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US-Pak negotiations on nuclear cooperation?

RajeHind

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I heard that iran is among top 20 electricity producers and they are willing to sell the electricity to pakistan then why not pakistan go for it, it will serve the purpose till it arranges some other sources like nuclear energy etc...and also i think there is no civilian nuclear reactors in pakistan, all are under military control,not for electricity production, correct me if i m wrong
 

DaRk WaVe

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No N-deal with Pakistan yet: US

AMID reports of a possible civil nuclear deal between US and Pakistan, the American Embassy in Pakistan has said that there are no negotiations on for such an agreement yet.
Talking to NDTV, a spokesman for the US Embassy in Islamabad said: “The US has not entered negotiations on a civil nuclear agreement with Pakistan. The United States is committed to helping Pakistan address its real and growing energy needs, and we look forward to cooperating with Pakistan in ways that are compatible with Pakistan’s economic, environmental and security needs and with US international commitments and policies.”
Earlier, the words of Anne W Patterson, US Ambassador to Pakistan, suggested a change of heart on the part of Washington, which has so far kept rebuffing Pakistan’s request for a nuclear deal. Patterson said in an interview to a US-based Pakistani newspaper: “We are beginning to have a discussion with the Pakistan Government” on the country’s desire to tap nuclear energy.
She said these would be “working level talks” on the issue in Washington this month. “Earlier on, non-proliferation concerns were quite severe. I think we are beginning to pass those and this is a scenario that we are going to explore...,” Patterson said.
Reacting cautiously to the possibility of a deal between the US and Pakistan, Indian External Affairs Minister SM Krishna said: “America needs to take a holistic view on the US-Pak nuclear deal...The US should consider Pakistan’s track record before any deal.”

No N-deal with Pakistan yet: US | Pakistan | News | Newspaper | Daily | English | Online
 

Zaki

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I don't know why i have feeling that we are going to get something this time. If not big then at least 2x 700MW or 1x 1000MW plant somewhere in Karachi (as proposed) and in return Americans might not want us to buy electricity from Iran and ask us to "Do More" like always in WoT and probably some kind of sanctions in Nuclear sector
 

DaRk WaVe

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but we have another problem in our Nuclear power plants.......... we not just want US to build for us but we want them to fund it also :lol:

No Money :lol:
if we ever arranged money we all know about something called, 'kickbacks' :D
 

xebex

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'kickbacks' :D
'kickbacks' can be from either side:whistle:

I don't know why i have feeling that we are going to get something this time. If not big then at least 2x 700MW or 1x 1000MW plant somewhere in Karachi (as proposed) and in return Americans might not want us to buy electricity from Iran and ask us to "Do More" like always in WoT and probably some kind of sanctions in Nuclear sector
Zaki, I think all these has something to do with Iran gas pipeline. Probably a sophisticated diplomatic maneuver.
 
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New Recruit

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Pakistan has only 18 dams....(wiki)

Instead of playing power game with India if Pakistan built more reservoirs and dams then not only it will solve the problem of water but also the problem of electricity...

Current economic situation suggest that Pakistan cannot afford the nuclear plant(development and maintenance) which means its just a power play or they want the uranium for there nuclear weapon which they rapidly increasing in few years.....

Its not necessary what India do Pakistan has to do that...

Pakistan's energy requirement in coming 10 years is 32000MW-35000MW where as India's is up-to 400000 MW.

Pakistan should concentrate more in its economy then some stupid game.
 

Zaki

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I heard that iran is among top 20 electricity producers and they are willing to sell the electricity to pakistan then why not pakistan go for it, it will serve the purpose till it arranges some other sources like nuclear energy etc...
Yes Iran is the World's 19th biggest Electricity producer. It is exporting electricity to Turkey, Afghanistan and Gwadar, Pakistan.

and also i think there is no civilian nuclear reactors in pakistan, all are under military control,not for electricity production, correct me if i m wrong
No thats wrong

There are 2 operational civilian Nuclear reactors in Pakistan. 1 in Karachi and 1 in Chashma and 1 Nuclear reactor is under construction in Chashma and due to be operational this year. There are 2 more approved projects in Chashma and the construction work expected to start soon
 

DaRk WaVe

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Pakistan pushes US for nuclear technology deal

Pakistan wants the US to provide it with nuclear technology for a civilian energy programme and is to push the Obama administration this week for a deal.

Islamabad seeks a civilian nuclear deal to mirror the package granted to India by George Bush, a proposal that would prove contentious in Washington, given Pakistan's uneven record on combating extremist groups and its sale of nuclear technology to states hostile to the west, led by the former head of its programme, Dr Abdul Qadeer Khan.

A spokesman for Pakistan's ministry of foreign affairs, Abdul Basit, said today: "Pakistan is an energy-deficit country and we're looking for all sources, including nuclear, to meeting our requirements."

A team led by Pakistan's foreign minister that includes the country's army commander and spy chief is due to arrive in Washington on Wednesday for meetings with their US counterparts, including Hillary Clinton, the secretary of state, in an effort to relaunch dialogue between the two allies. Afghanistan and help for Pakistan's near-bankrupt economy will also be on the agenda.

Many experts believe Pakistan holds the key to stabilising Afghanistan and it is trying to position itself as a sole conduit to talk to the Taliban.

The US meetings, are designed to restart talks that were last held in 2008.

Pakistan believes it has suffered from the violent fallout of US-led intervention in neighbouring Afghanistan and requires further assistance, despite a recent $7.5bn (£5bn) US aid injection.

A civilian nuclear deal, which would provide technology and fuel for power plants, could be the carrot required for Pakistan to finally cut its ties to jihad groups. A variety of incentives since 2001, including military equipment and civilian aid, have not worked, say experts.

Christine Fair, an assistant professor at Georgetown University in Washington, said: "We need a big idea for Pakistan, to transform it from a source of insecurity for the region to a country committed to eliminating terrorism and ensuring that nuclear proliferation doesn't happen again.

"We're trying to get Pakistan to do things that are in our strategic interests but not in theirs."

Pakistan craves a nuclear deal because it aspires to parity with India, say analysts.

It bristles with indignation over the perceived special treatment accorded to India, which it believes has upset the regional balance of power in South Asia.

Prof Shaun Gregory, director of the Pakistan security research unit at Bradford University, said: "Through the deal, India became a de facto member of the nuclear club and Pakistan doesn't understand why it wasn't offered the same thing. Pakistan has to position itself as an equal to India."

While Pakistan and India used to be bracketed together, Pakistan is now lumped in with Afghanistan under "******", a diplomatic relegation, while India is lauded as a growing power.

Pakistan's past record of nuclear proliferation hangs over it, especially as its renegade scientist, Abdul Qadeer Khan, continues to make revelations about his secret arms sales. Khan was placed under house arrest in 2004 but has since been released.

David Albright, a former UN weapons inspector who is president of Institute for Science and International Security, an independent thinktank in Washington, said: "Pakistan has a chance (for a civil nuclear deal) but it has to overcome some pretty serious roads. If there was a trial of AQ Khan and he was jailed, that would help."(I see so that wasn't a coincidence)

A US-Pakistan deal could take several years to hammer out. The US-India agreement has not been not finalised, more than five years after negotiations began.

Pakistan pushes US for nuclear technology deal | World news | guardian.co.uk
 

Zaki

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'kickbacks' can be from either side:whistle:



Zaki, I think all these has something to do with Iran gas pipeline. Probably a sophisticated diplomatic maneuver.
yeah Americans wants to isolate Iran anyhow. But we can't step back in our Iran Pakistan deal now. All we can do is if we Americans are willing to provide us something useful to fullfill our energy requirements and that too in affordable money..... we might step back in buying electricity from Iran.

Iran is coming closer to Pakistan and west does not want that.... and i am very optimistic either way....... its good for Pakistan
 

xebex

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Nuke deal may tangle South Asian security

BEIJING - Indications by the US that it was open to Islamabad's plea for a civilian nuclear deal akin to the US-India agreement would further complicate the security situation in South Asia, experts told China Daily on Monday.

The Times of India newspaper reported on Monday a possible policy shift by the US, which has until now rejected Pakistan's entreaties for a nuclear deal.


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Acknowledging that earlier US "non-proliferation concerns were quite severe", the US ambassador to Islamabad, Anne Patterson, told a Los Angeles-based Pakistani journal that attitudes in Washington were changing now.

She said the two sides were going to have "working level talks" on the subject during a strategic dialogue on March 24.

"I think we are beginning to pass those and this is a scenario that we are going to explore," she is reported to have said.

Pakistan and the US are set to hold their first high-level strategic dialogue this week in Washington, co-chaired by US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Pakistan's foreign minister, Shah Mehmood Qureshi.

The dialogue, however, is unlikely to result in any substantive progress on the nuclear deal between the two sides, and the deal would only undermine the relations between the US and India, pushing India to seek more cooperation from Russia, said Hu Shisheng, a scholar of South Asia studies at the China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations.

India's landmark civilian nuclear deal with the US in 2005, which ended the isolation it had experienced since testing an atomic device in 1974, created a major exception to the US prohibition of nuclear assistance to any country that did not accept international monitoring of all its nuclear facilities.

Hu said there were still two key hurdles in the nuclear cooperation between the US and India - the US has refused to transfer nuclear technology to India and has not given India the right to reprocess nuclear waste.

"If the US makes another exception for Pakistan, India will be irritated, and that will likely derail the US-India relationship," Hu said. "India then is likely to turn to Russia for more (assistance), which the US doesn't want to see (happen)."

Russia announced it would build 16 nuclear reactors in India as part of defense and energy deals when Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin visited India this month, competing with French and US firms for contracts to build nuclear power plants in Asia's third-largest economy.

"For the US, the only consideration when it offered the possibility of a civil nuclear pact with Pakistan may have been as a bargain for more support (from Pakistan) for its anti-terror effort," Hu said.

Washington calls Pakistan's semi-autonomous tribal belt the global headquarters of Al-Qaida and the most dangerous region on Earth, where Islamist militants are fuelling the war in Afghanistan, now into its ninth year.

"But the US won't easily trust Pakistan's internal security apparatus," Hu said, referring to recent bombings. "Who knows, the nuclear reactors may be threatened?"

If a civil nuclear pact is reached between Pakistan and the US, China would face a little less pressure in responding to Pakistan's requests for nuclear cooperation, he said.

"As far as the likely US-Pakistan nuclear pact is concerned, it could be an option for China to play the role of Russia, which has benefited from the US-India nuclear pact, " Hu said.

Russia is already building two reactors in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, and has said that six of the reactors would be built by 2017.

Yet, there will be more problems as far as the security situation in South Asia is concerned, he said.

China-Pakistan ties have been a big concern for India. "Where will China-India relations go if China cooperates with Pakistan in civil nuclear deals?" Hu pointed out.

"The situation is already complicated in South Asia. The US-Pakistan (likely) pact will only introduce more complexities," Hu said.

Arif Rafiq, the president of Vizier Consulting, which provides strategic guidance on Middle East and South Asian political and security issues, told Radio Australia that Pakistan is expecting a lot when it comes to the civil nuclear deal and won't achieve much breakthrough (on the matter) in discussions with the US.

"It is going to be really difficult for the Pakistanis to attain some sort of progress in that in a span of two days. You need congressional approval, (and) you have to go through the IAEA's central board for approval," Rafiq is reported to have said.

Nuke deal may tangle South Asian security
 

DaRk WaVe

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Qureshi & Kayani meet key US officials




WASHINGTON: The United States and Pakistan engaged in preparatory talks on Monday, ahead of a strategic dialogue which US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says will forge even closer ties between the two allies.

Meanwhile, Chief of the Army Staff Gen Ashfaq Kayani concluded his consultations with senior American military commanders in Florida on Monday morning and went straight to the Pentagon for talks with US Secretary of Defence Robert Gates.

General Kayani will also attend the opening ceremony of the talks between Secretary Clinton and Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi at the State Department on Wednesday.

“What we are interested in is looking at the long-term in the relationship between the US and Pakistan,” Mr Gates told journalists before his meeting with Gen Kayani.

“How we can strengthen our relationship and how we can help Pakistan in dealing with the security challenges that face them but also face us and Nato as well.”

Mr Gates said that the US-Pakistan strategic dialogue, which begins on Wednesday, will enable the two sides to talk about the full range of their relationship.

In a message on the Pakistan Day, Secretary Clinton noted that the broad partnership between the US and Pakistan was based on “mutual respect and mutual interest” and the first ministerial-level strategic dialogue in Washington would be an “opportunity to forge even closer ties between our nations”.

The US, she said, was already supporting Pakistan’s efforts to strengthen “democratic institutions, foster economic development, expand opportunity, and defeat the extremist groups who threaten Pakistan, the region, and even our own country.

Also on Monday, Foreign Minister Qureshi, who heads the Pakistani delegation to the dialogue, met US special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan Richard Holbrooke.

The two reviewed the agenda for the dialogue and noted that both sides had a strong desire to further strengthen their relationship.

But The New York Times reported on Monday that a strong military presence in the talks indicated that Gen Kayani “will be the dominant Pakistani participant in important meetings in Washington this week”.

The US media also reported that just 48 hours before the dialogue, the Pakistani government filed a petition in a High Court seeking to investigate Dr A. Q. Khan over recent reports about his ties to Iran’s nuclear programme.

The move follows indications from Washington that it is open to discussions with Pakistan on the nuclear energy front at the strategic dialogue.

Quoting recent statements by senior US officials, the media reported that the talks were expected to help define the relationship between the United States and Pakistan as the war against the Taliban reached its endgame phase in Afghanistan.

DAWN.COM | Front Page | Qureshi & Kayani meet key US officials
 
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Awesome

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surely, it would be best if we could come up with something of our OWN, but it takes time to get things in place. we definitely needs to plan to overcome this crisis and build our plants, but all of this can't be done within an year. surely it would take some time, so for the time being, I see Iran's deal the best.

I agree that Kalabagh would have been such a success, but it's not working (due to whatever reasons) we must look at alternatives.
I sincerely doubt that and I suspect the entire kahani is another attempt to sideline the military establishment.

Zardari's government has also started giving statement that they would reopen the AQ Khan case so that the US gives nuclear parity. Of course many members of the military would be implicated alongwith AQ Khan and Zardari will have a political strong arm over the military.
 

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