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What caused overpopulation in Pakistan?

ThunderCat

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Another myth is Balochistan is desert with sand, nothing can be grown on sand.

Balochistan is an arid, mountaneous in many areas, but with fertile Soil/Mitti where all kind of crops can be grown when water is available. It is not sand in many areas but soil without water resources. And mountain areas has valleys and meadows. There are large plains also.

Fruit trees gets the moisture and water from the ground, ground water and from atmosphere unlike crops which need to be watered, so Balochistan has abundance of fruit gardens, has many climatic zones and with distinct winters and summers.


Balochistan is suitable for growing all kinds of crops including Wheat, rice, cotton, pulses, oilseed crops, and kinds of fruits including grapes, cherry and almonds, peach, pomegranate, apricot, apple, and dates.

Only a percentage of the land of Balochistan can produce apples- which itself is not a component for population. Most of Balochistan is infertile.

It has no major rivers nor does it receive sufficient rainfalls, so it has poor vegetation and hence a small population like every other land in the world where the climatic conditions make vegetation difficult.

Some Europeans countries managed to artificially grow tropical food in their Northern climates thanks to the Haber-Bosch process.
 

PradoTLC

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Lack of television in early days , resulted in population. Growth across south asia .

Y

Yes nirodh, hehe
They are not good .

yes..

indian condom due to poor quality tend to burst pre maturely


 

ghazi52

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.,,..,

Why can’t Pakistan tackle its rapid population growth?


Zeba Sathar
November 26, 2022

THIS year the world’s population reached eight billion and Pakistan’s 230m. The world paused to absorb a major milestone in humanity, an unprecedented and exponential increase largely due to longer survival of the species, major scientific strides, and momentous events in human history. In Pakistan, we barely paused to reflect on what it means to have grown from 33m at Independence to 230m in 75 years.

We have slowly edged towards becoming the fifth largest country in the world. If our economy were thriving and natural resources infinite, then we might be justified in our lack of concern at the rapid population growth in Pakistan.

Given that the multiple crises facing the country are almost all directly related to unabated population growth, why are we so unconcerned about the 230m Pakistanis today and the additional 110m we expect to add by 2050? What does Pakistan have to offer to our current and future generations and why can we not tackle our rapid population growth? We must ask the difficult questions.

Pakistan needs to finally wake up to the apocalypse: 1.4m unwanted births and 2.2m abortions and miscarriages each year that could be avoided through family planning.

Voluntary family planning gives families choices. When we deny these choices, it is because of our callous attitude. After all, these are women and children whose lives will hardly intersect with ours, let alone match the standards we expect for ourselves.

We celebrate the growth rate that has declined this year to 1.9 per cent, but this is a meagre decimal point decline achieved over several years. Above all, our growth rate is double that of Bangladesh, Malawi, Kenya, India, and Iran — all of which stridently pursue national agendas that aspire to rise from poverty, to provide jobs to the youth and to ensure universal health coverage and universal primary education. These are all basic civil rights from which we are deviating wilfully.

Why can we not tackle our rapid population growth?

week, more than 3,000 attended the gala international conference on family planning in Pattaya, Thailand, to celebrate women and girls and the power of family planning to not just save but also to empower lives.

What was striking was the fragmented Pakistani delegation of a handful of government officials and hundreds of NGO and independent members, mainly rallied around their own limited and rather unremarkable successes. It was an occasion to laud delegations from African countries with much lower GDPs — countries like Malawi, Rwanda, Senegal — that were there to seriously attend sessions and note innovations in order to improve their family planning programmes and reach for greater success.

Admittedly, the Pakistan delegates had a tough task — to concede that there has hardly been any change in our fertility and family planning indicators since 2007, that this is not just worrying but alarming — and we should have been there to learn how the rest of the world was reaping huge benefits from family planning.

The FP exemplar session, which showed countries that had achieved huge success since 2010, presented Pakistan at the bottom of all possible metrics of performance in family planning.

I realised the community that is entrusted with leadership in family planning needs to bring in the political leadership more, but it also needs to set its house in order and unite on how our family planning efforts could be redoubled to catch up with low-income counterparts.

Nepal, Kenya, Sierra Leone, and Laos are exemplar countries that had much less going in their favour 10 years ago, but just determinedly went about empowering communities, men, women and families to have fewer better-spaced children in order to give them a better future. We need, above all, to unite rather than work in silos, to plan and agree unequivocally on the next steps we will take to change the flatline that is our contraceptive prevalence rate.

At no point in our history were we as culpable for injustice as during the recent floods when 33m people from the poorest districts of Pakistan were swept out of their homes to live as animals.

Women and children suffered the most. And the biggest tragedy was that the scale of the disaster could have been vastly reduced if these underserved, climate-vulnerable districts had received family planning, maternal and childcare services. But the victims lived in neglected areas and faced a tragedy foretold.

The population angle was not brought up at the COP27 conference, and is likely to elude our evolving damages-and-losses approach to climate change. Family planning and balancing population and resources must be ensured as part of our climate rehabilitation and rebuilding strategy.

Miftah Ismail’s recent piece on governance challenges states that the population problem is straightforward, easy to solve; family planning does not require much money, just resolve and competence.

The message for our current and future federal and provincial governments, NGOs and development partners is simple and clear:

1) Do not mystify and complicate a looming high population growth rate accompanied by millions of unwanted pregnancies and babies each year, just to abrogate responsibility;
2) No new policies please, we have enough of those;
3) Start now, plan ambitiously, implement quickly with good technical advice to expand family planning services within the health sector, both static and community-based;
4) No coercion is required for family planning adoption, just common intuition and a general rendering of reproductive justice — by providing information and services for voluntary family planning to couples and women to enable them to have a better balance between children and ensure their full rights;
5) Add innovations and strategies to break the impasse on population indicators, but based on evidence of their effectiveness, potential impact and costs.

Eight billion is a landmark for the world’s population. Let it also be a landmark for Pakistan’s history, as the year we decided we would switch from producing droves of Pakistanis searching for jobs the world over, to a strong nation of educated, healthy and vibrant citizens.

Only then will Pakistan stand up and be counted other than as the wretched disaster of too many with too little to offer humanity.

The writer is Country Director, Population Council.

Published in Dawn, November 26th, 2022
 

ThunderCat

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A Case for Limiting Total Food Production for Human Consumption: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/case...amEAP-EmOWEHghori-tyyYZXq1jS67gHRqhaep4ZoTijk

Few experts in population biology, related fields of science, demography and economics appear ready and willing to see what is in front of naked eyes. Too many experts have confused cause and effect and thereby vitiated the coherence of mind and clarity of vision required to sensibly interpret evidence of whatsoever could be objectively correlated with reality. As a consequence, they appear to find the ecological science of human population dynamics simultaneously unbelievable yet virtually irrefutable.

We do not have a food production problem. Food harvests are abundant; food is sufficient to feed the human community plus many more. The problem is food redistribution. Granted the fair and equitable redistribution of available food to the human community writ large would lead in all likelihood to a temporary, exacerbating increase in absolute global human population numbers; however, limiting total global food production that humans consume would in the course of space-time return Homo sapiens to balance within the natural world.

Consider biomimicry, the design and production of materials, structures, and systems that are modeled on biological entities and processes. For a moment let us assume that nature has the answers to the problems human beings have induced by relentlessly increasing the human food supply, and must now confront and overcome. By following the laws of the natural world, by changing our way to conform with nature, humans would consciously and deliberately mimic nature's way where we find that all resources (including food to feed a growing population) are categorically limited by the size and finite resources of the planet which is our planetary home, the house humans have filled beyond its natural carrying capacity through the massive deployment of complex systems and inventive technologies.

One of the worst mistakes of the second half of the 20th Century has been and continues to be generated by the United Nations. A delusion in the form of a meme, or unquestioned cultural transmission, has been viewed as real and spread virally by misusing the imprimatur of science upon which the meme is not actually based. Large scale human organizations have held tightly to versions of the same meme prior to this time period. Most experts became captives of a satisfying false cultural transmission: humans must continuously increase food production to feed a growing population. This misperception/misconception of reality cloaks our view of the way the world really works with regard to the population dynamics of all species within the evolutionary 'tree of life', including Homo sapiens.

There are hallmarks that define a deluded cultural transmission. They include political convenience, economic expediency, social suitability, religious tolerance, and legalization. All seem necessary for a false meme to become culturally prescribed. Purveyors of false memes willfully ignore the questioning of ideas upon which their misinformation is based --- a hallmark of science. Without the support of science we find ourselves in a festering haze of delusion.

With regard to its population dynamics, our evolving memetic species has a vital task. Substitute a scientifically founded meme for the unquestioned false one. Then the new meme would be: increases in the total production of food for human consumption lead to a global population increase of H. sapiens. We would acknowledge not only that we have a food distribution problem but also a problem derived from our tragic failure to use available ways and means to prevent unwanted births humanely.

How the human community chooses to act in response to this daunting predicament is something others more capable than I will have to address and find a way to overcome. Years ago, before the 21st century began to unfold, my spouse advised me not to communicate the ecological science of human population dynamics until I had a solution to the existential situation disclosed by the evidence. I told her then and say to all now, I do not have answers to the thorny questions or solutions to difficult problems the heretofore uncontested science raises. Please allow me to add the belief that any program of action to rein in the size of the human population by limiting the human food supply must begin by taking simultaneous steps to feed the human community as well as to save the flourishing of life (i.e., biodiversity) as we know it.

It is neither necessary nor sustainable to continue increasing food production to feed a growing human population. To the contrary, such a determination ultimately carries with it profoundly harmful consequences. In the case of H. sapiens the species eats itself out of house and home.
 

One_Nation

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A Case for Limiting Total Food Production for Human Consumption: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/case...amEAP-EmOWEHghori-tyyYZXq1jS67gHRqhaep4ZoTijk

Few experts in population biology, related fields of science, demography and economics appear ready and willing to see what is in front of naked eyes. Too many experts have confused cause and effect and thereby vitiated the coherence of mind and clarity of vision required to sensibly interpret evidence of whatsoever could be objectively correlated with reality. As a consequence, they appear to find the ecological science of human population dynamics simultaneously unbelievable yet virtually irrefutable.

We do not have a food production problem. Food harvests are abundant; food is sufficient to feed the human community plus many more. The problem is food redistribution. Granted the fair and equitable redistribution of available food to the human community writ large would lead in all likelihood to a temporary, exacerbating increase in absolute global human population numbers; however, limiting total global food production that humans consume would in the course of space-time return Homo sapiens to balance within the natural world.

Consider biomimicry, the design and production of materials, structures, and systems that are modeled on biological entities and processes. For a moment let us assume that nature has the answers to the problems human beings have induced by relentlessly increasing the human food supply, and must now confront and overcome. By following the laws of the natural world, by changing our way to conform with nature, humans would consciously and deliberately mimic nature's way where we find that all resources (including food to feed a growing population) are categorically limited by the size and finite resources of the planet which is our planetary home, the house humans have filled beyond its natural carrying capacity through the massive deployment of complex systems and inventive technologies.

One of the worst mistakes of the second half of the 20th Century has been and continues to be generated by the United Nations. A delusion in the form of a meme, or unquestioned cultural transmission, has been viewed as real and spread virally by misusing the imprimatur of science upon which the meme is not actually based. Large scale human organizations have held tightly to versions of the same meme prior to this time period. Most experts became captives of a satisfying false cultural transmission: humans must continuously increase food production to feed a growing population. This misperception/misconception of reality cloaks our view of the way the world really works with regard to the population dynamics of all species within the evolutionary 'tree of life', including Homo sapiens.

There are hallmarks that define a deluded cultural transmission. They include political convenience, economic expediency, social suitability, religious tolerance, and legalization. All seem necessary for a false meme to become culturally prescribed. Purveyors of false memes willfully ignore the questioning of ideas upon which their misinformation is based --- a hallmark of science. Without the support of science we find ourselves in a festering haze of delusion.

With regard to its population dynamics, our evolving memetic species has a vital task. Substitute a scientifically founded meme for the unquestioned false one. Then the new meme would be: increases in the total production of food for human consumption lead to a global population increase of H. sapiens. We would acknowledge not only that we have a food distribution problem but also a problem derived from our tragic failure to use available ways and means to prevent unwanted births humanely.

How the human community chooses to act in response to this daunting predicament is something others more capable than I will have to address and find a way to overcome. Years ago, before the 21st century began to unfold, my spouse advised me not to communicate the ecological science of human population dynamics until I had a solution to the existential situation disclosed by the evidence. I told her then and say to all now, I do not have answers to the thorny questions or solutions to difficult problems the heretofore uncontested science raises. Please allow me to add the belief that any program of action to rein in the size of the human population by limiting the human food supply must begin by taking simultaneous steps to feed the human community as well as to save the flourishing of life (i.e., biodiversity) as we know it.

It is neither necessary nor sustainable to continue increasing food production to feed a growing human population. To the contrary, such a determination ultimately carries with it profoundly harmful consequences. In the case of H. sapiens the species eats itself out of house and home.
Your theories sound like they are about animals and not humans.

If human societies need to be tricked or coerced to prevent over-breeding then they shouldn't exist as humans in the first place.
 

ThunderCat

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Your theories sound like they are about animals and not humans.

If human societies need to be tricked or coerced to prevent over-breeding then they shouldn't exist as humans in the first place.

I don't know if you read the article or not. But it argues the same biological laws apply to humans as they do to animals.

Humans stand unique because they can feed millions of their kind, allowing them to grow, unlike animals. BTW how are these "my theories?"

You thought I wrote all those research papers? Do you know the famous Lynx-Hare cycle for example was not produced by me.

It's actually known throughout the field of ecology.
 
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Dalit

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It is a catastrophe in the making. A country with an incredibly corrupt political system. A n army that takes dictation from a superpower. A population that has no clueless on so many fronts. A big catastrophe.
 

hembo

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Man in Quetta becomes father of 60th child


Our Staff Reporter
January 02, 2023


QUETTA - Another child has been born on the very first day of the year 2023 to the wife of Jan Mohammad, a resident of Quetta, after which the total number of his children has reached to 60. Jan Muhammad’s 60 children have been born from three wives while 5 of his children have died. 55 children of Jan Muhammad are alive and healthy. Talking to newsmen, Jan Muhammad said that he was very happy with the birth of another child on the arrival of the new year. He said that the child was named Haji Khush Khal Khan. It may be mentioned here that Jan Muhammad’s three wives and children live in the same house. Jan Muhammad is a compounder by profession and runs his own clinic in the suburbs. The man of many children also desires another marriage for which the search for a fourth wife is on. In his statement in the past, Jan Muhammad said that his goal was to have 100 children and he was very grateful to Allah for bestowing him more children.
 

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