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Usage of "Indian Subcontinent" should be banned, Say "Asian Subcontinent"

-blitzkrieg-

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IJust like modern Islam is not the religion of Muhammed or the Quran, but based on the Hadiths, which in turn take inspiration from Muhammed's teachings & the Quran.
Unlike islam how before muhammad pbuh each prophet prayed to same god as that of muhammad.Vedics had different gods from what hindus worship today..
Our ancestors are Arabis and Turks not Pagans. Pakistan has nothing to do with Vedas and Sanskrit or whatever religion or culture what Indians follow.



Pakistan is an Islamic country and we do not connect ourselves with Vedas. We have adopted a better culture and tradition from Middle east.

You may not connect to it but it doesnt change the fact that locals of present day Pakistan adopted vedic practices after aryan migration from what's now russia. The sintastha culture practices were introduced that got twisted over time and became brahmanism. And in next stage further twisted in medieval ages when they finally started inscripting their so called word of mouth driven rig veda . Everyone knows anything delivered by word mouth changes things altogether yet Hindus are adamant that what they practice is the original belief eventhough their gods are different their culture is different ..
It matters , Pakistanis have nothing to do with Vedas , you are Arabian .
We have Nothing to do with vedas and much to do with vedics.. two completely different things..and No we are not arabs..
 
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ThunderCat

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^^ The migrations from the Pointic steppes to the Indus Valley (Pakistan) that you refer to happened over centuries and not directly from there but through Central Asia during the Bronze Age.

And "Hindus" was a geographical designation, not a religious one. Muslim and British rule changed that.
 

Bawag

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How can you even expect modern boundaries to exactly match to ancient estimates? What matters is if it roughly means the Indian subcontinent.
And also defeated people? Says a Pakistani, lol if delusion had to be personified. :lol:

Says an Indian, a wanna be claimant of 5000 years history and identity of a country which never existed :)
Once again coming on a Pakistani Forum to wipe out his inferiority complex :P
 

ThunderCat

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Kind of stupid remark. Urdu is associated with Muslims. Hindi is associated with Hindus.

Do you even know Pakistani history? It was Syed Ahmad Khan who promoted Urdu.

I oppose the stupid name "urdu" and not the language itself. And there is no such religious group as "Hindu." Responding to academic quotes with laughter shows your intellectual weakness and makes you the laughable one.

The indians named it "urdu" in the 1780s but our forefathers & their Ghaznavid rulers called it Lashkari.

"In fact this mixture of locals and foreigners gave birth to the language of Urdu in Lahore that was called Lashkari Zuban (language of army) at that time."
--Khalid, Kanwal. ''Lahore During the Ghaznavid Period''
 

SIPRA

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I oppose the stupid name "urdu" and not the language itself. And there is no such religious group as "Hindu." Responding to academic quotes with laughter shows your intellectual weakness and makes you the laughable one.

The indians named it "urdu" in the 1780s but our forefathers & their Ghaznavid rulers called it Lashkari.

"In fact this mixture of locals and foreigners gave birth to the language of Urdu in Lahore that was called Lashkari Zuban (language of army) at that time."
--Khalid, Kanwal. ''Lahore During the Ghaznavid Period''

If you go by that, it was traditionally called "Hindvi", in medieval times. Current day Urdu and Hindi, both, are derived from this Hindvi language. I have not seen any medieval reference, where this language is called "Lashkari"; though it seems to have originated in garrisons of Muslim armies.
 
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ThunderCat

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If you go by that, it was traditionally called "Hindvi", in medieval times. Current day Urdu and Hindi, both, are derived from this Hindvi language. I have not seen any medieval reference, where this language is called "Lashkari"; though it seems to have originated in garrisons of Muslim armies.
See the quote I posted from Dr Khalid in my last post. It's one of many sources.

Hindavi, Hindui, Hindustani, Hindi etc. has more geographical context while Zaban-i-Urdu Muhtehda or Lashkari Zaban had a social status to it.

All these names predate "urdu" by centuries. Other names included Lahori, Rekhta and later Dehlavi after the Ghaznavids conquered Delhi.
 
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SIPRA

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See the quote I posted from Dr Khalid in my last post. It's one of many sources.

Hindavi, Hindui, Hindustani, Hindi etc. has more geographical context while Zaban-i-Urdu Muhtehda or Lashkari Zaban had a social status to it.

All these names predate "urdu" by centuries. Other names included Lahori, Rekhta and later Dehlavi after the Ghaznavids conquered Delhi.

Mairay Bhai: I simply said that this language was originally called "Hindvi", in medieval literature, whether by Amir Khusro, or Khawaja Farid Uddin Masud Shakarganj, or by others; and not "Hindi", or "Hindustani", or "Lashkari". These are much later terms.

Dehli became capital of Muslim rule, not during Ghaznavis, but much later when Qutub Uddin Aibak moved to Dehli in 1206.
 

ThunderCat

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Mairay Bhai: I simply said that this language was originally called "Hindvi", in medieval literature, whether by Amir Khusro, or Khawaja Farid Uddin Masud Shakarganj, or by others; and not "Hindi", or "Hindustani", or "Lashkari". These are much later terms.

Dehli became capital of Muslim rule, not during Ghaznavis, but much later when Qutub Uddin Aibak moved to Dehli in 1206.

Lahore was capital of Muslim rule over a century before Delhi.

"In fact this mixture of locals and foreigners gave birth to the language of Urdu in Lahore that was called Lashkari Zuban (language of army) at that time."--Khalid, Kanwal. ''Lahore During the Ghaznavid Period''

Here is also a page from prof Graham Baily's book https://www.cambridge.org/core/jour...the-language/814D9AFC0EBB3ADBB71B4CCD26FAF2D5
 

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