• Friday, October 20, 2017

US Navy Plans to Cut Cruisers by Half Amid Reports One Became Like a “Floating Prison”

Discussion in 'World Affairs' started by TaiShang, Oct 12, 2017.

  1. TaiShang

    TaiShang ELITE MEMBER

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    US Navy Plans to Cut Cruisers by Half Amid Reports One Became Like a “Floating Prison”

    Retiring the Ticonderogas could exacerbate the dangerously unhealthy stress on the service's other warships.

    BY JOSEPH TREVITHICK
    OCTOBER 11, 2017

    The U.S. Navy is reportedly planning to decommission half of its remaining Ticonderoga-class cruisers within a decade, just as reports have emerged that life aboard one of them, the USS Shiloh, had become like a "floating prison." The decision could only put additional strain on the service, which has already begun to suffer dangerously low readiness and morale, leading to a series of deadly accidents, in the face of high operational demands, difficulties in obtaining new ships, and crumbling shipyard infrastructure.

    On Oct. 9, 2017, Navy Times reported that the Navy would retire two Ticonderoga’s each year starting in 2020, with a total of 11 out of service by 2026. At present, the service has a total of 22 of the cruisers, the oldest of which, the USS Bunker Hill, joined the fleet in 1985. On the same day, the news outlet began to disclose horrifying details about life aboard another ship in the class, the USS Shiloh, in a series of articles based on official, internal command climate surveys it had obtained via the Freedom of Information Act.

    “I just pray we never have to shoot down a missile from North Korea,” on the Shiloh’s crew wrote. “Then our ineffectiveness will really show.”

    Part of the forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan’s accompanying Carrier Strike Group, itself part of the U.S. Seventh Fleet headquartered in Japan, the cruiser is tasked in part with the ballistic missile defense role, though the latest version of its primary interceptor, the SM-3 Block IIA, remains in testing. In addition, to the increasing threat of North Korea’s arsenal, which the sailor noted, China is fielding a increasing number of long-range ballistic missiles of various types, including one, the DF-21D, that it has designed specifically to take out aircraft carriers and other large ships at sea. Ballistics missiles are quickly proliferating around the world in general, too, with 2017 having already seen other tests in Iran, Israel, and South Korea among other locales.

    [​IMG]
    USN
    The Ticonderoga-class USS Cowpens fires a SM-2 missile during an exercise in 2012.

    Displacing close to 10,000 tons with a full load, the Shiloh also performs a vital air defense role for the carrier group, with more than 120 vertical launch system (VLS) cells able to hold a variety of surface-to-air missiles, a long-range radar and associated Aegis combat system, and other weapon systems, sensors, and electronic warfare equipment. These include the Standard Missile-2 (SM-2), the increasingly capable RIM-174A, better known as the SM-6, and the RIM-162A Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile, four of which can be quad-packed into each cell. The VLS can also launch Tomahawk land attack cruise missiles for stand-off attacks against targets on land, making the ship even more versatile. Its helicopters also provide anti-submarine screening for the inner sanctum of the Carrier Strike Group.

    With unprecedented tensions on the Korean Peninsula and simmering disputes elsewhere in the Western Pacific, especially over freedom of navigation through the South China Sea, it’s terrifying to learn sailors called the Shiloh a “floating prison.” “It feels like a race to see which will break down first, the ship or it’s [sic] crew,” another member of the crew noted.

    The man at the center of many of the complaints was the ship’s commanding officer, U.S. Navy Captain Adam Aycock. The service told Navy Times that it was aware of the issues, but did not explain then why Aycock was allowed to finish out his more than two year stint as Shiloh’s commander.

    According to the survey’s the outlet obtained, around half of sailors had reported “a lot” of work-related stress in 2015, when U.S. Navy Captain Kurush Morris was in charge. More than 80 percent said this was the case under Aycock’s leadership.

    [​IMG]
    USN
    The USS Shiloh.

    Underscoring the toxic leadership was the captain’s reported use of a punishment of three days in the ship’s brig with only bread and water for meals, reminiscent of a long gone era of Navy operations. Aycock would subject sailors to this regimen for infractions as minor as showing up late to their duty posts or violating curfew while in port.

    “I do not wear my [USS Shiloh] ballcap at the [Navy Exchange store],” a sailor said in one of the surveys. “Even the taxi drivers on base know us for being the ‘USS Bread and Water.’”

    The reports could help explain, at least in part, a bizarre episode earlier in 2017 in which one of the cruiser sailors hid for days in the ship's engine room. Petty Officer 3rd Class Peter Mims faces a court martial after admitting he deliberately avoided search parties, leading the rest of the crew to believe he had fallen overboard, prompting a massive search and rescue operation.

    According to the surveys, things had gotten so bad for Mims and his shipmates that “even taxi drivers Know [sic] us by the ship who has the worst captain and people trying to commit suicide,” a sailor wrote in their comments. “I feel like I would be better off being a hobo in San diego [sic] than show up to work onboard [sic] USS Shiloh,” another said.

    [​IMG]
    USN
    Petty Officer 3rd Class Peter Mims.

    That the Navy allowed the situation on board the ship to continue after three surveys full of negative comments has only raised new and serious questions about the state of the ships assigned to the Seventh Fleet and whether the problems might be more widespread. It of course begs the questions about whether the service felt, right or wrong, that it had limited options in order to meet its operational demands.

    Unfortunately, the reports do appear to be well in line with a host of other emerging details about poor state of the Navy surface ships with its forward deployed command in Japan. This information has begun to emerge following a series of investigations into two deadly collisions earlier in 2017.

    In June 2017, a container ship rammed into the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer USS Fitzgerald off the coast of Japan, an accident that killed seven sailors. Then, in August 2017, the USS John McCain, another Arleigh Burke, collided with an oil tanker east of Singapore near the Strait of Malacca. Ten more sailors died.

    [​IMG]
    USN
    Damage to the hull of the USS John McCain after it collided with an oil tanker in August 2017.

    This followed a pair of accidents earlier in the year. The Ticonderoga-class USS Antietam – one of the ships Navy Times says will end up retired in 2021 – ran aground in Japan. Another one of the cruisers, the USS Lake Champlain, which the Navy expects to decommission in 2022, got into an accident with a South Korean fishing boat.

    The events surrounding Fitzgerald’s collision seemed so odd that it spawned a number of conspiracy theories. The John McCain’s accident, however, made it clear that there were larger institutional problems.

    What has become clear is that due to a confluence of factors, including budget cuts and caps and problems with large shipbuilding programs such as the Littoral Combat Ship, the Seventh Fleet, along with other Navy commands, has been overworking crews and under-manning ships, often sending them out on patrols despite expired certifications. At the same time, commanding officers appear to have been reluctant to voice concerns or criticisms for fear of punishment by their own superiors.

    At a hearing in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee in September 2017, Secretary of the Navy Richard Spencer and U.S. Navy Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John Richardson admitted that the service was only able to meet 40 percent of the total demand for surface warships. They acknowledged a broad problem and promised to fix it, including through independent studies.

    [​IMG]
    RON SACHS/CNP VIA AP
    U.S. Navy Chief of Naval Operations Admiral John Richardson testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee in September 2017.

    However, some members of Congress have questioned whether new research is either necessary or useful in turning the service around. Arizona’s Senator John McCain, a Navy veteran and whose father is the namesake of the destroyer at the center of the second deadly accident, had no problem dressing down Spencer and Richardson over the situation.

    “It doesn’t take a study or RAND or [the] Mayo [Clinic] when you are working people 100 hours a week, OK?” he said. “I don’t have to ask RAND. I think I know what 100 hours a week does to people over time. And that’s been standard procedure for a long time.”

    The initial reports of what happened aboard Fitzgerald in June 2017, which you can read about in detail here, are damning though, as are the first assessments of the McCain’s accident, which the Navy has described as “preventable.” The courage of sailors aboard each vessel seems to have been the only thing stopping both incidents from turning out even worse.

    But it’s not entirely clear what the Navy really has the ability to do in the near term that won’t further upset the ability of its surface fleet to perform its core functions. There have been steady punishments for senior leaders at the Seventh Fleet, including the dismissal of the command’s top officer, Admiral Scott Swift in August 2017. The service relieved McCain’s commanding, U.S. Navy Commander Alfredo Sanchez, and its second in command, Commander Jessie Sanchez, on Oct. 11, 2017.

    [​IMG]
    USN
    The USS Fitzgerald sits in dry dock in Japan in July 2017.

    Beyond that, there are major limits for how fast the Navy could reasonably expect to increase the total size of its fleet or the sailors to man those ships, even if there were no politics and budgets involved. Shipbuilding in general has a long lead time and requires significant upfront investments in infrastructure and skilled workers. Once the shipyards get going, it’s easier to sustain production and steadily reduce costs, but only as long as there is demand and adequate funding.

    The aforementioned Littoral Combat Ship program was supposed to be a solution to many of these problems, offering an affordable ship that a small crew could operate in various limited scenarios to free up larger surface ships, such as the Arleigh Burkes and Ticonderogas, and their crews, for higher intensity missions. That has since turned into a nightmare project that delivered perpetually under-performing ships that have been still too much for the intentionally skeletonized crews to handle effectively.

    Earlier in 2017, the Navy finally admitted it needed an entirely new and more capable frigate-type ship to meet its requirements. This was after it attempted to respond to criticism from legislators about its shipbuilding plans by hastily slipped another Littoral Combat Ship into the service’s budget request for the 2018 fiscal year after the proposal had already gone to Congress without any clear indication of how it planned to pay for the addition.

    This all calls into question the Navy’s ability to sustain the ships it has now, as well as the small number it already has in production. The goal of a 355-ship fleet seems especially dubious in this context. It’s prompted the service to look serious at reactivating a number of older ships, including the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk, and a number of Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigates. The latter plan would see the ships return to service with very limited capabilities. When it comes to keeping even the fleet it already has in an operational state, The War Zone’s own Tyler Rogoway recently took a look at the sorry state of the Navy's critical shipyards that keep many of its most advanced vessels running. The picture isn't pretty to say the least.

    [​IMG]
    USN
    The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan and its accompany strike group return to Japan from a patrol in November 2016.

    The Navy’s plans to at least mothball half of the Ticonderogas by 2026 is only likely to prompt more criticisms and questions from Congress about the service’s priorities. It is possible that it could put the older cruisers through a service life extension program to stabilize that part of the surface fleet, but again, the money for that work would have to come from somewhere. Whether or not American shipyards have the capacity to turn over the ships and get them back into action in a reasonable amount of time and in a cost-effective manner are separate, but equally important questions.

    There's already the possibility the Navy may simply decide to try and squeeze more life out of the Ticonderogas as is, without any significant overhauls or modernization programs. In June 2017, U.S. Navy Vice Admiral Tom Moore, head of Naval Sea Systems Command, suggested that it might be possible to extend the service life of steel-hulled ships another five or 10 years with just routine maintenance. Though many of the same budgetary concerns would apply to such a plan, the Navy has at least requested additional funds for these kinds of basic repairs as part of Pentagon-wide push to improve overall readiness across the U.S. military in the budget request for the 2018 fiscal year.

    What is clear is that the Navy is rapidly reaching its breaking point and people have already died. Sailors’ comments about their time aboard Shiloh appear extreme in nature, but hardly detached from larger, service-wide issues. It’s a dangerous cycle to be in as well, since pressure to make do with less puts strain on personnel who are then more inclined to leave as soon as they’re able, further reducing to total available manpower, and so on and so forth.

    “It’s only a matter of time before something horrible happens,” one sailor aboard the cruiser wrote. “It’s a place we despise going to and cannot wait to leave,” another declared.

    Now that horrible things have happened, it’s clearly well past time for the Navy to do some serious soul searching about how to move forward and change the service’s operational climate once and for all.

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zon...mid-reports-one-became-like-a-floating-prison

    @Martian2 , @Jlaw , @AndrewJin , @oprih , @samsara
     
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  2. samsara

    samsara FULL MEMBER

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    This Video About The Navy's Decaying Shipyards Makes Its 355 Ship Goal Seem Laughable - The Drive

    The Navy has continued to prioritize procurement over the ability to maintain the fleet it already has.

    By Tyler Rogoway - September 26, 2017

    US aging shipyard.jpg

    We have often talked about the Pentagon's chronic disinterest in taking care of and making ready for combat the weapons it already has before buying new and even more costly ones. This culture of prioritization of procurement of new hardware over the readiness and maintenance of hardware has improved somewhat under Defense Secretary Mattis, but it still remains a looming issue as the services say they don't have enough money to be ready for the wars of today and arm themselves for the wars of tomorrow.

    Fixation on arbitrary hardware goals can magnify this issue as procurement of weapon systems to meet those goals without even having a plan to support them once they are in inventory can lead to waste on a massive scale. Take the Navy's proposed 355 ship fleet. This goal, supposedly to be obtained in the coming decade or two, is what the Navy says it needs to meet its increasing mission demands around the globe. This sounds all well and good, but upon closer examination the goal seems to be more of a monolithic gimmick than a rational strategy as there are so many other factors to take into account when fielding a force to meet future demands than just volume of hulls and force mix. One of those factors is the capacity of the Navy's shipyards to handle such a fleet. Ships, especially highly complex ones, require massive amounts of maintenance to remain viable. Without that maintenance they turn into floating hulks, and the world's most expensive ones at that.

    According to the Government Accountability Office, the Navy's fleet dreams far outmatch their investments in the critical but unglamorous infrastructure needed to support them. The GAO has put out a fabulous and troubling video on the subject that is really a must watch:



    In detailing the realities of the Navy's decaying naval yards, the GAO also seems to be inadvertently underlining just how strangely out of touch the Navy is with the plausibility of its own banner strategic policy.

    Just a few highlights from the short video:
    • At one time the Navy had 13 shipyards, but now it has just four.
    • None of these facilities were built to sustain a modern Navy.
    • There is nearly a $5B maintenance backlog alone and this estimate is likely far less than the actual cost.
    • Uses old inadequate equipment on high-tech vessels.
    • Drydocks are on average 89 years old and are in poor condition.
    • Due to the lack of dry dock capacity, the Navy won't be able to perform a third of its scheduled aircraft carrier and submarine maintenance projects over the next two decades.
    • Rising sea levels pose a threat to old dry docks.
    • The Navy says it will take nearly two decades to address these issues, but GAO says it will take longer. By that time the fleet will have ballooned putting more pressure on these tired facilities.
    • As of now the Navy is only funding roughly half the cost just to keep up maintenance on their own naval shipyards.
    US Norfolk Naval Shipyard.jpg

    The GAO has issued a full report on this problem and it outlines far more than the video includes. From its highlights page:

    "Similarly, a Navy analysis shows that the average age of shipyard capital equipment now exceeds its expected useful life. Partly as a result of their poor condition, the shipyards have not been fully meeting the Navy’s operational needs. In fiscal years 2000 through 2016, inadequate facilities and equipment led to maintenance delays that contributed in part to more than 1,300 lost operational days—days when ships were unavailable for operations—for aircraft carriers and 12,500 lost operational days for submarines (see figure). The Navy estimates that it will be unable to conduct 73 of 218 maintenance periods over the next 23 fiscal years due to insufficient capacity and other deficiencies.

    Though the Navy has developed detailed plans for capital investment in facilities and equipment at the shipyards that attempt to prioritize their investment strategies, this approach does not fully address the shipyards’ challenges, in part because the plans are missing key elements. Missing elements include analytically-based goals and metrics, a full identification of the shipyards’ resource needs, regular management reviews of progress, and reporting on progress to key decision makers and Congress. For example, the Navy estimates that it will need at least $9.0 billion in capital investment over the next12 fiscal years, but this estimate does not account for all expected costs, such as those for planning and modernizing the shipyards’ utility infrastructure. Unless it adopts a comprehensive, results-oriented approach to addressing its capital investment needs, the Navy risks continued deterioration of its shipyards, hindering its ability to efficiently and effectively support Navy readiness over the long term."

    You can read the full report here (PDF, 63 pages), but suffice it to say this damning review puts the Navy's ability to sustain a 355 ship Navy in question, that is if it can actually procure one. As we have learned all too well, continued high-tempo operational rates and further deferred maintenance will only magnify the issue.

    The solution to the issue is creating a realistic direct investment structure for these facilities that targets long-term usability over short-term fixes. Without really tackling the problem the Navy can buy all the ships it wants but it won't be able to keep them operational, and this especially affects the US nuclear submarine and aircraft carrier fleets, both of which are set to grow in the near term and are absolutely critical to national security.

    The big questions that the report doesn't address are not only how did the Navy's shipyards even get to this state of decay, but how on earth did the Navy brass think they could sustain their 355 ship fleet without emergency investments into them? Was this just nearsighted incompetence or an attempt for a handout to the shipbuilding industry on a massive scale?

    Regardless, these facilities are an embarrassment. We expect to see this type of thing in Russia, not in facilities that are critical to supporting the world's most powerful and technologically advanced Navy. The Navy should be totally realistic about this issue and cut procurement if they have to in order to rapidly update these facilities to more modern and sustainable standards.

    Doing it piecemeal over decades is not the answer. Cut the LCS buy to one less ship a year to make it happen. That would be a far more logical and beneficial investment in the Navy's future.


    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zon...yards-makes-its-355-ships-goal-seem-laughable
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2017
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  3. Piotr

    Piotr FULL MEMBER

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    Why I am not suprised?
    US workers in US poultry industry were forced to wear diapers:
    Tyson Foods runs slave camp as workers are forced to wear diapers, denied bathroom breaks
    Sunday, May 15, 2016 by: Isabelle Z.

    (NaturalNews) A new Oxfam America report has revealed some deeply disturbing information about the working conditions for workers at Tyson Foods. The "No Relief: Denial of Bathroom Breaks in the Poultry Industry" report, exposes how workers are routinely denied bathroom breaks, and calls for the company to change its ways.

    The report was compiled after interviewing employees of Tyson Foods and other poultry producers such as Perdue Farms, Sanderson Farms and Pilgrim's Pride. In total, the companies that were assessed represent 60 percent of the country's poultry market. The researchers discovered that workers were often met with ridicule or even punishment after asking to take a toilet break.

    The situation is so dire that some workers said they had to urinate or defecate on themselves right where they stood, while others simply went without food and drink to avoid potentially losing their jobs over going to the bathroom. Many workers have even starting wearing diapers to work.

    The supervisors are allegedly under pressure to meet speed and production requirements on the processing line, leading them to make workers wait hours to use the bathroom for just a few minutes, or denying them bathroom breaks altogether. Some workers who were "lucky" enough to be given permission to use the bathroom report being given a mere ten minutes to leave their post, remove their gear, make use of the facilities, put their gear back on, and then return back to their positions.

    Workers' health disregarded
    Besides the basic lack of dignity associated with wetting oneself or wearing diapers as an adult, "holding it in" can be uncomfortable and downright painful. Women in particular tend to suffer from the lack of bathroom breaks, as they need to contend with issues such as menstruation and pregnancy. In addition, not using the restroom when the need arises places them at a greater risk of suffering from infections.

    The report also sheds some light on another disturbing fact about Tyson chicken: "To add to the risk, studies show that poultry workers in many plants may absorb so many antibiotics from handling chicken flesh that they build a resistance to antibiotics, which can make it difficult to treat infections."

    One worker at an Alabama plant said that supervisors regularly granted permission with a caveat: "Go to the bathroom, and from there, go to Human Resources."

    Denying workers bathroom breaks is a violation of workplace safety laws, and could even be considered a violation of anti-discrimination laws. The firms in question have been quick to issue denials, with Tyson saying the company does "not tolerate the refusal of requests to use the restroom."

    According to Oxfam America, 250,000 American poultry workers suffer from high rates of illness and injury, low compensation, and a generally unpleasant and fear-inducing work climate.

    Tyson Foods can't seem to stay out of trouble
    If you think they treat their workers poorly, they don't treat their farmers much better. In his 2014 book The Meat Racket, author Christopher Leonard alleges that the farmers who provide meat to Tyson Foods are essentially locked into a type of contract farming that he likens to "indentured servitude," which is difficult to break free from.

    This is not the first time that Tyson has come under fire. A 2011 chemical accident at an Arkansas Tyson chicken processing plant, that sent 173 of its workers to the hospital, raised a lot of questions about the chemicals that were being used when processing their chicken. Tyson refused to identify the chemicals, but knowing that chicken is processed with chemicals that can cause such dangerous respiratory illnesses and even death when mixed, does not sit well with many consumers.

    As if all that wasn't enough to turn people off from supporting Tyson Foods, a 2014 report by the Environment America Research and Policy Center revealed that the firm can be blamed for the majority of the toxic waste that the food industry releases, accounting for more than 18 million pounds of waste dumped into waterways each year.

    The truth is, you simply don't know what the food you buy in stores contains, unless you have access to a food testing lab like Mike Adams, the Health Ranger does. His book Food Forensics sheds light on many of the common foods people buy, in order to help consumers make informed decisions.

    People who purchase their chicken from Tyson Foods or the restaurants it supplies are supporting these poor working conditions, not to mention putting their health at risk. Those who wish to eat chicken should seek sources that raise animals humanely on pasture-based, organic farms, and that do not process their meat with chemicals such as ammonia and chlorine.
    Source: https://www.naturalnews.com/054029_Tyson_Foods_bathroom_breaks_worker_diapers.html
     
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  4. rambro

    rambro FULL MEMBER

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    Good new for China then.
     
  5. TaiShang

    TaiShang ELITE MEMBER

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    This is what happens when militarist ambitions out-pace economic realities.

    China needs to continue to stay low and let the US continue to burn itself from within.

    The worst type of collapse is the one caused by internal weakness even without external intervention.
     
  6. samsara

    samsara FULL MEMBER

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    To Avoid Future Collisions, U.S. Navy Ships Will Advertise Their Locations in High-Traffic Areas

    The effort should help cut the risk of collisions at sea, but only addresses half the problem.

    By Kyle Mizokami - Sep 20, 2017

    U.S. Navy warships will now sail through high traffic areas with transponders that advertise the vessel's position in real time. The gesture should help other ships recognize when an American naval vessel is operating nearby—but it will do little to help those same naval vessels detect and avoid other ships.

    You can probably guess why the Navy is taking the step of requiring all warships to activate their Automatic Identification System (AIS) when sailing in areas with high ship traffic, such as the South China Sea or off the coast of Japan. Two U.S. Navy destroyers, the USS Fitzgerald and USS McCain have collided with merchant vessels this year. While both collisions are still under investigation, it seems pretty clear that in both instances one or both vessels involved was not aware a collision was imminent.

    The AIS system is a global system designed to help mariners locate and identify ship traffic in their vicinity. AIS sends a ship's location, speed, and navigational status via VHF maritime transmitter every two to ten seconds. That information is freely shared around the world, including on the Internet. The system is designed to help avoid collisions, aid in search and rescue operations, and keep track of fishing fleets.

    The U.S. Coast Guard requires most commercial vessels operating in American territorial waters to use AIS. The data can also be used to investigate incidents. For example, here's the data from the ACX Crystal, which collided with the USS Fitzgerald, showing the ship's movements before and after the accident:

    U.S. Navy vessels are outfitted with AIS but were not required to use it. Making matters a little more difficult is that the Arleigh Burke-class of destroyers, which includes the Fitzgerald and McCain, were the first American warships designed with reduced radar signatures, making them appear smaller on nearby radars than they really are. While this is useful in wartime to avoid detection and targeting by enemy forces, it is potentially hazardous to civilian mariners in peacetime. Broadcasting the identity of Navy ships should make those sailing around them better informed of their presence.

    That said, broadcasting AIS data addresses only half of the problem. While civilian merchantmen may not have seen the Fitzgerald and McCain, it seems likely those onboard the destroyers didn't see the merchant ships, either. Navy vessels have better radars to detect other ships and are supposed to have watchstanders scanning the nearby seas for potential dangers. Why those recent accidents happened nonetheless is the subject of ongoing Navy probes.

    Could this location-sharing make Navy ships more vulnerable to attack? Knowing exactly where the U.S. Navy is operating at any one time would make it possible to attack individual ships. Anything is possible, but the AIS system will only be activated in high traffic areas, meaning it will provide an incomplete picture of the Navy at sea. It would also be turned off while operating in dangerous areas, such as the Red Sea, where U.S. Navy destroyers were recently targeted with anti-ship missiles. The decision to use AIS could also be reversed once the Navy has decided it has a handle on the situation.

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/military/navy-ships/news/a28290/us-navy-ships-high-traffic-areas/

    https://news.usni.org/2017/09/19/de...roadcast-warship-locations-high-traffic-areas
     
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  7. samsara

    samsara FULL MEMBER

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    Straight from the mouthpiece of one of the largest US think tanks:

    Heritage Foundation's 2018 Index of U.S. Military Strength

    Heritage Foundation's 2018 Index of U.S. Military Strength.png

    Executive Summary

    “The U.S. military is only marginally able to meet the demands of defending America’s vital national interests.”


    Oct 5, 2017 16 min read

    Heritage 2018 Index of U.S. Mil Strength - ExSummary - Part 1.png
    Heritage 2018 Index of U.S. Mil Strength - ExSummary - Part 2.png
    The Executive Summary | The Heritage Foundation - Oct 5, 2017:
    http://www.heritage.org/military-strength/executive-summary
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2017 at 8:45 AM
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  8. Awan68

    Awan68 FULL MEMBER

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    Dont get too excited, this is all part of the pre planed hue n cry the american establishment makes the media generate when they want massive incriments in their defence budgets...
     
  9. TaiShang

    TaiShang ELITE MEMBER

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    In fact, exciting.

    Increase in already mountainous defence budget leads to more legalized corruption, but not to qualitative improvement.

    Good move. Trade route safety is important for East Asia. US can help by trying its best not to hit slow moving floating objects.
     
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