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Vietnamese Smartphone Brand Aims To Take Market Share Away From Chinese Rivals

Viet

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Vietnamese models present VinSmart’s new[+]
KAO NGUYEN/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES


As in much of Southeast Asia, smartphones made by Samsung and a short list of Chinese brands dominate the Vietnamese market. They have enough specs, from cameras to screen size, that users want. They run on Google’s familiar Android system. And they cost less than an iPhone. That’s all ideal for a developing country.

Over the years, several Vietnamese companies have tried to grab a share of their own increasingly prosperous market but found little traction. The foreign brands had come in before Vietnam’s own could get started.

But this year, Vietnamese conglomerate Vingroup aims to overtake some of the Chinese brands. Its phone unit will seek that lead by giving Vietnamese consumers a roster of sought-after specs, keeping prices around $100 per phone and marketing them offline in ways that foreign brands would have trouble matching.

Turning point

The conglomerate owned by Vietnam’s richest man, Pham Nhat Vuong, saw its smartphone share surge after initial sales of its Joy 3 model on February 14, says Vsmart deputy CEO Tran Minh Trung. The company sold 12,000 phones in 14 hours, Tran notes, because consumers liked the localized features.

“Even though Vsmart phones use Android operating system, Vsmart’s software engineering department customized the original Android operating system to develop it into a VOS operating system with features specific to Vietnamese consumers,” the deputy CEO says, using the system’s proprietary name. The phones run faster than normal for an Android phone and support free Vsmart-to-Vsmart messaging plus free calls between Vsmart devices, he adds.

Tran’s firm had a 6% market share as of the end of 2019, lower than the market leader Samsung at 32% as well as behind Chinese brands Oppo at 23%, Vivo with 11% and Xiaomi at 9%, tech market research firm Canalys calculates. Fellow market research firm IDC gave Vsmart a 12.4% share in the fourth quarter of last year, compared to Samsung at 29.9% and Oppo at 19.1%. It says about 5 million phones sold in Vietnam that quarter.

Using the Vingroup network

Aggressive offline sales work in Vietnam could raise Vsmart’s domestic share as high as 15% this year, Canalys mobility analyst Matthew Xie says. About 85% of sales in Vietnam take place offline, he estimates.

To be sure, the coronavirus outbreak in Vietnam has hobbled transportation, Xie notes, meaning the country’s overall smartphone market will decline by 1% to 16% “considering the offline channel would be severely impacted.”

But Vsmart can “leverage” Vingroup’s other lines of business for marketing, he says. Vingroup runs a wide network of malls, convenience stores and resorts and housing developments in Vietnam. The vendor had already distributed 100,000 phones free to people living in Vinhomes-brand properties.

Low prices, higher market share

Price is another push point. Vietnam, despite its quick economic growth since 2012 and a booming middle class, remains a market where entry-level phones priced around $200 command about 67%, Xie says. That composition “makes it feasible for Vinsmart to start from entry-level devices production and upgrade into premium device manufacturing step by step,” he says.

Joy 3 phones start at $98 apiece. They come with Snapdragon 632 processors, 6.5-inch screens a three-rear camera cluster system with an 8MP selfie camera. Vsmart has previously offered “pricing schemes” for phones priced at less than $150 but comparing in specs to its Chinese competitors, Nguyen says.

Vsmart must use pricing schemes to catch the competition, says Lam Nguyen, managing director with IDC Indochina in Ho Chi Minh City. To that end, it has joined the Vietnamese Ministry of Information and Communications smartphone “universalization” program by offering handsets for 500,000 Vietnamese dong ($21.60) apiece in exchange for wireless packages and preinstalled apps, Nguyen says.

Partnerships outside Vingroup

Tie-ups like that one should help Vsmart build an “ecosystem” aimed at netting and keeping customers, Nguyen says. It’s also working toward an “partnership” with domestic telecom firm Viettel, the Hanoi Times reports.

“Forming a partnership alliance and building an ecosystem will likely forge VSmart to move ahead of its competitors,” Nguyen says. “Failure to do that will have a reverse effect, as well.”

Vsmart hopes to work more closely with Google, too, Tran says. The pair would “strategically” look for ways of using Android-powered operating systems in wireless-controlled devices such as television sets, he says. The duo has already started on TVs.

Source: Forbes
 

Viva_Viet

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Vietnamese models present VinSmart’s new[+]
KAO NGUYEN/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES


As in much of Southeast Asia, smartphones made by Samsung and a short list of Chinese brands dominate the Vietnamese market. They have enough specs, from cameras to screen size, that users want. They run on Google’s familiar Android system. And they cost less than an iPhone. That’s all ideal for a developing country.

Over the years, several Vietnamese companies have tried to grab a share of their own increasingly prosperous market but found little traction. The foreign brands had come in before Vietnam’s own could get started.

But this year, Vietnamese conglomerate Vingroup aims to overtake some of the Chinese brands. Its phone unit will seek that lead by giving Vietnamese consumers a roster of sought-after specs, keeping prices around $100 per phone and marketing them offline in ways that foreign brands would have trouble matching.

Turning point

The conglomerate owned by Vietnam’s richest man, Pham Nhat Vuong, saw its smartphone share surge after initial sales of its Joy 3 model on February 14, says Vsmart deputy CEO Tran Minh Trung. The company sold 12,000 phones in 14 hours, Tran notes, because consumers liked the localized features.

“Even though Vsmart phones use Android operating system, Vsmart’s software engineering department customized the original Android operating system to develop it into a VOS operating system with features specific to Vietnamese consumers,” the deputy CEO says, using the system’s proprietary name. The phones run faster than normal for an Android phone and support free Vsmart-to-Vsmart messaging plus free calls between Vsmart devices, he adds.

Tran’s firm had a 6% market share as of the end of 2019, lower than the market leader Samsung at 32% as well as behind Chinese brands Oppo at 23%, Vivo with 11% and Xiaomi at 9%, tech market research firm Canalys calculates. Fellow market research firm IDC gave Vsmart a 12.4% share in the fourth quarter of last year, compared to Samsung at 29.9% and Oppo at 19.1%. It says about 5 million phones sold in Vietnam that quarter.

Using the Vingroup network

Aggressive offline sales work in Vietnam could raise Vsmart’s domestic share as high as 15% this year, Canalys mobility analyst Matthew Xie says. About 85% of sales in Vietnam take place offline, he estimates.

To be sure, the coronavirus outbreak in Vietnam has hobbled transportation, Xie notes, meaning the country’s overall smartphone market will decline by 1% to 16% “considering the offline channel would be severely impacted.”

But Vsmart can “leverage” Vingroup’s other lines of business for marketing, he says. Vingroup runs a wide network of malls, convenience stores and resorts and housing developments in Vietnam. The vendor had already distributed 100,000 phones free to people living in Vinhomes-brand properties.

Low prices, higher market share

Price is another push point. Vietnam, despite its quick economic growth since 2012 and a booming middle class, remains a market where entry-level phones priced around $200 command about 67%, Xie says. That composition “makes it feasible for Vinsmart to start from entry-level devices production and upgrade into premium device manufacturing step by step,” he says.

Joy 3 phones start at $98 apiece. They come with Snapdragon 632 processors, 6.5-inch screens a three-rear camera cluster system with an 8MP selfie camera. Vsmart has previously offered “pricing schemes” for phones priced at less than $150 but comparing in specs to its Chinese competitors, Nguyen says.

Vsmart must use pricing schemes to catch the competition, says Lam Nguyen, managing director with IDC Indochina in Ho Chi Minh City. To that end, it has joined the Vietnamese Ministry of Information and Communications smartphone “universalization” program by offering handsets for 500,000 Vietnamese dong ($21.60) apiece in exchange for wireless packages and preinstalled apps, Nguyen says.

Partnerships outside Vingroup

Tie-ups like that one should help Vsmart build an “ecosystem” aimed at netting and keeping customers, Nguyen says. It’s also working toward an “partnership” with domestic telecom firm Viettel, the Hanoi Times reports.

“Forming a partnership alliance and building an ecosystem will likely forge VSmart to move ahead of its competitors,” Nguyen says. “Failure to do that will have a reverse effect, as well.”

Vsmart hopes to work more closely with Google, too, Tran says. The pair would “strategically” look for ways of using Android-powered operating systems in wireless-controlled devices such as television sets, he says. The duo has already started on TVs.

Source: Forbes
CN labours cost is much higher, so their phone is less competitive in price. With same specs, Vinphones r simply cheaper than CN phones.

Thats why I said, CN leaders r so stupid when raising CN workers' salary too fast, so now , their products is less competitive in price and soon will lose all the market in the world :cool:
 

50cent

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Vietnamese models present VinSmart’s new[+]
KAO NGUYEN/AFP VIA GETTY IMAGES


As in much of Southeast Asia, smartphones made by Samsung and a short list of Chinese brands dominate the Vietnamese market. They have enough specs, from cameras to screen size, that users want. They run on Google’s familiar Android system. And they cost less than an iPhone. That’s all ideal for a developing country.

Over the years, several Vietnamese companies have tried to grab a share of their own increasingly prosperous market but found little traction. The foreign brands had come in before Vietnam’s own could get started.

But this year, Vietnamese conglomerate Vingroup aims to overtake some of the Chinese brands. Its phone unit will seek that lead by giving Vietnamese consumers a roster of sought-after specs, keeping prices around $100 per phone and marketing them offline in ways that foreign brands would have trouble matching.

Turning point

The conglomerate owned by Vietnam’s richest man, Pham Nhat Vuong, saw its smartphone share surge after initial sales of its Joy 3 model on February 14, says Vsmart deputy CEO Tran Minh Trung. The company sold 12,000 phones in 14 hours, Tran notes, because consumers liked the localized features.

“Even though Vsmart phones use Android operating system, Vsmart’s software engineering department customized the original Android operating system to develop it into a VOS operating system with features specific to Vietnamese consumers,” the deputy CEO says, using the system’s proprietary name. The phones run faster than normal for an Android phone and support free Vsmart-to-Vsmart messaging plus free calls between Vsmart devices, he adds.

Tran’s firm had a 6% market share as of the end of 2019, lower than the market leader Samsung at 32% as well as behind Chinese brands Oppo at 23%, Vivo with 11% and Xiaomi at 9%, tech market research firm Canalys calculates. Fellow market research firm IDC gave Vsmart a 12.4% share in the fourth quarter of last year, compared to Samsung at 29.9% and Oppo at 19.1%. It says about 5 million phones sold in Vietnam that quarter.

Using the Vingroup network

Aggressive offline sales work in Vietnam could raise Vsmart’s domestic share as high as 15% this year, Canalys mobility analyst Matthew Xie says. About 85% of sales in Vietnam take place offline, he estimates.

To be sure, the coronavirus outbreak in Vietnam has hobbled transportation, Xie notes, meaning the country’s overall smartphone market will decline by 1% to 16% “considering the offline channel would be severely impacted.”

But Vsmart can “leverage” Vingroup’s other lines of business for marketing, he says. Vingroup runs a wide network of malls, convenience stores and resorts and housing developments in Vietnam. The vendor had already distributed 100,000 phones free to people living in Vinhomes-brand properties.

Low prices, higher market share

Price is another push point. Vietnam, despite its quick economic growth since 2012 and a booming middle class, remains a market where entry-level phones priced around $200 command about 67%, Xie says. That composition “makes it feasible for Vinsmart to start from entry-level devices production and upgrade into premium device manufacturing step by step,” he says.

Joy 3 phones start at $98 apiece. They come with Snapdragon 632 processors, 6.5-inch screens a three-rear camera cluster system with an 8MP selfie camera. Vsmart has previously offered “pricing schemes” for phones priced at less than $150 but comparing in specs to its Chinese competitors, Nguyen says.

Vsmart must use pricing schemes to catch the competition, says Lam Nguyen, managing director with IDC Indochina in Ho Chi Minh City. To that end, it has joined the Vietnamese Ministry of Information and Communications smartphone “universalization” program by offering handsets for 500,000 Vietnamese dong ($21.60) apiece in exchange for wireless packages and preinstalled apps, Nguyen says.

Partnerships outside Vingroup

Tie-ups like that one should help Vsmart build an “ecosystem” aimed at netting and keeping customers, Nguyen says. It’s also working toward an “partnership” with domestic telecom firm Viettel, the Hanoi Times reports.

“Forming a partnership alliance and building an ecosystem will likely forge VSmart to move ahead of its competitors,” Nguyen says. “Failure to do that will have a reverse effect, as well.”

Vsmart hopes to work more closely with Google, too, Tran says. The pair would “strategically” look for ways of using Android-powered operating systems in wireless-controlled devices such as television sets, he says. The duo has already started on TVs.

Source: Forbes
they got saeye feature as Chinese phone but key to winning is marketing strategy every shop in india is painted with oppo and vivo
 

Samlee

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Yes better phones for the people in Pakistan

Why only buy China phones?



We Are Already On The Road To Manufacturing Our Own Phones Already Assembling of Phones Under Label iTel Tecno G'Five and Much More.PTA Has Given License To More Than Twenty Parties In This Regard.

You Can Try and Launch This Handset In Pakistan But It's Going To Face Tough Competition
 

艹艹艹

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:D

Cách nay vài năm, thị trường trong nước hết sức kỳ vọng trước sự ra đời Smartphone thương hiệu Việt của BKAV với sản phẩm Bphone. Một sản phẩm được xem là thuần Việt từ nghiên cứu đến sản xuất. Thế nhưng, trong khi hầu hết các thương hiệu Smartphone trên thế giới mỗi năm ra một mẫu mới thì Bphone đang dừng lại. Năm 2019, BKAV không ra mắt thế hệ Bphone tiếp theo mà dự kiến dời qua 2020.

Một thương hiệu khác trong làng điện thoại di động Việt cũng nên nhắc đến là Asanzo, vốn cũng đã cho ra đời một vài sản phẩm. Nhưng Asanzo, với sự nhập nhèm về nguồn gốc xuất xứ, thiếu minh bạch xung quanh các vấn đề liên quan đến thuế… khiến doanh nghiệp này rơi vào khó khăn. Những chiếc Smartphone thương hiệu Asanzo S6 với giá chưa đến 2,5 triệu đồng vừa ra mắt vào giữa tháng 11-2019 cũng không còn mấy hút khách.

Thời điểm giữa năm 2019, người tiêu dùng lấy làm tiếc khi một thương hiệu điện thoại di động do người Việt làm chủ, vận hành cũng dần lụi tắt, đó là thương hiệu Mobiistar. Vào cuối tháng 6-2019, Mobiistar thông báo rời khỏi Ấn Độ sau một năm gia nhập thị trường này. Đối tác sản xuất duy nhất của Mobiistar tại Ấn Độ có tên VSun Technologies đã nộp đơn phá sản vào ngày 19-5 và sa thải toàn bộ nhân viên. Điều này dẫn đến sự gián đoạn cho chuỗi cung ứng của Mobiistar tại Ấn Độ. Nguyên nhân của sự phá sản này có một phần ảnh hưởng từ cuộc chiến thương mại Mỹ - Trung.
 

Viet

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We Are Already On The Road To Manufacturing Our Own Phones Already Assembling of Phones Under Label iTel Tecno G'Five and Much More.PTA Has Given License To More Than Twenty Parties In This Regard.

You Can Try and Launch This Handset In Pakistan But It's Going To Face Tough Competition
Very good. Relying too much on foreign imports is the way to disaster. See masks and respirators. Everyone now fights to get them.
 

casual

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Very good. Relying too much on foreign imports is the way to disaster. See masks and respirators. Everyone now fights to get them.
bad comparison. smartphones aren't the same as critical PPE. No one will die without access to them.
 

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