOMESTICALLY?​

The military has long been accused of manipulating the democratic process to maintain its dominance. Nineteen of Pakistan's 30 prime ministers were elected, but not one of them completed their five year terms.
Having recently admitted to its past meddling in politics, the army has said it would no longer interfere. Whether the new chief stands by that commitment could be key to Pakistan's democratic evolution.
Pakistan is in the midst of another bout of political uncertainty as Khan has led country-wide protests in an attempt to force Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif into early elections.
The incoming army chief could potentially play a key role in lowering the political temperature as Pakistan attempts to survive an economic crisis and recover from historic floods.
 

omegared

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https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-...ef-matters-far-beyond-its-borders-2022-11-17/

Explainer: Who Pakistan picks as army chief matters far beyond its borders​

By Gibran Naiyyar Peshimam
Pakistan's Army Chief of Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa arrives to attend the Pakistan Day military parade in Islamabad's Army Chief of Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa arrives to attend the Pakistan Day military parade in Islamabad

Pakistan's Army Chief of Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa arrives to attend the Pakistan Day military parade in Islamabad, Pakistan, March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood/Files
KARACHI, Pakistan, Nov 17 (Reuters) - Pakistan's nuclear armed military is set to get a new supremo later this month when General Qamar Javed Bajwa's tenure as Chief of Army Staff comes to an end.
The military is the most powerful institution in a nation seldom far from its next crisis and the appointment could have a crucial bearing on the future of Pakistan's fragile democracy, and whether relations with neighbouring India are allowed to improve.
Advertisement · Scroll to continue
Report an ad
During the 75 years since independence and formation of Pakistan out of the Partition of India, the army has seized power three times and directly ruled the Islamic republic for more than three decades, fighting three wars with India along the way.

Even when a civilian government holds power, Pakistan's generals retain a dominant influence over security matters and foreign affairs. And the new chief could set the tone for the conduct of relations with the Hindu nationalist government in India, the Taliban in Afghanistan, and determine whether Pakistan tilts more toward China or the United States.

BAJWA'S LEGACY​

Appointed chief in 2016, Bajwa sought to balance ties with China and the United States. While Islamabad moved closer to Beijing, Bajwa also worked to thaw relations with Washington, with whom he worked closely during the evacuation of Kabul in 2021 when western forces pulled out of Afghanistan.

Latest Updates​

Bajwa also took an active interest in economic matters, as well he might given how much of the budget goes to the military.
He made highly-publicised visits to Beijing and the Middle East - helping to secure financial assistance for Pakistan. He also lobbied Washington to help strike a deal with the International Monetary Fund.
He even summoned Pakistan's top industrialists to a meeting at army headquarters to encourage them to pay more tax.
Advertisement · Scroll to continue
Report an ad
During his tenure, India and Pakistan fought air skirmishes in 2019, but he was a public proponent of better ties and avoided escalation when tensions ran high, such as when an Indian missile accidentally crashed into Pakistan's territory this year.
In early 2021, Bajwa sanctioned a restoration of a ceasefire agreement with Delhi in the disputed region of Kashmir.
Domestically, he was accused of political meddling. Politicians said he helped former cricketer Imran Khan become prime minister in 2018. In an about-turn earlier this year, Khan accused Bajwa of playing a part in his downfall.

HOW IS A CHIEF APPOINTED?​

The outgoing chief will give the prime minister a list of senior-most generals to choose from. Only on rare occasions has the baton been passed to someone outside the top four most senior officers in an army that, with just under a million personnel in 2019, was the sixth largest in the world.
An army chief's tenure is for three years, but they often obtain extensions, as did Bajwa. Despite assurances by the military that Bajwa will retire this time, there has been speculation that he could be given another extension due to the latest political and economic ructions in Pakistan.
The generals regarded as front-runners to replace Bajwa are Lieutenant-Generals Asim Munir, the army's quartermaster general and a former spy chief, Sahir Shamshad, commander of the Rawalpindi Corps, Azhar Abbas, the army's chief of general staff, and Nauman Mahmood, chief of the National Defence University.

WHY IT MATTERS GLOBALLY​

Pakistan's army chief will play a key role in managing risks of conflict with nuclear-armed rival India on its eastern border, while dealing with potential instability and friction with Afghanistan on its western frontier.
Many world capitals, including Washington and Beijing, have direct ties with Pakistan's military, given the country's strategic location in a volatile neighbourhood, and a coastline close to major shipping lanes serving the oil-rich Gulf.
Foreign governments have periodically questioned the safety of a nuclear arsenal, that includes long-range missiles, in a country so frequently needing IMF bail outs and where anti-Western and anti-India militant groups have proliferated.
And internal security has been a near constant problem due to insurgencies in ethnic Pashtun and Baloch regions.
Despite all the risks, Pakistan and its military have dismissed foreigners' concerns over the command and control, and security of its nuclear weapons.

WHY IS THIS APPOINTMENT IMPORTANT DOMESTICALLY?​

The military has long been accused of manipulating the democratic process to maintain its dominance. Nineteen of Pakistan's 30 prime ministers were elected, but not one of them completed their five year terms.
Having recently admitted to its past meddling in politics, the army has said it would no longer interfere. Whether the new chief stands by that commitment could be key to Pakistan's democratic evolution.
Pakistan is in the midst of another bout of political uncertainty as Khan has led country-wide protests in an attempt to force Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif into early elections.
The incoming army chief could potentially play a key role in lowering the political temperature as Pakistan attempts to survive an economic crisis and recover from historic floods.
To summarise the above article:

1. He is accepted as the behind the scenes main player in Pakistan.
2. He Thawed relationship with USA ( By kicking out Khan? ).
3. He apparently got us out the grey list ( By kicking out Khan?)
4. Bajwa sanctioned a restoration of a ceasefire agreement with Delhi in Kashmir.
5. Army says it wont get involve in politics again.
6. Bajwa decided how much of the budget goes to the military.
 

alibaz

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It should be based on seniority as on 29 Nov 22. No more extensions for anyone, irrespective of any situation . This army has very correct DNA which recovers in no time. It lost over a dozen starred officers including its COAS and CJCSC in a single incident but there was absolutely no issue. Next in line were ready to takeover responsibilities.
 

mudas777

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https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-...ef-matters-far-beyond-its-borders-2022-11-17/

Explainer: Who Pakistan picks as army chief matters far beyond its borders​

By Gibran Naiyyar Peshimam
Pakistan's Army Chief of Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa arrives to attend the Pakistan Day military parade in Islamabad's Army Chief of Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa arrives to attend the Pakistan Day military parade in Islamabad

Pakistan's Army Chief of Staff General Qamar Javed Bajwa arrives to attend the Pakistan Day military parade in Islamabad, Pakistan, March 23, 2017. REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood/Files
KARACHI, Pakistan, Nov 17 (Reuters) - Pakistan's nuclear armed military is set to get a new supremo later this month when General Qamar Javed Bajwa's tenure as Chief of Army Staff comes to an end.
The military is the most powerful institution in a nation seldom far from its next crisis and the appointment could have a crucial bearing on the future of Pakistan's fragile democracy, and whether relations with neighbouring India are allowed to improve.
Advertisement · Scroll to continue
Report an ad
During the 75 years since independence and formation of Pakistan out of the Partition of India, the army has seized power three times and directly ruled the Islamic republic for more than three decades, fighting three wars with India along the way.

Even when a civilian government holds power, Pakistan's generals retain a dominant influence over security matters and foreign affairs. And the new chief could set the tone for the conduct of relations with the Hindu nationalist government in India, the Taliban in Afghanistan, and determine whether Pakistan tilts more toward China or the United States.

BAJWA'S LEGACY​

Appointed chief in 2016, Bajwa sought to balance ties with China and the United States. While Islamabad moved closer to Beijing, Bajwa also worked to thaw relations with Washington, with whom he worked closely during the evacuation of Kabul in 2021 when western forces pulled out of Afghanistan.

Latest Updates​

Bajwa also took an active interest in economic matters, as well he might given how much of the budget goes to the military.
He made highly-publicised visits to Beijing and the Middle East - helping to secure financial assistance for Pakistan. He also lobbied Washington to help strike a deal with the International Monetary Fund.
He even summoned Pakistan's top industrialists to a meeting at army headquarters to encourage them to pay more tax.
Advertisement · Scroll to continue
Report an ad
During his tenure, India and Pakistan fought air skirmishes in 2019, but he was a public proponent of better ties and avoided escalation when tensions ran high, such as when an Indian missile accidentally crashed into Pakistan's territory this year.
In early 2021, Bajwa sanctioned a restoration of a ceasefire agreement with Delhi in the disputed region of Kashmir.
Domestically, he was accused of political meddling. Politicians said he helped former cricketer Imran Khan become prime minister in 2018. In an about-turn earlier this year, Khan accused Bajwa of playing a part in his downfall.

HOW IS A CHIEF APPOINTED?​

The outgoing chief will give the prime minister a list of senior-most generals to choose from. Only on rare occasions has the baton been passed to someone outside the top four most senior officers in an army that, with just under a million personnel in 2019, was the sixth largest in the world.
An army chief's tenure is for three years, but they often obtain extensions, as did Bajwa. Despite assurances by the military that Bajwa will retire this time, there has been speculation that he could be given another extension due to the latest political and economic ructions in Pakistan.
The generals regarded as front-runners to replace Bajwa are Lieutenant-Generals Asim Munir, the army's quartermaster general and a former spy chief, Sahir Shamshad, commander of the Rawalpindi Corps, Azhar Abbas, the army's chief of general staff, and Nauman Mahmood, chief of the National Defence University.

WHY IT MATTERS GLOBALLY​

Pakistan's army chief will play a key role in managing risks of conflict with nuclear-armed rival India on its eastern border, while dealing with potential instability and friction with Afghanistan on its western frontier.
Many world capitals, including Washington and Beijing, have direct ties with Pakistan's military, given the country's strategic location in a volatile neighbourhood, and a coastline close to major shipping lanes serving the oil-rich Gulf.
Foreign governments have periodically questioned the safety of a nuclear arsenal, that includes long-range missiles, in a country so frequently needing IMF bail outs and where anti-Western and anti-India militant groups have proliferated.
And internal security has been a near constant problem due to insurgencies in ethnic Pashtun and Baloch regions.
Despite all the risks, Pakistan and its military have dismissed foreigners' concerns over the command and control, and security of its nuclear weapons.

WHY IS THIS APPOINTMENT IMPORTANT DOMESTICALLY?​

The military has long been accused of manipulating the democratic process to maintain its dominance. Nineteen of Pakistan's 30 prime ministers were elected, but not one of them completed their five year terms.
Having recently admitted to its past meddling in politics, the army has said it would no longer interfere. Whether the new chief stands by that commitment could be key to Pakistan's democratic evolution.
Pakistan is in the midst of another bout of political uncertainty as Khan has led country-wide protests in an attempt to force Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif into early elections.
The incoming army chief could potentially play a key role in lowering the political temperature as Pakistan attempts to survive an economic crisis and recover from historic floods.
No where in the world army is above the law of the land and there are civilian authorities which run the country. While in the Pakistan instead of following the laws, army is holding the gun to the country institutions and they think they are the law. No wonder country failed to develop in any sphere of life and yet they still think they are the smart arses and need to be loved and respected, my foot.
 

Bleek

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Hopefully the conspiracies against Army will come to a halt soon.
It's simple.

Give the people tangible and visible results and the support will return. If you look at Pakistan's wider society, no one truly cares about their involvement in politics, it has largely been known. The real issue is there complete incompetency in governance even when being involved. China rules openly with an authoritarian system but majority are on board because of tangible results.

Crack down on terrorism by equipping soldiers effectively, hunt down terrorist sympathisers sitting in urban cities on Twitter, the LGBT filth parades, put in place effective economic policies for long-lasting reforms. All this can only be done properly if they use strict meritocracy, not through nepotism or putting incompetent sarkaris to work in civillian institutions who have zero clue on how to achieve desired results.

There's simply no sign of leadership from those in charge and they've thrown the whole of Pakistan into chaos!

They're embarrassing the nation with these Sharifs and trangender looking Bhuttos. Where Imran Khan looked to address things, they're ignoring it.

Everything will be back to normal if they do this, they can also bring back Imran Khan and give him more room to maneuver.
 
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Signalian

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It's simple.

Give the people tangible and visible results and the support will return. If you look at Pakistan's wider society, no one truly cares about their involvement in politics, it has largely been known. The real issue is there complete incompetency in governance even when being involved. China rules openly with an authoritarian system but majority are on board because of tangible results.

Crack down on terrorism by equipping soldiers effectively, hunt down terrorist sympathisers sitting in urban cities on Twitter, the LGBT filth parades, put in place effective economic policies for long-lasting reforms. All this can only be done properly if they use strict meritocracy, not through nepotism or putting incompetent sarkaris to work in civillian institutions who have zero clue on how to achieve desired results.

There's simply no sign of leadership from those in charge and they've thrown the whole of Pakistan into chaos!

They're embarrassing the nation with these Sharifs and trangender looking Bhuttos. Where Imran Khan looked to address things, they're ignoring it.

Everything will be back to normal if they do this, they can also bring back Imran Khan and give him more room to maneuver.
This is what Government and Police (other LEAs) need to do, not military.
 

Bleek

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This is what Government and Police (other LEAs) need to do, not military.
Who are you kidding mate, it's an open secret that the military has it's hand in practically every institution in Pakistan and they have no plan of removing it.

Since they don't want to remove it, they should at least provide competent governance in each sector. But instead it's filled with nepotism, corruption and incapable, incompetent, and short-sighted men who are simply unable to deal with a complex state like Pakistan.

It's a ticking time bomb and only a short while left till it all collapses. If it is to survive is purely through competent governance which can only be achieved through meritocracy.
 

Riz

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Who are you kidding mate, it's an open secret that the military has it's hand in practically every institution in Pakistan and they have no plan of removing it.

Since they don't want to remove it, they should at least provide competent governance in each sector. But instead it's filled with nepotism, corruption and incapable, incompetent, and short-sighted men who are simply unable to deal with a complex state like Pakistan.

It's a ticking time bomb and only a short while left till it all collapses. If it is to survive is purely through competent governance which can only be achieved through meritocracy.
Maaf karna yeh sahib boot chaat kar kaheen idhar udhar nikal jaty hain 😀 he think everyone is boot licker like him
 

Signalian

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Who are you kidding mate, it's an open secret that the military has it's hand in practically every institution in Pakistan and they have no plan of removing it.

Since they don't want to remove it, they should at least provide competent governance in each sector. But instead it's filled with nepotism, corruption and incapable, incompetent, and short-sighted men who are simply unable to deal with a complex state like Pakistan.

It's a ticking time bomb and only a short while left till it all collapses. If it is to survive is purely through competent governance which can only be achieved through meritocracy.
The bureaucracy in Pakistan exists for a reason and has a responsibility which its paid to do. Pointing everything towards military is just a lame excuse to make a logical sense of unable to handle any situation.
 

Bleek

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The bureaucracy in Pakistan exists for a reason and has a responsibility which its paid to do. Pointing everything towards military is just a lame excuse to make a logical sense of unable to handle any situation.
Sounds good on paper but we both know that's not reality so let's skip the role-playing

The bureaucy is for show and tell, we know who runs things, and has been all along. Mr Bajwai admitted it.

If you care about Pakistan, even if you are pro-military intervention, you should accept that they are incompetent in what they do and it's largely due to neglecting meritocracy through excessive nepotism and corruption.

Maaf karna yeh sahib boot chaat kar kaheen idhar udhar nikal jaty hain 😀 he think everyone is boot licker like him
Inka kya kare bhai? Mulk bankrupt hone wala hai aur ye yaha bet ke asliat ko deny kara hai, jisne Bajwa bhi admit kiya tha 😂
 

Signalian

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Sounds good on paper but we both know that's not reality so let's skip the role-playing

The bureaucy is for show and tell, we know who runs things, and has been all along. Mr Bajwai admitted it.

If you care about Pakistan, even if you are pro-military intervention, you should accept that they are incompetent in what they do and it's largely due to neglecting meritocracy through excessive nepotism and corruption.


Inka kya kare bhai? Mulk bankrupt hone wala hai aur ye yaha bet ke asliat ko deny kara hai, jisne Bajwa bhi admit kiya tha 😂
Intervention can occur on some level, not on all levels since that would require posting of military officers in all those departments. Bajwa admitted interference and that was bringing PTI into power, but he also mentioned no intervention after early months of 2022. So twisting things here to prove a theory is not going to help.
 

Olympus81

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The establishment role in politics is clear as daylight.

Post February, their role in politics has actually increased. The FIRs on journalists, arresting politicians, the tortures, the X videos, meeting Shahbaz, meeting with IK behind closed doors etc.

I’d like to believe Bajwa, but lets not kid ourselves. His credibility is 0.

Let’s hope the new Chief introspects and right the things that are wrong with this institution.
 
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