• Saturday, November 23, 2019

UAE to send first Arab spaceship to Mars by 2021

Discussion in 'Arab Defence Forum' started by United, Jul 17, 2014.

  1. Menace2Society

    Menace2Society SENIOR MEMBER

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    This is really good news. All Muslim countries must pursue scientific discovery.

    Arab astronauts have already begun their training. :rofl:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Al Bhatti

    Al Bhatti SENIOR MEMBER

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    May 26, 2015

    10 facts about the UAE's Space Research Centre in Al Ain
    Around 150 Emirati scientists will be needed to work on the Mars mission by 2020

    Plans for Al Ain’s new space centre were revealed as part of the strategic frameworks plan of the UAE Space Agency, ahead of the fifth Global Space and Satellite Forum in Abu Dhabi. Here are a few facts you need to know about the new research facility.

    1. It costs Dh100 million (US $27 million)

    2. It is expected to open in early 2016

    3. It will be the first space research centre in the Middle East.

    4. It will act as the main headquarters to support UAE’s unmanned Hope Probe for the Mars Mission planned in July 2020

    5. The new centre will be financed by the UAE University and the Telecommunications Regulatory Authority, through the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Fund.

    6. One of the goals for the Space Research Centre is to attract and produce homegrown Emirati men and women space scientists.

    7. An academic programme in space sciences, to support the Mars Mission, will be launched at the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology in Abu Dhabi.

    8. By the end of 2015, the UAE Space Agency will have selected 20 students to be part of an academic delegation to travel overseas and within the UAE as part of its academic space progamme.

    9. The new facility will create many jobs including an estimated 150 for Emirati scientists and engineers who will be needed to work on the Mars mission by 2020.

    10. The Space Research Centre in way is a tribute to Shaikh Zayed who had a keen interest in space and who even met three Apollo Mission astronauts in February of 1976 in a bid to find out what the Arab deserts looked like. He also treasured a replica space shuttle NASA presented him with.

    10 facts about the UAE's Space Research Centre in Al Ain | GulfNews.com
     
  3. Al Bhatti

    Al Bhatti SENIOR MEMBER

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    May 31, 2015

    The Emirati teams behind Emirates Mars Mission
    UAE Mars team comprises around 75 Emiratis, who are divided into seven teams that are collectively in charge of aspects of the mission

    Just like the UAE, the team behind launching Hope, the Emirates Mars Probe is young, ambitious and yearning to be on top.

    In July last year, His Highness Shaikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, President of the UAE, announced that the UAE will send an unmanned spacecraft to Mars by 2021, to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the UAE.

    In April this year, His Higness Shaikh Mohammad Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, officially inaugurated the unveiling of the details of the Emirates Mars Mission. “Our science mission is to produce the first ever truly global picture of the Martian atmosphere. This is the first holistic study of the Martian climate and how the layers of atmosphere fit together,” Omran Sharaf, Emirates Mars Mission Project Manager, said in the video the event.

    Completing the mission in just seven years, to become the first Arab country and the ninth country in the world to do so, is an ambitious goal for a young country like the UAE, so it was no surprise that the team behind turning this dream into a reality are a group of young, passionate Emiratis, who will do whatever it takes to take their country to the pinnacle.

    The UAE Mars team comprises around 75 Emiratis, who are divided into seven teams that are collectively in charge of aspects of the mission. The seven teams include: Probe team, Product Assurance team, Science and Research team, Operations team, Ground Station team, Launch team and Strategic Planning team.

    Key technologies will be designed, built and assembled locally, not imported. Technical knowledge will be developed in the UAE and transferred through collaboration with partners, not outsourced.

    This approach ensures that the mission will leave behind a valuable and enduring legacy in the form of human capital: a generation of experienced scientists and engineers trained and inspired by the Mars mission.

    The UAE government sees the Red Planet project as a turning point in the nation’s development. It will establish the space technology sector as a key economic sector for years to come.

    Globally, space technologies are becoming increasingly important to the security and economy of nations. The sector is integral to many aspects of life from telecommunications and navigation to broadcasting and monitoring of weather and natural disasters.

    To learn more about the team behind implementing the mission and how the mission will help build UAE capabilities in the space sector, Gulf News interviewed integral team leaders and members of the Mars Mission team.

    The Emirati teams behind Emirates Mars Mission | GulfNews.com
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  4. Al Bhatti

    Al Bhatti SENIOR MEMBER

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    May 30, 2015

    Meet the UAE Mars Mission team
    Young, ambitious and committed Emiratis push UAE’s boundaries in space exploration

    Omran Sharaf, project manager
    Projet Manager Overseeing the Emirates Mars Mission
    [​IMG]

    At the age of 32, Sharaf already has an impressive trajectory of experience by virtue of being a part of the development of three satellites — DubaiSat-1, DubaiSat-2 and KhalifaSat. From 2011 to 2014, Sharaf was the director of space imaging processing and analysis.

    He has also been a part of the UAE’s delegation to the United Nations Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space since 2010 and is a member of the UAE’s delegation to and former chair of the International Committee of Global Navigation Satellite Systems.

    As a child, Sharaf was interested in space but never really expected to work in the field as an adult.

    “When I was in high school and trying to decide on what to study [for a career], I chose electrical engineering. I told my family that it would be nice if I could use this [knowledge] to build a satellite. But I never thought that I would actually be doing that because at that time the UAE did not have a space programme.”

    But by the time Sharaf had earned his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virgina, USA, his dream field had become a reality. He joined the UAE space programme and moved to Korea to continue his education and training in this field.

    “I lived in South Korea for seven years. It was an extremely different experience but I would like to say that it was also a very positive one. What surprised me the most were the cultural similarities between the Middle Eastern culture and the Korean culture when it came to areas like hospitality, family values, etc”

    Sharaf earned his masters in Science and Technology Policy from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea.

    Sharaf and his team are responsible for directing, managing and supporting the different ongoing programmes within the Mohammad Bin Rashid Space Centre and identifying new science-led strategic opportunities for the UAE.

    “My main responsibility is to achieve the government objectives. They are very clear objectives — of building scientific capabilities and even technical capabilities in the UAE, starting from the sustainable programme for outer space exploration for the UAE.”

    As part of his work as a project manager, he must follow up with each team in charge of a different aspect of the launch, and direct and support their progress.

    Progress report

    The outer space objectives have been finalised and the team has now started designing the probe according to the science objectives received by the science team.

    “This phase will continue for at least a year and a half and, once that is finalised, we can start the manufacturing, testing and integration process. We have even started the design process of the operation side, which usually comes at a later stage, because we need to have the software and the tools to command and control.”

    Sharaf said the probe has to be ready before 2020. It has to be tested, verified and it has to meet all the requirements that have been set. He said around three probe models will be made using cheaper material before the final probe is created for testing.

    “I am extremely proud to be part of this project. I never thought I would be working on such a mission. I have to say I am very impressed by the leadership’s decision to pursue this goal. It is a catalyst for bigger things to come and will change many things within the region.”

    A fun fact about his team, which comprises 75 Emiratis, is that they work 24/7 and are constantly in meetings.

    “We have teams working 24/7 either from the house or the office. Some members are working even when they are flying on projects other than the Mars mission.

    Sara Amiri
    Lead Science Investigator and Deputy Project Manager
    [​IMG]

    Along with her team, Sara, who holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the American University of Sharjah, is in charge of developing the mission’s scientific objectives, goals, instrumentation and analysis programme.

    She is head of the Aerial Systems programme at Mohammad Bin Rashid Space Centre and is also leading the design and development of the UAE’s first unmanned aerial system.

    Sara said the role of her team comes early in the project, as it is they who request and tell the engineers what to do.

    “Our goal is to generate novel science. We need to collect data that scientists here in the UAE and globally did not have access to up to 2021.”

    The role of the science team, she explained, is to formulate the questions and objectives which the engineers will base their designs on. Sara’s team then ensures that the design and instruments used in building the probe will fulfil the scientific requirements and objectives set for them.

    “The science team will then oversee the development of the instrument. The data being offered by the instrument needs to be tested before going to launch and post-launch. The science team is the initial team that makes sure the data from the instruments is healthy so it is validated to base research on.”

    Sara said the data collected will be shared freely with the international Mars science community.

    Educational outreach

    Another aspect that Sara and her team are a part of is educational outreach.

    “The education public outreach team managed to secure four positions in two very prestigious science research programmes in the US — at University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Colorado, Baltimore. They are going to take part in high-ranking science programmes with scientists who are considered to be at the top at their field in planetary science research so, hopefully, one day those students can be part of the Mars team.”

    Sara said part of the criteria for their selection is how the candidates plan on using what they have learnt once they are back home. “They will go back to their universities and either complete the project with a larger group within one of their courses or spread awareness with regard to science research. We choose individuals based on how passionate they are, how they will impact their communities and how they will spread the knowledge they gain.”

    Developing a science and technology sector

    Sara said developing a science and technology sector is another objective her team is trying to fulfil.

    “Portions of the science team are representatives [students and staff] from our universities here in the UAE. They will have frequent updates by the Mars team and will have access to the data early on to better understand what the data coming from the Mars mission will look like and what kind of research they can do.”

    Sara said the universities that have a seat on the science team include the American University of Sharjah, Khalifa University, Masdar Institute, UAE University, New York University Abu Dhabi and University of Sharjah.

    “We don’t want to end the UAE’s contribution in 2020. We want the universities here to start doing research on that data and to start publishing and to be seen in international conferences and journals and publications.”

    Suhail Al Mheiri
    Deputy project manager and head of the Space Craft Development team.

    [​IMG]

    As project manager, Al Mheiri works with the spacecraft development team who will be responsible for delivering the space craft and the instrument.

    Al Mheiri was part of the team at the Emirates Institution for Advanced Science and Technology, which worked on the development of DubaiSat-1 in South Korea and DubaiSat-2. In addition to working on the Emirates Mars Mission, his team is currently working on the development of KhalifaSat.

    “The current stage we are approaching is the design milestone, so we are doing studies on the design of different aspects and we are also finalising the instrument requirement.”

    Though an entire Mars Mission usually takes longer than seven years to complete, Al Mheiri said he is 100 per cent confident his team will be able to deliver.

    “The Emirates Mars Mission will add to the country’s prestige. We are putting our stamp on the design, developments and decision making; we are not just buying from the market. We want to be creative and want to create more scientists and engineers,” he said.

    Mars Probe will not be launched from the UAE

    Al Mheiri said the UAE Mars Probe will not be launched from the UAE due to different factors.

    “The Mars Probe will be launched from different launcher pads. The locations are not yet been announced because we are still doing research. The launch platform is usually outsourced because there are a lot of experienced providers and their locations are quite ideal — mostly equatorial. Also, the continuous launchers have to be ocean-based.”

    Al Mheiri holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the American University of Sharjah and was awarded a masters in Aerospace Engineering from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea.

    “As a child, I was interested in renewable energy. I even made an amateur solar panel using two plates of copper. This mission will have a huge impact in creating future scientists. We are exciting the community and making them aware of science.”

    Al Mheiri, who now speaks fluent Korean, said his main culture shock was the food.

    “My first lunch in the country was raw fish. I had never eaten it in my life. It was a breakthrough. After that, I never had a problem eating anything ever again.”

    Al Mheiri hopes the Emirates Mars Mission will open the doors for more deep space missions in the future.

    Saeed Al Gergawi
    Part of the strategic planning team, in charge of education and media outreach.

    [​IMG]

    “Our job is to ensure that all the effects of this mission are lasting and sustainable. We work with universities on developing space science, technology and engineering research initiatives that will not only help this mission but make sure that we will have excellent capabilities for future missions.

    Among the initiatives created by the team is the Nayif-1 Cube Sat developed in collaboration with seven Emirati engineers from the American University of Sharjah. Nayif-1 Cube Sat is a satellite in the nano satellite category, which gives the students the opportunity of experiencing all the steps it takes to build a satellite and launch it in space.

    “It is part of their final project; it is part training and part learning about what it takes to build something that will go into space. The students started working on building the engineering module of the satellite last week. So instead of travelling abroad to gain this experience, we are building capabilities here at home.”

    Al Gergawi, who studied management in the US at Eastern Michigan University, said the students are expected to send the Nayif-1 Cube to space next year and, once they do so, they will be the first Emirati university team to send something into space.

    He stressed the importance of investing in space, saying that it is a very inclusive field.

    “To build a spaceship, you need mechanical engineers, electrical engineers; you need every school of thought in engineering to send it into space. Our job now is to ensure that there are programmes to support the mission and support the industry as we move away from oil.”



    Ebrahim Hamza
    Leader of the Emirates Mars Mission Strategic Planning team

    [​IMG]

    Hamza leads the education and media outreach programme at the Mohammad Bin Rashid Space Centre and works with universities and high schools to develop space research initiatives. He graduated from UAE University with a bachelor’s degree in Finance in 2010.



    Adnan Al Rais
    Deputy Project Manager and leader of the Ground Station team
    [​IMG]

    Al Rais and his teams are responsible for the development, design and implementation of the ground segment of the Emirates Mars Mission and also other future deep space missions undertaken by Mohammad bin Rashid Space Centre. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from Khalifa University, Sharjah.

    Khulood Al Harmoodi
    Deputy Project Manager and team leader of the Product Assurance and Logistics team

    [​IMG]

    Khuloud heads the project management team at Mohammad Bin Rashid Space Centre, overseeing and delivering on all aspects of project monitoring, knowledge management and product assurance. Khuloud holds a bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from the American University of Sharjah.

    Noor Al Teneiji
    Liaison Officer

    [​IMG]

    As part of the project management team at Mohammad Bin Rashid Space Centre, Noor was responsible for setting up the project management office at the Emirates Institution for Advanced Science and Technology. Noor is also managing all contractual and financial aspects of the Emirates Mars Mission. Noor holds a bachelor’s degree in Business Management from the UAE Higher Colleges of Technology.

     
  5. Al Bhatti

    Al Bhatti SENIOR MEMBER

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    Mohammad Abdul Rahim
    Launch Segment Lead

    [​IMG]

    As launch lead on the Emirates Mars Mission, Mohammad is responsible for the management of the launch vehicle and spacecraft as well as the satellite launch programme. He is also the mechanical systems specialist for Mohammad Bin Rashid Space Centre’s KhalifaSat satellite.

    Abdul Rahim has a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the American University of Sharjah and a masters in Aerospace Engineering from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology.

    Zakareyya Al Shamsi
    Deputy Project Manager and leader of Mission Operations

    [​IMG]

    Heading the mission operations team for the Emirates Mars Mission, Zakareyya is the Software Systems Section manager in Mohammad Bin Rashid Space Centre’s Space System Development Department and is responsible for the flight software and testing tools being integrated into the Khalifasat satellite. Al Shamsi has a bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from Khalifa University of Science. He gained his masters in Aerospace Engineering (Space Systems) from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, South Korea in 2013.

    Meet the UAE Mars Mission team | GulfNews.com







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    May 31, 2015

    [​IMG]

    Why the July 2020 launch window is crucial for the UAE Mars mission
    Missing the July 2020 window will push back the mission another two years

    Launching the first Arab probe to Mars in July 2020 to reach the planet by 2021 is crucial as missing this ‘launch window’ will set back the mission for another two years.

    His Highness Shaikh Mohammad Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, announced the first Arab probe to Mars will create mankind’s first integrated model of the Red Planet’s atmosphere.

    Omran Sharaf, Emirates Mars Mission Project Manager, said in a video of the Emirates Mars Mission launched recently that the orbiter needs to arrive at Mars by 2021 in time for the UAE’S 50th founding anniversary. In order to do that, the mission should be launched by July 2020.

    “We have to be ready to launch by then. There is no second chance. It’s a race against time,” Sharaf said in the video.

    But how crucial is this launch window to meet the 2021 target?

    “The ‘launch window’ relates to the fact that Earth completes its orbit around the Sun in 12 months, while Mars does that in 22.6 months, roughly twice that of Earth. So the two planets come close to each other roughly once every two years,” Dr Nidhal Guessoum, an astrophysicist and professor of physics and astronomy at the American University of Sharjah, told Gulf News.

    “So if we want to send a spacecraft to Mars and we want the trip to be short(est), we need to launch at or near those proximity points/times,” Dr Guessoum added.

    This coming together of the two planets is known as the Mars Opposition. It happens when the sun and Mars sandwich the Earth, forming nearly a straight line. It happens every 26 months, with the last one happening in April last year.

    Two more Mars Oppositions are scheduled to happen in 2016 and 2018 before the October 13, 2020 Mars Opposition.

    The distance between Earth and Mars varies according to their orbital position, but the average distance is 225 million kilometres. The 2020 Mars Opposition is like a ‘shortcut’ to Mars, albeit not literally, cutting the distance down to 62.1 million kilometres.

    “The ideal time to launch a space probe to Mars is some time before this opposition and the probe is expected to reach Mars after the opposition period. This window is crucial because this window is for a short period and comes once in two years, which makes it the most practical [and economical] time to send a probe to Mars,” Hassan Ahmad Al Hariri, chief executive of the Dubai Astronomy Group, told Gulf News.

    Al Hariri said the window is from July lasting maximum until September 2020.

    “If that, too, is missed then the next opportunity would arise in September 2022,” Al Hariri said.

    The Mohammad Bin Rashid Space Centre, tasked with undertaking the mission, has roughly five years to design, plan, execute, test and ready the spacecraft by July 2020.

    Dr Guessoum said five years is a challenge as missions like this usually take longer to prepare, plan and execute. But he has full confidence that the UAE will make it.

    Al Hariri said: “The UAE isn’t developing everything from scratch as they have the know-how and experience of different international universities as part of this project. So it is safe to say that the time allotted for this programme is sufficient.”

    Why the July 2020 launch window is crucial for the UAE Mars mission | GulfNews.com
     
  6. Chanakya's_Chant

    Chanakya's_Chant SENIOR MEMBER

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  7. Echo_419

    Echo_419 ELITE MEMBER

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  8. Mr.Nair

    Mr.Nair BANNED

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    Last edited: Jun 16, 2015
  9. Echo_419

    Echo_419 ELITE MEMBER

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    Probably we are by 2020 both the GSLV & RLV wipp be ready & don't forget we launch SATs very cheaply
     
  10. Mr.Nair

    Mr.Nair BANNED

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    Very busy schedules for ISRO in coming years.Regional navigation satellites launch,GSLV launch,Moon mission,human space mission and now UAE spacecraft launch and much more.....
     
  11. Echo_419

    Echo_419 ELITE MEMBER

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    Nothing is final though but I hope the Arabs choose us
     
  12. Mr.Nair

    Mr.Nair BANNED

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    India is having good relation with UAE and hope we can wait for 2020 launch if they opt us.
     
  13. black-hawk_101

    black-hawk_101 BANNED

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    Heard that UAE has 88% expat living and working there? Why not they give Nationality to them?