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Water Crisis in Pakistan: News and Discussions

Discussion in 'Social & Current Events' started by Proudpakistaniguy, May 30, 2018.

  1. alimobin memon

    alimobin memon FULL MEMBER

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    This is a collective problem blaming PPP only is not going to resolve the water shortage issue. PPP should be only blamed for tanker mafia stuff. In my opinion building large dam is dangerous and strategically critical. Imagine in case of war if enemy strikes gigantic dam like kalabagh most of the water reserve could deplete in a minutes. instead build multiple smaller 1/4th size of kalabagh adjacent to first of the series of dams to be build this would ensure and have security of mind that not all water reserves could be depleted.
     
  2. AZ1

    AZ1 SENIOR MEMBER

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    PPP is worse than you think. Huge amount of water just waste because of the leakage in the pipeline underground and that cause roads destruction also but they mever repair it they dont work
     
  3. alimobin memon

    alimobin memon FULL MEMBER

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    Stop blaming and find solution now, PPP is at fault no doubt but we need solution more than anything now.
     
  4. AZ1

    AZ1 SENIOR MEMBER

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    Solution is to repair the leak pipeline lets start with the cheapest and quicker one but guess what who will do these.jobs.
     
  5. Dubious

    Dubious MODERATOR

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    Call to make Indus waters treaty part of foreign policy
    Khaleeq KianiUpdated June 07, 2018

    [​IMG]

    ISLAMABAD: Pakistan must change its cropping patterns, water usage habits and planning mechanisms, and develop multiple storages and make the 1960 Indus Waters Treaty part of an aggressive foreign policy if it intends to avoid a disastrous future.

    This was the crux of a detailed briefing by retired Lt Gen Muzammil Hussain to a Senate body on Wednesday. The Water and Power Development Authority (Wapda) chairman also criticised the resettlement plan for the Diamer-Bhasha dam prepared by the government led by Gen Pervez Musharraf in 2006, and said that it was causing problems to this day.

    Stressing the importance of the Kalabagh dam, the Wapda chief proposed to give its operations and management to Sindh given the province’s genuine concerns that it would dry out. He said the country should now graduate from decades-old planning processes, time-consuming approval processes and execution of projects through innovative financing solutions for major development projects.

    Lamenting that Pakistan had become hostage to a group of five international consulting firms, Mr Hussain said a professional organisation like the National Engineering Services of Pakistan (Nespak) had been reduced to a parking place with more than 921 incompetent and unqualified inductions made on political grounds.

    He said the capacity and the quality of local companies and consultants had to be enhanced to meet the growing future needs of agriculture, irrigation and energy.

    In his remarks, he observed that 60 per cent of the country’s population was directly engaged in agriculture and livestock and despite being named in the 15 most water scarce countries — with a per capita availability of about 903 cubic metres — Pakistan had one of the most water intensive agricultural sectors in the world. He said the country had the fourth highest rate of water use internationally. The chairman said that 90pc of the country’s water was used in agriculture and the matter must be taken up in the Council of Common Interests to figure out a way to reduce water usage for irrigation and domestic use.

    He said Pakistan had a total of 155 dams compared to the 5,102 in India. Pakistan can only store water for 30 days compared to the 170 days’ capacity of India. Pakistan needs to narrow the gap between the growing population and its needs and the number and capacity of water reservoirs. There is need to reduce the cultivation of sugarcane and other water intensive crops.

    The Wapda chief said the population is set to grow by 50 per cent to 312 million by 2050, which would push demand for water considerably. Therefore, the country is destined for disaster unless it changes its planning, practices and governance methods quickly.

    For this, he said parliamentarians and political leaders must play a major role. He said about 12 million acre feet (MAF) of water could easily be conserved through efficient use, another 11MAF could be saved by provinces through better managing the demand. A further 12MAF could be saved through lining of canals, and 35MAF could be made available through construction of dams.

    He said Wapda was working on adding one MAF storage by 2023 through small dams while about 9MAF storage would become available by 2030 on the completion of the Diamer-Bhasha, Mohmand, Kurram Tangi and Chiniot dams. Plans were also underway for the development of Kalabagh, Shyok, Dudhial, Akhori, Skardu and Rohtas dams to provide additional storage of another 25MAF by 2050.

    The three-phased development plan would need a cumulative financing of Rs5 trillion in more than three decades. With public sector financing of 30pc, the remaining funds could be arranged through public-private partnerships and commercial arrangements, he said.

    Responding to questions from senators, the Wapda chairman said Sindh had some genuine concerns over the Kalabagh Dam, which is otherwise technically a sound project, and on which construction could begin in a day — realizing enormous benefits.

    He said maximum river flows were available over three months and more than 25MAF water went down the sea excluding the 8.6MAF allocated for downstream Kotri for environmental needs. This meant water downstream kotri could be maintained round the year with the Kalabagh dam instead of just for a few weeks.

    Responding to another question, he said Khyber Pakhtunkhwa’s (KP) objections over the Kalabagh dam were not valid because the dam’s objectionable height had been reduced by 10 feet while now under construction Mohmand dam would completely alleviate any dangers of flooding in the Peshawar and Nowshera valleys. He said it was for the political leadership to create a consensus on the project.

    Mr Muzammil said they were facing problems over the Bhasha dam due to KP and Gilgit-Baltistan (GB) not cooperating and despite a land acquisition worth Rs80 billion, authorities have been unable to start the project. The land owners were also creating problems, as he added that about a dozen people have lost their lives due to firing on land on the boundaries of KP and GB.

    Talking about the Indus Cascade, he termed it the most precious asset of the country. He said that the Indus enters Pakistan at an altitude of 8430 feet and gives us a drop of 7030 feet till Kalabagh at an altitude of 1400 feet giving us multiple sites along the stretach for building reservoirs and run-of-the-river projects.

    He said due to the contentions between Pakhtunkhwa Energy Development Board (PEDO) and the federally-run, Peshawar Electric Supply Company (PESCO), Chitral was not getting the required power supply, getting only seven megawatts of electricity from a plant of 36 megawatts.

    Published in Dawn, June 7th, 2018

    https://www.dawn.com/news/1412565


    What should HAVE been done by was making treatment plants and using treated water in the fields instead of wasting 90% of it on agriculture!!!

    Blaming one another...picking on 1-2 provinces when even Pubjab and Balochistan are equally dry! Ask the farmers!
     
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  6. Path-Finder

    Path-Finder ELITE MEMBER

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  7. Dubious

    Dubious MODERATOR

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    Water crisis: Why is Pakistan running dry?
    Pakistan could "run dry" by 2025 as its water shortage is reaching an alarming level. The authorities remain negligent about the crisis that's posing a serious threat to the country's stability, reports Shah Meer Baloch.

    According to a recent report by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Pakistan ranks third in the world among countries facing acute water shortage. Reports by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources (PCRWR) also warn the authorities that the South Asian country will reach absolute water scarcity by 2025.

    "No person in Pakistan, whether from the north with its more than 5,000 glaciers, or from the south with its 'hyper deserts,' will be immune to this [scarcity]," said Neil Buhne, UN humanitarian coordinator for Pakistan.

    Researchers predict that Pakistan is on its way to becoming the most water-stressed country in the region by the year 2040.

    It is not the first time that development and research organizations have alerted Pakistani authorities about an impending crisis, which some analysts say poses a bigger threat to the country than terrorism.

    In 2016, PCRWR reported that Pakistan touched the "water stress line" in 1990 and crossed the "water scarcity line" in 2005. If this situation persists, Pakistan is likely to face an acute water shortage or a drought-like situation in the near future, according to PCRWR, which is affiliated to the South Asian country's Ministry of Science and Technology.

    A water-intensive country
    Pakistan has the world's fourth-highest rate of water use. Its water intensity rate — the amount of water, in cubic meters, used per unit of GDP — is the world's highest. This suggests that no country's economy is more water-intensive than Pakistan's.

    According to the IMF, Pakistan's per capita annual water availability is 1,017 cubic meters — perilously close to the scarcity threshold of 1,000 cubic meters. Back in 2009, Pakistan's water availability was about 1,500 cubic meters.

    The bulk of Pakistan's farmland is irrigated through a canal system, but the IMF says in a report that canal water is vastly underpriced, recovering only a quarter of annual operating and maintenance costs. Meanwhile, agriculture, which consumes almost all annual available surface water, is largely untaxed.

    Experts say that population growth and urbanization are the main reasons behind the crisis. The issue has also been exacerbated by climate change, poor water management and a lack of political will to deal with the crisis.

    "Pakistan is approaching the scarcity threshold for water. What is even more disturbing is that groundwater supplies — the last resort of water supply — are being rapidly depleted. And worst of all is that the authorities have given no indication that they plan to do anything about any of this," Michael Kugelman, South Asia expert at the Washington-based Woodrow Wilson Center, told DW in a 2015 interview.

    Qazi Talhat, a secretary at the Ministry of Water Resources, told DW the situation is "scary" for Pakistan.

    Water scarcity is also triggering security conflicts in the country. Experts say the economic impact of the water crisis is immense, and the people are fighting for resources.

    Climate change

    Water scarcity in Pakistan has been accompanied by rising temperatures. In May, at least 65 people died from heatstroke in the southern city of Karachi. In 2015, at least 1,200 people died during a spate of extremely hot weather.

    "Heat waves and droughts in Pakistan are a result of climate change," Mian Ahmed Naeem Salik, an environmental expert and research fellow at the Institute of Strategic Studies in Islamabad, told DW.

    "The monsoon season has become erratic in the past few years. The winter season has shrunk from four to two months in many parts of the country. On top of it, Pakistan cannot save floodwater due to a scarcity of dams," Salik said. "At the time of Pakistan's birth in 1947, forests accounted for about 5 percent of the nation's area, but they have now dropped to only 2 percent. Pakistan must invest in building water reservoirs and plant more trees," he added.

    Water politics


    The Tarbela and Mangla dams, the country's two major water reservoirs, reached their "dead" levels last week, according to media reports. The news sparked a debate on social media over the inaction of authorities in the face of this crisis.

    "We have only two big reservoirs and we can save water only for 30 days. India can store water for 190 days whereas the US can do it for 900 days," Muhammad Khalid Rana, a spokesman for the Indus River System Authority (IRSA), told DW.

    "Pakistan receives around 145 million acre feet of water every year but can only save 13.7 million acre feet. Pakistan needs 40 million acre feet of water but 29 million acre feet of our floodwater is wasted because we have few dams. New Delhi raised this issue with international bodies, arguing that it should be allowed to use the western rivers because Pakistan can't use them properly," Rana said.

    In 1960, the World Bank brokered the Indus Water Treaty (IWT) that gives Pakistan exclusive rights to use the region's western rivers — Indus, Jhelum and Chenaub — while India has the authority over three eastern rivers.

    The Pakistani government says New Delhi is not fulfilling its responsibilities under the IWT as it voices concerns over India's construction of new dams. New Delhi is building the Kishangaga hydroelectric plant in the north of Bandipore in India-administered Jammu and Kashmir region. In May, Islamabad approached the World Bank complaining that India violated the IWT by building the dam on a Jehlum River basin, which it lays claim on.

    Kugelman says that the Pakistani authorities need to step up efforts to overcome the water crisis, which is partly man-made. "First of all, Pakistan's leaders and stakeholders need to take ownership of this challenge and declare their intention to tackle it. Simply blaming previous governments, or blaming India, for the crisis won't solve anything. Next, the government needs to institute a major paradigm shift that promotes more judicious use of water," Kugelman emphasized.

    Wastage of water

    Apart from the water storage issue, experts say that water wastage is also a big issue in the country. Abid Suleri, executive director of the Islamabad-based Sustainable Development Policy Institute, says the mismanagement takes place at many levels.

    As the water crisis worsens in Pakistan, foreign diplomats and activists have taken to social media, urging people to save water.

    "Using a bucket to save water while washing my car! #Pakistan ranks third amongst countries facing water shortage. One major reason is excessive use. 100 liters wasted washing a car with running tap water. Many ways to #SaveWater in our daily life! #SaveWaterforPak," Martin Kobler, German ambassador to Pakistan, wrote on Twitter.

    In April, former PM Shahid Khaqan Abbasi announced Pakistan's first National Water Policy, promising consolidated efforts to tackle the water crisis.

    But experts are skeptical about the authorities will to deal with the issue. The country will hold general elections on July 25 and there is an interim government currently in place. Water crisis is a priority neither for the caretaker government nor for the political parties contesting the polls.

    http://www.dw.com/en/water-crisis-why-is-pakistan-running-dry/a-44110280
     
  8. FalconsForPeace

    FalconsForPeace SENIOR MEMBER

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    People in power responsible for water crisis: CJP

    People in power are responsible for water crisis as they only ask for vote and do not provide basic necessities to the public, remarked Chief Justice of Pakistan Justice Saqib Nisar on Thursday.

    While hearing a suo motu notice on water crisis, the chief justice observed that government did not do anything during the last two years to ensure steady supply of water.

    He questioned the government’s performance and asked if they prioritised water crisis and arrange for any funds to fill the gaps.

    The chief justice observed that water along with minerals worth billions was being wasted in the country. “I feel like begging for charity to construct dams and pay off debt,” he said while expressing anger on the matter.

    The additional attorney general, who was present at the hearing, spoke about water crisis in Islamabad, saying the federal capital needed 120 million gallons of water but was being supplied less than half its demand – 58.7 million gallons.

    He said the rural areas on the other hand were not receiving water at all.

    To this, the chief justice said that after Karachi, Islamabad was in need of tankers.

    Moreover, the top judge remarked that water was not flowing into Simly Dam due to failed policies.

    Also present at the hearing, the officials of Metropolitan Corporation Islamabad said no money was spent on water supply schemes after 1960. They further said that there was no choice but to channel water from Tarbela Dam.

    The chief justice observed that practical steps were needed to solve the water crisis.

    He therefore sought recommendations on water policy within 10 days and adjourned the hearing.

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/198355-people-in-power-responsible-for-water-crisis-cjp
     
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  9. MH65

    MH65 FULL MEMBER

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    Here is hussain haqqani playing ball-boy to indians against kalabagh dam KBD.png

    who was that politician who stated that if KBD is built then the punjabis will steal all our electricity from the river?
     
  10. Dubious

    Dubious MODERATOR

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    Use of tube wells causing water shortage in Islamabad: CJP

    ISLAMABAD: The owners of tube wells are acquiring water for free and selling to residents of the federal capital, which is causing the shortage, remarked Chief Justice of Pakistan Justice Saqib Nisar on Friday.

    During the hearing on suo motu notice over water scarcity ,eight alleged owners of tube wells, additional attorney general and officials from the Metropolitan Corporation Islamabad were present in the court.

    One of the suspects, Zamrud Khan, told the court he did not own one but said the entire Cantonment was full of tube wells as the area was faced with sever water crisis.

    He requested the court to issue orders for supply of water through alternate sources before the tube wells are closed down as Cantonment Board and Capital Development Authority were not cooperating with each other over the issue.

    To this, the chief justice remarked that water shortage was mainly being caused by the owners of tube wells.

    A representative of Metropolitan Corporation Islamabad, who was present in the court, said they would impose taxes on the use of tube wells.

    When asked how many days the authority would take to levy the tax, the representative sought 15 days.

    The chief justice sought details on tube wells from CDA, Cantonment Board and Metropolitan Corporation Islamabad. He also ordered reply on the issue from the executive office of Rawalpindi Cantonment Board and managing director of Water and Sanitation Authority within 10 days.

    https://www.geo.tv/latest/198487-use-of-tube-wells-causing-water-shortage-in-islamabad-cjp
     
  11. abcxyz0000

    abcxyz0000 BANNED

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    The structure is so beautiful.
     
  12. Sugarcane

    Sugarcane ELITE MEMBER

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    The people who are against building dams must be treated same as terrorists, in fact even worse because a terrorists can kill people in thousands at max but depriving people from water have put millions of lives at stake.
     
  13. S.R.H. Hashmi

    S.R.H. Hashmi FULL MEMBER

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    Most of our leaders' priority is to make quick money. As for people, and their problems, they can wait

    The comparison of number of dams built in India and Pakistan respectively shows very clearly what a useless lot our leaders have been
     
  14. danishwar

    danishwar BANNED

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    both countries are facing water crisis .
     
  15. hazzam

    hazzam BANNED

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    good suggestion .