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UK & Brexit News and Updates

Discussion in 'Europe & Russia' started by LA se Karachi, Nov 4, 2016.

  1. LA se Karachi

    LA se Karachi FULL MEMBER

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    ‘Brexit’ Will Require a Vote in Parliament, U.K. Court Rules

    By STEPHEN CASTLE and STEVEN ERLANGER NOV. 3, 2016


    LONDON — The British government’s plan for leaving the European Union was thrown into uncertainty on Thursday after the High Court ruled that Parliament must give its approval before the process can begin.

    The court’s decision seemed likely to slow — but not halt — the British withdrawal from the bloc, a step approved by nearly 52 percent of voters in a June referendum.

    Nevertheless, the court’s decision was a significant blow to Prime Minister Theresa May. She had planned to begin the legal steps for leaving the European Union by the end of March, and to prepare for the negotiations over Britain’s exit mostly behind closed doors.

    If the court’s ruling is upheld — the government immediately vowed to appeal — that plan would be thrown into disarray, analysts said.


    [​IMG]
    Prime Minister Theresa May had planned to begin the legal steps for leaving the European Union by the end of March, and to prepare for the negotiations over Britain’s exit mostly behind closed doors.
    Credit Kirsty Wigglesworth/Associated Press


    Mrs. May would be forced to work with Parliament and consider its competing priorities for Britain’s future. Specifically, she would have to give it a detailed strategy for negotiating the British departure, or “Brexit.” She has adamantly resisted doing so, arguing that this would impede her flexibility in the negotiations, preventing Britain from getting the best possible deal.


    Few observers believe that Parliament will go so far as to prevent a departure from the bloc. Lawmakers themselves voted overwhelmingly to hold the referendum and pledged to abide by the results.

    The more likely impact could be to weaken Mrs. May’s hold on the negotiating process. Her main priority has been controlling immigration and Britain’s borders, even if that hurts the economy by forcing her nation to leave the European Union’s single market — a “hard Brexit.”

    The court’s decision may ultimately force her to compromise, a prospect that led the pound to rise Thursday morning, lifting it from the multidecade lows it had been plumbing in recent weeks.

    But it was not immediately clear how the politics would play out. The Conservative government is already split over what kind of future relationship it wants with the European Union, and in general, members of Parliament were not in favor of leaving the bloc in the first place. The government hoped to get the talks started without a major parliamentary debate and potential interference, especially in the House of Lords, where the Conservatives do not have a clear majority.

    If Mrs. May should find parliamentary opposition intolerable, she might ultimately be tempted to seek an early general election to gain a wider mandate for leaving the bloc, some analysts said. Currently, her Conservative Party holds a slim majority, with 329 seats in the 650-seat Parliament, and many of those members opposed a withdrawal.

    The ruling unsettled the proponents of exiting the European Union, who warned against any backsliding. Nigel Farage, who resigned as leader of the nationalist U.K. Independence Party after the referendum, said he feared that Britain was heading for a “half Brexit,” and he said he would return to politics in 2019 if the country had not left the bloc by then.

    “I see M.P.s from all parties saying, ‘Oh well, actually we should stay part of the single market; we should continue with our daily financial contributions,’ ” he said in an interview on BBC Radio. “I think we could be at the beginning, with this ruling, of a process where there is a deliberate, willful attempt by our political class to betray 17.4 million voters.”

    On Thursday, the government said that an expedited appeal would be heard in December by the Supreme Court, Britain’s highest appellate body, and that it was sticking to its timetable for leaving the bloc for now. Yet in the growing environment of constitutional, legal and political uncertainty, the government’s strategy could easily be disrupted.

    The ruling was “a severe setback for Theresa May’s government,” said Mujtaba Rahman, managing director for Europe at the Eurasia Group, a political consulting firm. But he added that the government’s timetable could still be met if the Supreme Court rules in its favor.

    Although Parliament approved holding the referendum, Mrs. May’s critics argued in court that failing to give lawmakers a voice would turn them into bystanders as Britain negotiated its disengagement from the bloc. They also pointed out that, technically, the referendum is not legally binding.

    The case, brought by several plaintiffs, including Gina Miller, an investment fund manager, and Deir Dos Santos, a hairdresser, is a constitutional one, about the powers vested in the government, the crown and Parliament. The case is not about whether Britain will or will not leave the European Union, but about the procedure for invoking Article 50, the legal mechanism for leaving the bloc, which provides a two-year period for negotiations.

    The plaintiffs argued successfully that leaving the European Union involved the revocation of certain rights granted to Britons by Parliament, and that lawmakers must have a say and a vote before Article 50 is invoked.

    In his ruling, the lord chief justice, John Thomas, said that “the most fundamental rule of the U.K. Constitution is that Parliament is sovereign and can make or unmake any law it chooses.”

    Oddly enough, this was precisely the case made by those who wanted to end membership, who argued that only by leaving the European Union could Parliament’s sovereignty be completely restored. Now that same argument could delay the very exit so desired by those politicians and their supporters.

    The government argued that under residual powers of royal prerogative, which cover international treaty-making, it had the power to invoke Article 50 without a vote in Parliament.

    But the court found that invoking Article 50 would essentially repeal the European Communities Act, a 1972 law that allowed for the incorporation of European law into the British legal system, and that only Parliament had the power to do so.

    Tim Farron, leader of the Liberal Democrats, welcomed the ruling, adding that it was “disappointing that this government was so intent on undermining parliamentary sovereignty and democratic process that they forced this decision to be made in the court.”

    In a statement, he added, “Given the strict two-year timetable of exiting the E.U. once Article 50 is triggered, it is critical that the government now lay out their negotiating to Parliament, before such a vote is held.”

    Cian Murphy, a senior lecturer in public international law at the University of Bristol, wrote on Twitter: “The Article 50 judgment from the High Court: a political bombshell but really rather predicable as a matter of constitutional law.”

    Although Mrs. May has said that lawmakers will eventually be consulted, many fear it will take place too late to influence the shape of Britain’s new relationship with the European Union.

    For example, if Parliament is given a chance to vote on an exit agreement at the end of the two-year period, lawmakers may be forced to choose between endorsing a deal they oppose or leaving the bloc without any formal relationship with it.

    The government had dismissed the case as legal “camouflage,” regarding it as a thinly disguised effort to frustrate the democratic outcome of the June 23 referendum.

    The Conservative Party, which was badly split over the referendum, has now largely embraced its outcome, in many cases enthusiastically.

    Many supporters of the opposition Labour Party also voted to leave the European Union, which will make it harder for their lawmakers to oppose a withdrawal.

    Along with the Supreme Court, the ruling might ultimately be referred to the European Court of Justice, an institution opposed by many who argued for Britain to leave the bloc.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/04/world/europe/uk-brexit-vote-parliament.html
     
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  2. HAIDER

    HAIDER ELITE MEMBER

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    Feel the economic heat so quickly .....lolzzz
     
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  3. waz

    waz SENIOR MODERATOR

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    No it won't, not until the supreme court decides. Even if they rule for a vote, then MP's across the conservative and Labour benches have promised to vote for article 50. They cannot go against their voters, otherwise they can kiss their jobs goodbye. 421 constituencies out of 574 voted to leave the EU, so if May calls an election she will win a landslide anyway hahaha.
    Both these morons who bought the high court action can be hardly called British, Horrible f*cks.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2016
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  4. Khafee

    Khafee BANNED

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    So in other words no hope of UK staying in the EU?
     
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  5. waz

    waz SENIOR MODERATOR

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    Nope, not a hope in hell.
     
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  6. Fawad Sadique

    Fawad Sadique FULL MEMBER

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    Theresa May's urgency to be done with 'BREXIT' just a few weeks ago was such a hard blow to pound and now this... wow...
     
  7. LA se Karachi

    LA se Karachi FULL MEMBER

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    Well, it just seems to be more of a legal issue than an economic one. The ruling will be appealed to the Supreme Court. We'll have to wait and see what it says.
     
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  8. AZADPAKISTAN2009

    AZADPAKISTAN2009 ELITE MEMBER

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    Damn that would be interesting , people in UK will not tolorate "abuse" from their Politicians and Judges they will beat the crap out of their judges and poilticians in matter of days.

    Free nations don't tolorate none sense

    And here I wish our people would grow some Jagarnaut testicles to tackle our corrupt politicians and judges
     
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  9. Zibago

    Zibago ELITE MEMBER

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    Britain has no Brexit plan, leaked memo claims
    November 15, 2016 By: Samaa Web Desk Published in Global Be the first to comment!
    [​IMG]

    LONDON: The British government has no overarching plan for Brexit and may take another six months to agree a negotiating strategy, according to a leaked memo published by The Times on Tuesday.

    Civil servants are struggling to cope with more than 500 Brexit-related projects and an extra 30,000 extra staff may be needed to handle the workload, according to the memo, reportedly prepared for the government by a consultant.

    The document, dated November 7 and titled “Brexit update”, says “no common strategy has emerged” for leaving the European Union, despite lengthy debate among senior officials.

    The government of Prime Minister Theresa May denied the claims and said it did not commission the report.

    “This is not a government report and we don’t recognise the claims made in it,” a spokesman for May’s office said.

    “We are focused on getting on with the job of delivering Brexit and making a success of it,” he said.

    It could take another six months for the British government to agree on its priorities for Brexit, the memo, also seen by the BBC, suggests.

    Although each government department has developed plans to cope with the departure, “this falls considerably short of having a ‘Government plan for Brexit’ because it has no prioritisation and no link to the overall negotiation strategy,” the memo reportedly states.

    It criticises May’s approach, accusing her of “drawing in decisions and details to settle matters herself”.

    May has promised to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty by the end of March next year to formally start the process of leaving the EU, but she has so far given few details of her strategy.

    The leaked memo also says big businesses are expected to “point a gun at the government’s head” after the government assured carmaker Nissan that it would not lose out on investment after Britain leaves the EU.

    May used a key address in the City of London late Monday to say that Britain will seize on Brexit to become a global leader on free trade and “forge new and dynamic trading agreements”. -AFP
    https://www.samaa.tv/international/2016/11/britain-has-no-brexit-plan-leaked-memo-claims/
     
  10. Zibago

    Zibago ELITE MEMBER

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    European leaders agree UK must be forced into hard Brexit

    Senior EU officials fear allowing Britain to exit on its own terms could empower far-right candidates in France and Germany

    Samuel Osborne @SamuelOsborne93 32 minutes ago 293 comments
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    Prime Minister Theresa May is also facing fresh calls to deliver a hard Brexit from a group of 60 Conservative MPs Getty
    European leaders have reportedly come to a 27-nation consensus that the UK must be forced into a hard Brexit in order to counter the rise of populist movements which could break up the European Union.

    Senior EU officials fear allowing Britain to exit on its own terms could empower far-right candidates in France and Germany, which represent an existential danger to the bloc.

    One EU diplomat told told The Observer: “If you British are not prepared to compromise on free movement, the only way to deal with Brexit is hard Brexit.



    You can have 'hard Brexit' or no Brexit at all, EU council president warns UK
    "Otherwise we would be seen to be giving in to a country that is leaving. That would be fatal.”

    Speaking in the wake of Donald Trump's election as president of the United States, Ukip interim leader Nigel Farage warned it could be "game over for the EU" if Marine Le Pen, leader of the Front National, wins France's presidential election.

    It came as Ms May faced fresh calls to deliver a hard Brexit from a group of 60 Conservative MPs, including prominent former cabinet ministers.

    Cameron-era ministers Michael Gove, Iain Duncan Smith, John Whittingdale and Theresa Villiers urged the PM to pull Britain out of the European single market and the customs union.
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    NewsUKUK Politics
    European leaders agree UK must be forced into hard Brexit

    Senior EU officials fear allowing Britain to exit on its own terms could empower far-right candidates in France and Germany

    Samuel Osborne @SamuelOsborne93 32 minutes ago 293 comments
    1K

    Click to follow
    Indy Politics

    Prime Minister Theresa May is also facing fresh calls to deliver a hard Brexit from a group of 60 Conservative MPs Getty
    European leaders have reportedly come to a 27-nation consensus that the UK must be forced into a hard Brexit in order to counter the rise of populist movements which could break up the European Union.

    Senior EU officials fear allowing Britain to exit on its own terms could empower far-right candidates in France and Germany, which represent an existential danger to the bloc.

    One EU diplomat told told The Observer: “If you British are not prepared to compromise on free movement, the only way to deal with Brexit is hard Brexit.



    You can have 'hard Brexit' or no Brexit at all, EU council president warns UK
    "Otherwise we would be seen to be giving in to a country that is leaving. That would be fatal.”

    Speaking in the wake of Donald Trump's election as president of the United States, Ukip interim leader Nigel Farage warned it could be "game over for the EU" if Marine Le Pen, leader of the Front National, wins France's presidential election.

    It came as Ms May faced fresh calls to deliver a hard Brexit from a group of 60 Conservative MPs, including prominent former cabinet ministers.

    Cameron-era ministers Michael Gove, Iain Duncan Smith, John Whittingdale and Theresa Villiers urged the PM to pull Britain out of the European single market and the customs union.


    They claimed getting out of the single market free trade zone was crucial for the UK to become free of Brussels regulations.

    Pulling out of the customs union, which sets common tariffs for goods from countries outside it, would be the only way to strike trade deals with other nations, they said.

    Eleven Labour, DUP and Ukip MPs also reportedly backed the call.

    Brexit Concerns
    22
    show all
    Ms May has previously said she would try to restrict freedom of movement between the UK and EU, a policy which is incompatible with membership of the single market.

    A Government spokesperson said: "We are committed to getting the best possible deal as we leave the EU: one that is unique to Britain, not an ‘off the shelf’ solution.

    READ MORE
    Sixty Tory MPs demand Theresa May commits Britain to a Hard Brexit
    May changes legal case for right to start Brexit without MPs' consent
    Theresa May told to 'stop using EU staff as pawns in Brexit'
    Liz Truss ‘may have broken law in failing to defend Brexit judges’
    Supreme Court urge judge to stand down from Article 50 hearing
    "It's not about binary choices - there is a huge range of possibilities for our future trading relationship with the EU. That's why the Government is painstakingly analysing the challenges and opportunities for all the different sectors of our economy.

    "The Prime Minister has been clear that she wants UK companies to have the maximum freedom to trade with and operate in the Single Market – and to let European businesses do the same here.

    "Beyond that, it's not in the UK's interest to give a running commentary on our thinking that could undermine our negotiating position."
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...ee-movement-a7428021.html?cmpid=facebook-post
    @waz @django @Vergennes
     
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  11. Starlord

    Starlord ELITE MEMBER

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    In the name of Queen they are out of European Union , deal with it ..
     
  12. Louiq XIV

    Louiq XIV FULL MEMBER

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    Hmm I'd rather say "Dear Brits, you're now out of the EU. Bye and deal with it !"
     
  13. waz

    waz SENIOR MODERATOR

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    That's what us Brexit folks have always wanted. Who wants to be part of the single market! It's literally the EU --3 i.e. you don't get a say how things are run and still have to accept its rules for example freedom of movement, customs union etc. We might as well stayed in.
    No thanks, bye and no one apart from the Europhiles will shed a tear, and they're a minority which is growing slower by the day.
     
  14. Star Expedition

    Star Expedition FULL MEMBER

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    The politicians have no courage to solve real problems.
    They leave them to people, and make things worse.
     
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  15. Louiq XIV

    Louiq XIV FULL MEMBER

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    So everything is perfect and the divorce should be quick an easy because they won't be a lot of tears on the continent as well.

    I will be a strong "Bye and good luck".

    Or maybe "bon vent à vous !" from us.
     
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