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Tumba

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They are going for Nuclear Submarines in exchange + joint development of 6th Gen Fighter
What 6th Gen fighter... India might lease couple of more akulas but definitely not any more fighters... Russian are left behind by majority of tier 1 military powers in aerospace tech besides engines...
Even south korea is supposedly creating better fighters than Russia
 

akshay gehlot

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Subramanian swamy who is the point person of the US in India for BJP/RSS has already publicly stated that India needs to dump Russia as Russia is not a friend of India.

Russia is not a friend of India

Pro US Author writes pro US article ...Wow what a shocker

For every Swamy who says to dump Russia and embrace SU there are several who claim the opposite , several who in the US FP community who say US will sanction India , several who say it won't ... Taking one of them as gospel and ignoring the others would be sheer stupidity .


The S400 is going happening 100%, There are already teams in Russia that have started training for the platform . https://www.hindustantimes.com/indi...-400-air-defence-systems-101611052111424.html

If Biden and Kopmala do feel the need for CAATSA then we'd rather take CAATSA than cancel the deal , A momentary sanction isn't worth throwing one's soverigin ambitions , Wouldn't be the first time either

US Sanctioned India's domestic Nuclear program post 1974....Did we stop building nuclear power plants ....No we just switched partners from Canadian to Russians

US Sanctioned India's Space Tech post 1998 ..Did we stop building rockets and cryogenic engines ? ...No we just decided to build our own instead of importing from Russia

The US always does what benefits it the most and pissing off one of its partners in the indo-pacific Axis and losing out on Billions of $ of future FMS sales is not exactly in its best interest


CAATSA or not ...The S400 is coming
 

HalfMoon

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Pro US Author writes pro US article ...Wow what a shocker

For every Swamy who says to dump Russia and embrace SU there are several who claim the opposite , several who in the US FP community who say US will sanction India , several who say it won't ... Taking one of them as gospel and ignoring the others would be sheer stupidity .


The S400 is going happening 100%, There are already teams in Russia that have started training for the platform . https://www.hindustantimes.com/indi...-400-air-defence-systems-101611052111424.html

If Biden and Kopmala do feel the need for CAATSA then we'd rather take CAATSA than cancel the deal , A momentary sanction isn't worth throwing one's soverigin ambitions , Wouldn't be the first time either

US Sanctioned India's domestic Nuclear program post 1974....Did we stop building nuclear power plants ....No we just switched partners from Canadian to Russians

US Sanctioned India's Space Tech post 1998 ..Did we stop building rockets and cryogenic engines ? ...No we just decided to build our own instead of importing from Russia

The US always does what benefits it the most and pissing off one of its partners in the indo-pacific Axis and losing out on Billions of $ of future FMS sales is not exactly in its best interest


CAATSA or not ...The S400 is coming
Congress is pro-Russia while BJP is pro-US.

Modi will listen to Swamy and dump S-400.
 

Turingsage

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RUSSIA NOT A FRIEND ????????????





  • India’s “Energy Diplomacy” With Russia Will Reap Strategic Dividends

vladimir putin embraces narendra modi during a session at spief in 2017 photo afp

Vladimir Putin embraces Narendra Modi during a session at SPIEF in 2017. PHOTO: AFP
India’s “energy diplomacy” with Russia will reap strategic dividends
It must be cautioned, however, that this scenario would risk complicating India’s recent rapprochement with China
Andrew Korybko March 03, 2021
The opening of the “Indian Energy Centre” in Moscow on Tuesday will reap strategic dividends for both sides. One of the world’s largest energy importers is showing its keen interest in expanding cooperation with one of the world’s largest energy exporters. It’s a perfect match between natural partners, but there’s more to it than just business. This development represents the long-overdue decision by New Delhi to more eagerly engage in “energy diplomacy” with Moscow, which will assist the recalibration of both of their delicate “balancing” acts between Great Powers, especially China. India simultaneously wants to reduce its dependence on West Asian energy imports in parallel with expanding its strategic presence in the Russia’s Far East and Arctic regions, while Moscow wants to reduce its growing dependence on Chinese energy exports in parallel with “balancing” Beijing’s strategic presence in those two aforementioned regions as well.
The Times Of India reported more about how this development came to be. An anonymous senior diplomatic source informed the outlet that the idea originated during Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s attendance at Russia’s Eastern Economic Forum in Vladivostok in September 2019 as President Putin’s guest of honour, during which time they agreed to establish what’s described as the “Far Eastern Energy Corridor” to complement the proposed Vladivostok-Chennai Maritime Corridor (VCMC). On the topic of the VCMC, India’s Shipping Minister told Russia’s publicly financed international media outlet Sputnik in an exclusive interview earlier this week that it should be operational soon. As can be seen, all the pieces are quickly falling into place, which is evidenced by the opening of the Indian Energy Centre and recent reports that they plan to jointly cooperate in the economically dynamic ASEAN region that’s strategically positioned in the middle of their proposed corridor.
These developments represent the rapid progress that’s being made on India’s plans to bring Russia into the Indo-Pacific, just like I wrote about last month in my earlier article for The Express Tribune about the purpose of Indian Foreign Secretary Shringla’s visit to Moscow at the time. In my respectful response to Professor John Mearsheimer’s hour-long interview with Pakistani journalist Ejaz Haidar that same week, I explained “Why Structural Realists Are Wrong To Predict That Russia Will Help The US Against China” but clarified that Moscow is already actively seeking to “balance” Beijing through the Eurasian Great Power’s comprehensive improvement of strategic relations with New Delhi. India’s “energy diplomacy” with Russia is a “friendly” way to accomplish this shared goal since it reduces the risk of China viewing their recently enhanced cooperation through a security perspective and thus inadvertently provoking a mutually disadvantageous security dilemma.
If the VCMC’s Far Eastern Energy Corridor is successfully established, and there’s no credible reason to doubt that it will be, then India will eventually become a more strategic player in Russia’s Far East and Arctic regions, the route to which passes through the South China and East China Seas. Although Russia seems to envision that only energy tankers and commercial vessels will regularly transit through these bodies of water instead of warships, there’s a chance that India will seek to exploit this dynamic for the purpose of dispatching its navy there from time to time to either escort these ships for prestige’s sake and/or participate in US-led so-called “freedom of navigation operations” (FONOP) under the pretext of ensuring “energy security”. That could create security concerns for China, especially if this becomes increasingly commonplace in the coming future. To be clear, Russia wouldn’t intend for this outcome to materialise, but India might exploit the situation regardless.
It must be cautioned, however, that this scenario would risk complicating India’s recent rapprochement with China following their synchronised disengagement along the Line of Actual Control (LAC), as well as possibly create challenges for Russia’s very delicate “balancing” act between them both. India might be tempted by some of the Modi Administration’s anti-Chinese hawks to push the envelope under the cover of “plausible deniability”, hoping that China wouldn’t publicly protest FONOPs through the South China and East China Seas along the VCMC’s Far Eastern Energy Corridor out of fear of rattling Russia, but Beijing adamantly opposes all violations of its territorial sovereignty regardless of the pretext. It might not publicly share its concerns since the Chinese arguably prefer handling sensitive issues behind the scenes if possible, but there’s little doubt that it’ll somehow or other convey its displeasure if India engages in such a provocation.
With this in mind, it’s strongly suggested that India resists the temptation to exploit the VCMC’s Far Eastern Energy Corridor as a pretext to increase its military presence in the South China and East China Seas. Russia would do well to politely resist any Indian moves in this direction by making New Delhi aware that such a reckless decision would endanger the viability of their complementary “balancing” acts vis-a-vis their fellow BRICS and SCO Chinese partner. Under no circumstances must the VCMC have any military dimension associated with it otherwise this initiative’s strategic dividends will transform into strategic risks. In and of itself, commercial and energy cooperation along this route are “friendly” ways for Russia and India to “balance” China’s influence in the Far East and Arctic regions, but the moment that this takes on a military purpose per what in that case would likely be India’s unilateral decision in this respect is the moment that this policy fails.

Express Tribune
 

HalfMoon

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RUSSIA NOT A FRIEND ????????????





  • India’s “Energy Diplomacy” With Russia Will Reap Strategic Dividends

vladimir putin embraces narendra modi during a session at spief in 2017 photo afp

Vladimir Putin embraces Narendra Modi during a session at SPIEF in 2017. PHOTO: AFP
India’s “energy diplomacy” with Russia will reap strategic dividends
It must be cautioned, however, that this scenario would risk complicating India’s recent rapprochement with China
Andrew Korybko March 03, 2021
The opening of the “Indian Energy Centre” in Moscow on Tuesday will reap strategic dividends for both sides. One of the world’s largest energy importers is showing its keen interest in expanding cooperation with one of the world’s largest energy exporters. It’s a perfect match between natural partners, but there’s more to it than just business. This development represents the long-overdue decision by New Delhi to more eagerly engage in “energy diplomacy” with Moscow, which will assist the recalibration of both of their delicate “balancing” acts between Great Powers, especially China. India simultaneously wants to reduce its dependence on West Asian energy imports in parallel with expanding its strategic presence in the Russia’s Far East and Arctic regions, while Moscow wants to reduce its growing dependence on Chinese energy exports in parallel with “balancing” Beijing’s strategic presence in those two aforementioned regions as well.
The Times Of India reported more about how this development came to be. An anonymous senior diplomatic source informed the outlet that the idea originated during Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s attendance at Russia’s Eastern Economic Forum in Vladivostok in September 2019 as President Putin’s guest of honour, during which time they agreed to establish what’s described as the “Far Eastern Energy Corridor” to complement the proposed Vladivostok-Chennai Maritime Corridor (VCMC). On the topic of the VCMC, India’s Shipping Minister told Russia’s publicly financed international media outlet Sputnik in an exclusive interview earlier this week that it should be operational soon. As can be seen, all the pieces are quickly falling into place, which is evidenced by the opening of the Indian Energy Centre and recent reports that they plan to jointly cooperate in the economically dynamic ASEAN region that’s strategically positioned in the middle of their proposed corridor.
These developments represent the rapid progress that’s being made on India’s plans to bring Russia into the Indo-Pacific, just like I wrote about last month in my earlier article for The Express Tribune about the purpose of Indian Foreign Secretary Shringla’s visit to Moscow at the time. In my respectful response to Professor John Mearsheimer’s hour-long interview with Pakistani journalist Ejaz Haidar that same week, I explained “Why Structural Realists Are Wrong To Predict That Russia Will Help The US Against China” but clarified that Moscow is already actively seeking to “balance” Beijing through the Eurasian Great Power’s comprehensive improvement of strategic relations with New Delhi. India’s “energy diplomacy” with Russia is a “friendly” way to accomplish this shared goal since it reduces the risk of China viewing their recently enhanced cooperation through a security perspective and thus inadvertently provoking a mutually disadvantageous security dilemma.
If the VCMC’s Far Eastern Energy Corridor is successfully established, and there’s no credible reason to doubt that it will be, then India will eventually become a more strategic player in Russia’s Far East and Arctic regions, the route to which passes through the South China and East China Seas. Although Russia seems to envision that only energy tankers and commercial vessels will regularly transit through these bodies of water instead of warships, there’s a chance that India will seek to exploit this dynamic for the purpose of dispatching its navy there from time to time to either escort these ships for prestige’s sake and/or participate in US-led so-called “freedom of navigation operations” (FONOP) under the pretext of ensuring “energy security”. That could create security concerns for China, especially if this becomes increasingly commonplace in the coming future. To be clear, Russia wouldn’t intend for this outcome to materialise, but India might exploit the situation regardless.
It must be cautioned, however, that this scenario would risk complicating India’s recent rapprochement with China following their synchronised disengagement along the Line of Actual Control (LAC), as well as possibly create challenges for Russia’s very delicate “balancing” act between them both. India might be tempted by some of the Modi Administration’s anti-Chinese hawks to push the envelope under the cover of “plausible deniability”, hoping that China wouldn’t publicly protest FONOPs through the South China and East China Seas along the VCMC’s Far Eastern Energy Corridor out of fear of rattling Russia, but Beijing adamantly opposes all violations of its territorial sovereignty regardless of the pretext. It might not publicly share its concerns since the Chinese arguably prefer handling sensitive issues behind the scenes if possible, but there’s little doubt that it’ll somehow or other convey its displeasure if India engages in such a provocation.
With this in mind, it’s strongly suggested that India resists the temptation to exploit the VCMC’s Far Eastern Energy Corridor as a pretext to increase its military presence in the South China and East China Seas. Russia would do well to politely resist any Indian moves in this direction by making New Delhi aware that such a reckless decision would endanger the viability of their complementary “balancing” acts vis-a-vis their fellow BRICS and SCO Chinese partner. Under no circumstances must the VCMC have any military dimension associated with it otherwise this initiative’s strategic dividends will transform into strategic risks. In and of itself, commercial and energy cooperation along this route are “friendly” ways for Russia and India to “balance” China’s influence in the Far East and Arctic regions, but the moment that this takes on a military purpose per what in that case would likely be India’s unilateral decision in this respect is the moment that this policy fails.

Express Tribune
Russia may see India as a friend but India does not see Russia as a friend.
 

Hephaestus

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LOL

NO

Putin cancels India summit. First time in 20 years.

Biden has put Modi on notice. Drop S-400 or prepare to get sanctioned.

Modi has no option but to bow to Biden-Kamala.
And and you are a senior member :rofl: :rofl:
 

Hephaestus

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What I said is well documented.

Putin was supposed to land in India in Oct-2020 but cancelled the summit.

Biden-Kamala have warned Modi not to go ahead with S-400 deal. The deal with be cancelled as Modi does not have any other choice.
See he is backing out already.
Biden-Kamala have warned Modi? Laal topi news watchers. 5th generation warfare now :rofl::rofl:

I am willing to wager some €'s too. S400 will happen. So will som fighters from US.
Congress is pro-Russia while BJP is pro-US.

Modi will listen to Swamy and dump S-400.
I am now sure you get all your news from 2-bit self boasting arms adviser channels on youtube. 100% sure.
 
Last edited:

akshay gehlot

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Congress is pro-Russia while BJP is pro-US.
Wow such expert and in depth analysis... You should really open a think-tank .

Although you might not find anyone willing to take you seriously when you spout thoughts like "congress is pro Russia " .

This is 2021 , Not 1971 , Congress under Rahul is firmly alligned with the US Democratic Party to the extent that Rahul is now getting coached and helped in campaigning by Obama's old aides , The "progressive " left of the states HATES BJP and would like nothing more than to go back to Obama-Manmohan era relations .

Go have a look at the people Biden has been choosing for his South Asia desks and policy , All pro Congress old money people who hate Modi's guts , India may have been close to Repubs but they're no longer in power and are going through a crises themselves ... So no the current Indian Govt and the current American government are not close .


Anyway its March now and soldiers are already training on S400 in Russia , By November the batteries will be in India , So by when exactly do you expect this mega deal to be canceled ?

Let me know because i'll set a reminder and come back to this thread to laugh at you
 

HalfMoon

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Wow such expert and in depth analysis... You should really open a think-tank .

Although you might not find anyone willing to take you seriously when you spout thoughts like "congress is pro Russia " .

This is 2021 , Not 1971 , Congress under Rahul is firmly alligned with the US Democratic Party to the extent that Rahul is now getting coached and helped in campaigning by Obama's old aides , The "progressive " left of the states HATES BJP and would like nothing more than to go back to Obama-Manmohan era relations .

Go have a look at the people Biden has been choosing for his South Asia desks and policy , All pro Congress old money people who hate Modi's guts , India may have been close to Repubs but they're no longer in power and are going through a crises themselves ... So no the current Indian Govt and the current American government are not close .


Anyway its March now and soldiers are already training on S400 in Russia , By November the batteries will be in India , So by when exactly do you expect this mega deal to be canceled ?

Let me know because i'll set a reminder and come back to this thread to laugh at you

S-400 will follow FGFA deal.

India paid for FGFA before cancelling it.

S-400 will be the same.
 

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