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West inciting racial war in Singapore?

Song Hong

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While US is forcing Singapore fall in line against China, and Singapore resisting it, there is a sudden deluge of highly inciting material circulating. They are produced by swarms of NGO, journalists, large news agencies, activists, media personalities and even university professors accusing Singapore Chinese of discriminating minorities.

Many of these information are certainly setting the stage for a racial war. Many Singapore minorities hate Chinese even more as the result.

Good luck Singapore.

******************

https://www.eurasiareview.com/30062020-singapores-malay-dilemma-analysis/

There has always been a feeling among Singapore’s ethnic Malays that they are second-class citizens within their own land. The government’s endless pursuit of building a strong sense of a Singaporean national identity has come up short within the 750,000-odd Malays who make up 13.5 percent of the population.

The Singaporean constitution recognizes the special position of the Malays, who are officially defined as the indigenous people of Singapore. This section also gives the government the responsibility to protect, safeguard, support, foster, and promote their political, educational, religious, economic, social and cultural interests, and their language.

Although Malays have progressed with the growing affluence of Singapore, Malays still earn 25 percent less than the national average, lagging far behind ethnic Chinese and Indians. Malays are still participating in higher-education below par with the rest of the Singaporean population, leading to a great under-representation within the professional classes, elite government positions, armed forces and police. Malays have a much higher incidence of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, heart conditions and other fatal diseases, than the rest of the population.

What’s more, Malays have been blamed for this in the public media as having a cultural deficit, being stereotyped as undertaking unhealthy cultural practices.

They suffer discrimination in hiring, are the first group laid off due to business shutdowns from Covid-19 restrictions, are over-represented in crime, drug abuse and the prison population. Even with their status protected by the constitution place, Malays are seriously hindered by regulations restricting the operation of traditional small-scale business enterprises (Niaga kecil/gerai) from home. Consequently, the incidence of social and economic poverty in Singapore falls primarily on ethnic Malays, with a prevailing sense of anguish within the community.

The constitution states that there shall be no discrimination against citizens of Singapore on the ground of religion, race, descent or place of birth in any law or in the appointment to any office under a public authority or in the administration of any law relating to the acquisition, holding or disposition of property or the establishing or carrying on of any trade, business, profession, vocation, or employment.

However, the government’s ethnic integration program (EIP) and Housing Development Board (HDB) policy of allocating apartments within estates to reflect the multiracial composition of Singapore society has totally ignored the cultural context of the Malay kampong. This sense of community, a pillar of Malay culture, has been totally destroyed.

Racial marking within HDB estates has institutionalized ethnic identity, leading to discrimination. This has brought restrictions upon Malays buying and selling apartments in HDB estates, effectively marginalizing them within the housing market.

Within the Singapore Armed Forces discrimination is blatant. In 1987 Lee Hsien Loong, then second minister of defense, said “if there is a conflict, if the SAF is called upon to defend our homeland, we don’t want to put any of our soldiers in a difficult position where the emotions for the nation may come into conflict with his emotions for religion, because these two very strong fundamentals, and if they are not compatible, then they will be two very destructive forces in opposite directions.”

In 1999, Lee Kwan Yew himself echoed the same sentiments about the conflict of interest Malays might have if Singapore was in conflict with Malaysia. However, Singapore’s Malays had a long tradition of service in the armed forces under British colonial command. Removing them from combat positions into logistics and administration has been very difficult to accept. Subtle methods like using Mandarin at higher ranks act as steep barriers to entry for Malays. This feeling of mistrust erodes any sense of national unity and true Singaporean identity. Malays are deeply dissuaded from pursuing any career within the armed forces. This is a stark contradiction to claims of meritocracy in government.

It’s not just within the armed forces. Many Malays feel discriminated against within the general workforce according to repeated workplace surveys that have found around three-quarters of them feel ignored when applying for jobs. Many say that education, language proficiency and race are negative attributes in job interviews. The organization One People.sg has argued that not enough has been done through employers to address the issue, a major area the government needs to focus upon.

The ban on the wearing of head scarfs or hijabs, is regarded as discriminatory against Malay culture and religion. Despite that, protests and petitions on the ban at government workplaces and schools over the last decade have gone unheeded. This issue led to a backlash against the Singapore mufti, or Islamic jurist, who was perceived as appeasing the official government line, rather than taking an Islamic stance on the issue. The Malay community has perceived the government stand as chauvinistic, as the wearing of the hijab is totally acceptable in many other non-Muslim country civil services and uniformed services around the world.

The Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura (MUIS) is given power by the constitution is the consulting council to advise the president of Singapore on matters regarding Islam, the religion of ethnic Malays. However, the members of the board are appointed by the government, rather than being directly elected by Singapore’s Islamic community.

As Asia Sentinel has reported, there is currently a major inquiry going on concerning corruption within the body’s halal certification operations. In addition, there have been criticisms about the way MUIS has handled Wakaf (donated) property zakat, and Haj cancellations and refunds. The Auditor General’s report uncovered financial mismanagement and interest payments (riba) prohibited under Islamic law used within organizational financial operations. An outpouring of social media posts shows Singapore Muslims’ trust in MUIS is waning amid calls to make MUIS an independent body.

One of the recent and most controversial issues is the position of the president of Singapore, held since 2017 by the long-serving PAP politician and lawyer by profession Halimah Yacob. With the new powers given to the office of president, PAP stalwarts argue that ethnic Malays now have power within the government. However, executive government in reality makes all major decision. The office is still primarily a ceremonial position. Halimah is only the second Muslim to become the president since Singapore became an independent state in 1965. Many ethnic Malays feel that they have been patronized, not seeing any reforms under her reign.

One of these issues is a proposal to teach Bahasa Malay in primary schools, as Malay is the national language and language of Singapore’s national anthem. Inaction has brought rebuke against the president and Malay MPs representing their community, leading to accusations from Malays Underrepresented in Singapore (MUIS) that the representatives are just puppets of the governing People’s Action Party.

There is only one ethnic Malay serving in cabinet, and one in the ministry, while representation within the judiciary and upper echelons of the civil service is far below the ethnic Malay proportion of the population. Criticism is rife about Malay leaders not engaging with the community and speaking up on Malay issues.

An initiative recently announced by Zulkifly Masagos Mohmad, the Minister for the Environment and Water Resources, is a planned program to be led by the minister of state for manpower and national development Zaqy Mohamad, called Ciptasama@M3 to supposedly encourage the community to participate in policymaking. However, an explanation of the program indicates that it plans to focus on issues such as marital problems, support for families of former prisoners and mentoring youths with agencies such as MUIS, MESRA, and MENDAKI, rather than directly with government. This looks more like an outreach set of programs than policy consultation with the ethnic community.

Singapore has been socially engineered by government to reflect the core beliefs of top leaders over the past six decades. In 1990, although Singapore celebrated its 25th anniversary with the slogan “One people, one nation, one Singapore,” the government implemented a new national ideology that stressed the core values of Confucian morality, family loyalty, and placing the nation before oneself. This was a turning point away from multi-culturalism and towards a form of Chinese chauvinism that made Malays feel insecure.

There is however, a very small group of elite and successful Malays who have ostensibly succeeded under Singapore’s meritocracy system. As part of the professional elite, they can network with the decision makers within society, having thrown away the mental shackles of Malay customs to project a pan-Singaporean persona of professionalism. They are the pinup heroes for the cause of meritocracy promoted by the PAP.

The potential to advance themselves requires compromise by the government or sacrifice by ethnic Malays. Malay heritage within the armed forces, police, and civil service has been taken away from them. The kampong has been destroyed and scattered, with traditional business opportunities put out of reach. 9/11 and the rise of ISIS have only made things more difficult for as the security services watch the community closely. The stereotypes have not been broken by a Muslim president. Further, their position in the country’s ethnic mix is being quickly eroded due to immigration. After almost 60 years, Malay loyalty to Singapore is still in doubt by the government.

A number of Malays have emigrated from Singapore to countries like Australia, to become very successful in their professions or business. They have embraced their Malay identities and played major roles in organizing local Malay communities in their adopted countries, and are a great loss for Singapore.

The feelings about these issues are best summed up by Singaporean poet Alfian Sa’at’s words:

“Singapore you are not my country”:
 

sinait

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While US is forcing Singapore fall in line against China, and Singapore resisting it, there is a sudden deluge of highly inciting material circulating. They are produced by swarms of NGO, journalists, large news agencies, activists, media personalities and even university professors accusing Singapore Chinese of discriminating minorities.

Many of these information are certainly setting the stage for a racial war. Many Singapore minorities hate Chinese even more as the result.

Good luck Singapore.

******************

https://www.eurasiareview.com/30062020-singapores-malay-dilemma-analysis/

There has always been a feeling among Singapore’s ethnic Malays that they are second-class citizens within their own land. The government’s endless pursuit of building a strong sense of a Singaporean national identity has come up short within the 750,000-odd Malays who make up 13.5 percent of the population.

The Singaporean constitution recognizes the special position of the Malays, who are officially defined as the indigenous people of Singapore. This section also gives the government the responsibility to protect, safeguard, support, foster, and promote their political, educational, religious, economic, social and cultural interests, and their language.

Although Malays have progressed with the growing affluence of Singapore, Malays still earn 25 percent less than the national average, lagging far behind ethnic Chinese and Indians. Malays are still participating in higher-education below par with the rest of the Singaporean population, leading to a great under-representation within the professional classes, elite government positions, armed forces and police. Malays have a much higher incidence of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, heart conditions and other fatal diseases, than the rest of the population.

What’s more, Malays have been blamed for this in the public media as having a cultural deficit, being stereotyped as undertaking unhealthy cultural practices.

They suffer discrimination in hiring, are the first group laid off due to business shutdowns from Covid-19 restrictions, are over-represented in crime, drug abuse and the prison population. Even with their status protected by the constitution place, Malays are seriously hindered by regulations restricting the operation of traditional small-scale business enterprises (Niaga kecil/gerai) from home. Consequently, the incidence of social and economic poverty in Singapore falls primarily on ethnic Malays, with a prevailing sense of anguish within the community.

The constitution states that there shall be no discrimination against citizens of Singapore on the ground of religion, race, descent or place of birth in any law or in the appointment to any office under a public authority or in the administration of any law relating to the acquisition, holding or disposition of property or the establishing or carrying on of any trade, business, profession, vocation, or employment.

However, the government’s ethnic integration program (EIP) and Housing Development Board (HDB) policy of allocating apartments within estates to reflect the multiracial composition of Singapore society has totally ignored the cultural context of the Malay kampong. This sense of community, a pillar of Malay culture, has been totally destroyed.

Racial marking within HDB estates has institutionalized ethnic identity, leading to discrimination. This has brought restrictions upon Malays buying and selling apartments in HDB estates, effectively marginalizing them within the housing market.

Within the Singapore Armed Forces discrimination is blatant. In 1987 Lee Hsien Loong, then second minister of defense, said “if there is a conflict, if the SAF is called upon to defend our homeland, we don’t want to put any of our soldiers in a difficult position where the emotions for the nation may come into conflict with his emotions for religion, because these two very strong fundamentals, and if they are not compatible, then they will be two very destructive forces in opposite directions.”

In 1999, Lee Kwan Yew himself echoed the same sentiments about the conflict of interest Malays might have if Singapore was in conflict with Malaysia. However, Singapore’s Malays had a long tradition of service in the armed forces under British colonial command. Removing them from combat positions into logistics and administration has been very difficult to accept. Subtle methods like using Mandarin at higher ranks act as steep barriers to entry for Malays. This feeling of mistrust erodes any sense of national unity and true Singaporean identity. Malays are deeply dissuaded from pursuing any career within the armed forces. This is a stark contradiction to claims of meritocracy in government.

It’s not just within the armed forces. Many Malays feel discriminated against within the general workforce according to repeated workplace surveys that have found around three-quarters of them feel ignored when applying for jobs. Many say that education, language proficiency and race are negative attributes in job interviews. The organization One People.sg has argued that not enough has been done through employers to address the issue, a major area the government needs to focus upon.

The ban on the wearing of head scarfs or hijabs, is regarded as discriminatory against Malay culture and religion. Despite that, protests and petitions on the ban at government workplaces and schools over the last decade have gone unheeded. This issue led to a backlash against the Singapore mufti, or Islamic jurist, who was perceived as appeasing the official government line, rather than taking an Islamic stance on the issue. The Malay community has perceived the government stand as chauvinistic, as the wearing of the hijab is totally acceptable in many other non-Muslim country civil services and uniformed services around the world.

The Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura (MUIS) is given power by the constitution is the consulting council to advise the president of Singapore on matters regarding Islam, the religion of ethnic Malays. However, the members of the board are appointed by the government, rather than being directly elected by Singapore’s Islamic community.

As Asia Sentinel has reported, there is currently a major inquiry going on concerning corruption within the body’s halal certification operations. In addition, there have been criticisms about the way MUIS has handled Wakaf (donated) property zakat, and Haj cancellations and refunds. The Auditor General’s report uncovered financial mismanagement and interest payments (riba) prohibited under Islamic law used within organizational financial operations. An outpouring of social media posts shows Singapore Muslims’ trust in MUIS is waning amid calls to make MUIS an independent body.

One of the recent and most controversial issues is the position of the president of Singapore, held since 2017 by the long-serving PAP politician and lawyer by profession Halimah Yacob. With the new powers given to the office of president, PAP stalwarts argue that ethnic Malays now have power within the government. However, executive government in reality makes all major decision. The office is still primarily a ceremonial position. Halimah is only the second Muslim to become the president since Singapore became an independent state in 1965. Many ethnic Malays feel that they have been patronized, not seeing any reforms under her reign.

One of these issues is a proposal to teach Bahasa Malay in primary schools, as Malay is the national language and language of Singapore’s national anthem. Inaction has brought rebuke against the president and Malay MPs representing their community, leading to accusations from Malays Underrepresented in Singapore (MUIS) that the representatives are just puppets of the governing People’s Action Party.

There is only one ethnic Malay serving in cabinet, and one in the ministry, while representation within the judiciary and upper echelons of the civil service is far below the ethnic Malay proportion of the population. Criticism is rife about Malay leaders not engaging with the community and speaking up on Malay issues.

An initiative recently announced by Zulkifly Masagos Mohmad, the Minister for the Environment and Water Resources, is a planned program to be led by the minister of state for manpower and national development Zaqy Mohamad, called Ciptasama@M3 to supposedly encourage the community to participate in policymaking. However, an explanation of the program indicates that it plans to focus on issues such as marital problems, support for families of former prisoners and mentoring youths with agencies such as MUIS, MESRA, and MENDAKI, rather than directly with government. This looks more like an outreach set of programs than policy consultation with the ethnic community.

Singapore has been socially engineered by government to reflect the core beliefs of top leaders over the past six decades. In 1990, although Singapore celebrated its 25th anniversary with the slogan “One people, one nation, one Singapore,” the government implemented a new national ideology that stressed the core values of Confucian morality, family loyalty, and placing the nation before oneself. This was a turning point away from multi-culturalism and towards a form of Chinese chauvinism that made Malays feel insecure.

There is however, a very small group of elite and successful Malays who have ostensibly succeeded under Singapore’s meritocracy system. As part of the professional elite, they can network with the decision makers within society, having thrown away the mental shackles of Malay customs to project a pan-Singaporean persona of professionalism. They are the pinup heroes for the cause of meritocracy promoted by the PAP.

The potential to advance themselves requires compromise by the government or sacrifice by ethnic Malays. Malay heritage within the armed forces, police, and civil service has been taken away from them. The kampong has been destroyed and scattered, with traditional business opportunities put out of reach. 9/11 and the rise of ISIS have only made things more difficult for as the security services watch the community closely. The stereotypes have not been broken by a Muslim president. Further, their position in the country’s ethnic mix is being quickly eroded due to immigration. After almost 60 years, Malay loyalty to Singapore is still in doubt by the government.

A number of Malays have emigrated from Singapore to countries like Australia, to become very successful in their professions or business. They have embraced their Malay identities and played major roles in organizing local Malay communities in their adopted countries, and are a great loss for Singapore.

The feelings about these issues are best summed up by Singaporean poet Alfian Sa’at’s words:

“Singapore you are not my country”:
Tough luck competing with the Chinese and Indians(Singapore Indians are smart).
That is why we have special education and finacial assistance for the Malays.
But how much assistance to give is subjective and therefore some will always be dissatisfied.

Of note is most Malays in Singapore are not indigenous to our island.
Our female "Malay" President is half Indian and Dr Mahathir, former PM of Malaysia, is Muslim Indian.
Seems like key qualifying criteria is being Muslim.

I was first surprised when my Afghan friend was classified as Malay, so no need to pay school fees at that time.
I asked him why, and his reply was "cheap, cheap".
"cheap, cheap" as in many things are cheaper or free for them when classified as Malay.

For an inkling of what is Malay in Singapore, we take the 3 candidates for the Presidential Election reserved for Malays.
Yes plumb job of President reserved for the our minority with annual salary of S$1,680,000(USD$1,210,076).

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/politics/article/2104516/singapore-how-malay-malay
In Singapore, how Malay is Malay?
The 62-year-old marine sector executive Farid Khan Kaim Khan is listed as a Pakistani, while businessman Mohamed Salleh Marican, 67, is an Indian Muslim.
And Halimah Yacob, the PAP MP and parliamentary speaker widely seen as the establishment’s favoured candidate, also has part Indian lineage.

Almost all of my Malay classmates with roots from Malaysia, have gone back to enjoy even more favored Malay race based policies after finishing free school in Singapore.
Good luck and success to those who left our shores and we will not miss them.
.
 
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Song Hong

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Both Malay and Indian hate one another more than they hate Chinese. In Malay word and dictionary, the meaning of "Indian" is liar, for example Lida Keling.

But since Chinese is majority, Malay and Indian are united in the crusade against "racist Chinese".

Both are lousy people and they act victim.
 
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sinait

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Both Malay and Indian hate one another more than they hate Chinese. In Malay word and dictionary, the meaning of "Indian" is liar, for example Lida Keling.

But since Chinese is majority, Malay and Indian are united in the crusade against racist Chinese.

Both are lousy people and they act victim.
Its true.
The minorities live well with the Chinese.
Different ethnic Indians don't speak with each other but mix well with the Chinese.
The Malays are also at loggerheads with Filipinos.

I guess the majority do better by being more generous when it comes to relations with our minorities.
China does the same where their minorities enjoy education and financial assistance.
Well there is always discontent in any society, key is try to keep them in balance and prevent foreign interference.
.
 

sinait

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Like to add that there was friction between the Indian and Chinese communities after the China Indian war in 1962.
Even the Indian communities fought among themselves when events happened in India.
I think it was after the assasination of Indira Gandhi.

We had many years of nation building and I am happy to note no such things anymore.
.
 

kankan326

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Like to add that there was friction between the Indian and Chinese communities after the China Indian war in 1962.
Even the Indian communities fought among themselves when events happened in India.
I think it was after the assasination of Indira Gandhi.

We had many years of nation building and I am happy to note no such things anymore.
.
Was there any "boycott made in China" movement in Singapore/Malaysia Indian communities?
 

Song Hong

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The Malays like to stir and stir, and accuse everyone of anti Islam. Malay really believe themselves represent Islam at the cosmic struggle of righteous vs evil.

A very small thing could suddenly blown up as Kafir vs Islam and violence start like crazy, not just against Chinese.

When a magistrate sentence a Dutch young girl to her biological mother instead of her Malay foster mother in 1950, Malay went on rioting spree.

A simple custody case was interpreted by Malay as Christian against Islam.

In total, 18 people were killed, among whom were seven Europeans or Eurasians, two police officers, and nine rioters shot by the police or military, 173 were injured, many of them seriously, 119 vehicles were damaged,




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Hertogh

Its true.
The minorities live well with the Chinese.
Different ethnic Indians don't speak with each other but mix well with the Chinese.
The Malays are also at loggerheads with Filipinos.

I guess the majority do better by being more generous when it comes to relations with our minorities.
China does the same where their minorities enjoy education and financial assistance.
Well there is always discontent in any society, key is try to keep them in balance and prevent foreign interference.
.
 
Last edited:

sinait

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The Malays like to stir and stir, and accuse everyone of anti Islam. Malay really believe themselves represent Islam at the cosmic struggle of righteous vs evil.

A very small thing could suddenly blown up as Kafir vs Islam and violence start like crazy, not just against Chinese.

When a magistrate sentence a Dutch young girl to her biological mother instead of her Malay foster mother in 1950, Malay went on rioting spree.

A simple custody case was interpreted by Malay as Christian against Islam.

In total, 18 people were killed, among whom were seven Europeans or Eurasians, two police officers, and nine rioters shot by the police or military, 173 were injured, many of them seriously, 119 vehicles were damaged,




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Hertogh
Acutally true Malays are friendly, amicable easy going people.
They are the most friendly of the main races in Singapore.
Therefore they are well represented in the hospitality services industry.
You will like them if you get to know them.

But unfortunately they are emotionally susceptible to malign instigations.
Pity the guy in the path of their fury when thus aroused, most probably by those masquerading as Malays such as the Indian PM of Malaysia and many with Indian Linage such as our President.
A good example will be that Muslim Indian preacher Sakir Naik trying to stir up racial discord in Malaysia.
Pitfalls of emotional but otherwise peaceful and friendly people who are less sophisticated in logic reasoning.
.
 

Figaro

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The Malays like to stir and stir, and accuse everyone of anti Islam. Malay really believe themselves represent Islam at the cosmic struggle of righteous vs evil.

A very small thing could suddenly blown up as Kafir vs Islam and violence start like crazy, not just against Chinese.

When a magistrate sentence a Dutch young girl to her biological mother instead of her Malay foster mother in 1950, Malay went on rioting spree.

A simple custody case was interpreted by Malay as Christian against Islam.

In total, 18 people were killed, among whom were seven Europeans or Eurasians, two police officers, and nine rioters shot by the police or military, 173 were injured, many of them seriously, 119 vehicles were damaged,




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Hertogh
I have a very good friend whose family is from Malaysia. She says the society is very discriminatory against Chinese people because of their religion and perceived financial success (much like the Jews in Europe). According to her, at restaurants ethnic Chinese have to pay 20% more than the Malays, not to mention the barrage of affirmative action programs. The Malays also deliberately restrict ethnic Chinese from holding power ... so even if they run the economy, they still can't change the obviously discriminatory laws.
 

sinait

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Was there any "boycott made in China" movement in Singapore/Malaysia Indian communities?
Don't think so.
Though we have to be pro US due to historical, economic and security concerns, we are mostly pro China especially the older generation not brainwashed by western media.
How to boycott made in China ??

We should educate these nincompoops and Indians how China made cost of living so affordable for the world.
Some young punks don't realize how expensive things were before China made them affordable.
Rural India and rural Philippines should be very grateful cheap China made led lamps and torchlights brought light to their lives.

Some resentment by our Indian community privately against China and Chinese cannot be avoided.

I have a very good friend whose family is from Malaysia. She says the society is very discriminatory against Chinese people because of their religion and perceived financial success (much like the Jews in Europe). According to her, at restaurants ethnic Chinese have to pay 20% more than the Malays, not to mention the barrage of affirmative action programs. The Malays also deliberately restrict ethnic Chinese from holding power ... so even if they run the economy, they still can't change the obviously discriminatory laws.
Unfortunately race politics is at play especially by fake Malays.
True Malays are simple friendly easily satisfied people, albeit susceptible to manipulation by the unscrupulous.
I would put Muslim Indian preacher Sakir Naik in Malaysia and their former Prime Minister for decades, Mahathir, as not helpful for racial harmony.
.
 

Shantanu_Left

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Singapore is the perfect nation. Other countries should learn from us on how to manage multiple ethnicities. Everyone leaves each other alone and minds their own business. Indians, for example, have their own subcultures within the Indian culture. Not everyone speaks Tamil as you would know.

Eurasian News whatever is an unreliable outlet.
 

Song Hong

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Indians nationals are importing caste system in Singapore. Caste system is worst kind of racism, originally invented to privilege Aryan against Dravidians. Now its against Chinese low caste Indians and Malays in Singapore.

It was highlighted by one former ministers while the current PAP government denies its existence.

There is no longer meritocracy in Singapore but rampant caste system, racism and cronyism in favor of Indians.

Singapore is on the way of shyt hole.

**************************
https://www.asiaone.com/singapore/sinda-must-stay-focused

But they bring other bad habits with them which most of the Indians in Singapore have forgotten or got rid off. They have a very strong sense of caste.

Some Indians here already have a caste problem but the new Indians have a bigger problem. In fact I've heard of instances where, in major American banks, an Indian was put up for promotion by a non-Indian.

The non-Indian boss was told that you better not promote him because he's in the wealth management part of the bank and he's got to talk to other professional Indians to persuade them to put the money with you, and he's not of the caste that they will respect. So can you imagine these are people who studied overseas, outside India, who have done well and now work in an American bank and are still holding on to such caste prejudices.

And that's something that we should reject completely. But they do bring it with them. They may have lived many years outside of India but they remain very strongly caste-conscious. They will deny it. So this particular Indian was not promoted, but was given another job of a higher level which did not involve trying to sell the bank's services to professional Indians. That's something that is very disturbing.

It may even go into languages - division by languages. Whether someone speaks Marathi as against Gujarati. A Gujarati against Indians who are Tamil speakers. Tamils against Telugus and Telugus against Kannadas. This feeling is very strong in India. That's why states are getting divided. The latest is Telangana. So we must ensure that they do not bring this, what I call "primitive ideas", here.

Because it continues to deepen the practices that come from India which are not relevant to Singapore. So if they want to be a part of Singapore and be integrated, they have to get rid of this kind of thinking. They may be upset by what I'm saying, but I think it needs to be said.

I think, among the Indian Singaporeans, caste is probably much less, but it's still there. I mean I'm completely unconscious of people's caste.

And when I was president of SINDA for a few years I had a lot of staff in SINDA. It never occured to me that quite a few of them were Brahmins. But then people began to point out, why are you employing Brahmins in SINDA? I said, "Brahmins? Who is Brahmin?" And then they started giving me the names.

Singapore is the perfect nation. Other countries should learn from us on how to manage multiple ethnicities. Everyone leaves each other alone and minds their own business. Indians, for example, have their own subcultures within the Indian culture. Not everyone speaks Tamil as you would know.

Eurasian News whatever is an unreliable outlet.
 

Shantanu_Left

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Indians nationals are importing caste system in Singapore. Caste system is worst kind of racism, that privilege Aryan against Dravidians.

It was highlighted by one former ministers while the current PAP government denies its existence.

There is no longer meritocracy in Singapore but rampant caste system, racism and cronyism in favor of Indians.

Singapore is on the way of shyt hole.

**************************
https://www.asiaone.com/singapore/sinda-must-stay-focused

But they bring other bad habits with them which most of the Indians in Singapore have forgotten or got rid off. They have a very strong sense of caste.

Some Indians here already have a caste problem but the new Indians have a bigger problem. In fact I've heard of instances where, in major American banks, an Indian was put up for promotion by a non-Indian.

The non-Indian boss was told that you better not promote him because he's in the wealth management part of the bank and he's got to talk to other professional Indians to persuade them to put the money with you, and he's not of the caste that they will respect. So can you imagine these are people who studied overseas, outside India, who have done well and now work in an American bank and are still holding on to such caste prejudices.

And that's something that we should reject completely. But they do bring it with them. They may have lived many years outside of India but they remain very strongly caste-conscious. They will deny it. So this particular Indian was not promoted, but was given another job of a higher level which did not involve trying to sell the bank's services to professional Indians. That's something that is very disturbing.

It may even go into languages - division by languages. Whether someone speaks Marathi as against Gujarati. A Gujarati against Indians who are Tamil speakers. Tamils against Telugus and Telugus against Kannadas. This feeling is very strong in India. That's why states are getting divided. The latest is Telangana. So we must ensure that they do not bring this, what I call "primitive ideas", here.

Because it continues to deepen the practices that come from India which are not relevant to Singapore. So if they want to be a part of Singapore and be integrated, they have to get rid of this kind of thinking. They may be upset by what I'm saying, but I think it needs to be said.

I think, among the Indian Singaporeans, caste is probably much less, but it's still there. I mean I'm completely unconscious of people's caste.

And when I was president of SINDA for a few years I had a lot of staff in SINDA. It never occured to me that quite a few of them were Brahmins. But then people began to point out, why are you employing Brahmins in SINDA? I said, "Brahmins? Who is Brahmin?" And then they started giving me the names.
Not everyone practices caste in India: I am an outcaste and not even a proper Hindu. This article is biased against 1st generation naturalized citizens of Indian origin.

The Tamils have their subculture, and as I said, I am not part of it because I don't speak Tamil/.
 

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