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Tussle over basmati rice origin - India stealing basmati rice heritage from Pakistan

manlion

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On the boil: Pakistan, India tussle over basmati rice origin

KARACHI: Pakistan on Monday said it would give a “befitting reply” to, and oppose, India’s move to geographically label basmati rice and grain as its own in the EU.

Developing countries are increasingly using geographic labeling to boost the value of products ranging from carpets to rice, raising rural incomes and protecting farmland.

A geographical indication (GI) is a sign used on products that have a specific geographic origin, which gives them certain qualities or a reputation, such as Champagne and Darjeeling tea.

India applied for a GI for basmati rice last month. In a meeting chaired by commerce adviser Abdul Razak Dawood on Monday, Pakistan announced it would oppose India’s application.

“Abdul Razak Dawood categorically stated that Pakistan will vehemently oppose India’s application in the EU and restrain India from obtaining exclusive GI tag of basmati rice,” a statement issued by the ministry said.

Pakistan produces a wide range of basmati rice and believes it has a right to a GI tag.

It now has under three months to respond to the Indian application and file a counter application with the EU. The country’s rice exporters face the risk of losing a substantial European market if India succeeds in the geographical labeling, exporters said.

“The GI tag going to India means Pakistan will be losing the European market, and that will not be limited to EU alone; we will not be able to export basmati rice to other countries as well,” Rafique Suleman, convener of the Central Committee of the Federation of Pakistan Chambers of Commerce and industry on Rice, told Arab News.


“Basmati rice is our heritage. The GI tag is an exclusive right to sell goods in the registered markets.”

Pakistan exported $2.17 billion worth of rice during the last fiscal year, of which the share of basmati rice was $790.8 million, 25 percent higher than the previous year, according to the Pakistan Bureau of Statistics.

According to the Rice Exporters Association of Pakistan (REAP), “Pakistan is recognized around the world for producing and exporting high quality and aromatic basmati rice.”

“REAP is the second largest export trade body of Pakistan after the textile sector, and contributes more than $2 billion per annum,” REAP said.

According to the Indian application published in the EU’s official journal on Sept. 11, 2020, basmati is a special long grain aromatic rice grown and produced in a particular geographical region of the Indian sub-continent, below the foothills of the Himalayas.

India’s move is a significant one, especially after the EU revised its rules for fungicides in crops, including rice, in 2018.

According to media reports, it caused New Delhi to lose a significant share in the EU market after tests showed that the basmati produced in India had higher levels of tricylazole, a pesticide that is sprayed on the crop to overcome fungal pests, than those permitted by the EU.

Pakistan, however, had a lot to gain and nearly doubled its exports of the product from 2017 to 2018.

The name basmati is derived from two Sanskrit word roots, “vas” meaning “aroma” and “mati” meaning “ingrained from the origin,” the Indian application says, adding that the first recorded reference to basmati rice is found in the Punjabi poem “Heer Ranjha” by the poet Varis Shah in 1766.


Pakistan opposes Indian claim on Basmati rice in EU

 

manlion

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Indians are adept at stealing, they stole the Dalai Lama from Tibet, Sanskrit from Syria, Buddha from Nepal , basmati, IVC from Pakistan
 

masterchief_mirza

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the Indian application says, adding that the first recorded reference to basmati rice is found in the Punjabi poem “Heer Ranjha” by the poet Varis Shah in 1766
That's Waris Shah, not Varis.

By the way, the protagonists in this particular poem are BOTH from the Pakistani part of Punjab. So these Indian duffers are literally referencing a Pakistani locus of origin as part of their dossier of proofs on basmati's supposed Indian origin.

Do Indians actually bother checking the c.v.'s of these ex-call centre graduates who end up somehow putting these files together?

Perhaps it's one of our ISI boys in fact who has "helped" India with this case.

@Pan-Islamic-Pakistan sir, any knowledge on Heer Ranjhi to verify the above? If basmati is mentioned in a poem set in geographic Pakistan, then it seems to me that basmati is Pakistani produce, misappropriated by some of our easterly neighbours.
 

TNT

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Not to forget india stole even most of Pakistani songs. A chep nation with no innovation skills.
 

Indus Pakistan

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From another thread -

I have noticed a pattern. And I would suggest others look out for this because it informs us as to the problem we have. When foreigners visit Pakistan or are introduced to Pakistan they will describe things with "Pakistani". So they will say today I had Pakistani breakfast or had Pakistani food for lunch. Then they will describe some cultural more as "Pakistani".

However after few days of interaction with Pakistani's they will change and start using terms like "I had desi food for lunch". Or I went to the local shops and bought some "desi clothes" or "Indian cloths". I noticed how Mark Weins go from calling everything "Pakistani" to terms like "lovely desi ghee".

Contrast that to Greeks. They have even appropriated generic food like yoghurt, olives, cheese as "Greek".

If Pakistani's are too scared of branding everything around themselves as "Pakistani" you think the world will. And is that important?


Pakistan risks Basmati export as India applies GI tag in EU
Leading Pakistani rice exporters have called on the government to immediately oppose the Indian application

This "Pakistani" tag is not just academic. It costs Pakistan billions of dollars. It costs Pakistan in lost soft power. Eventually the only time world hears the name Pakistan is for "terrorism" or some other negative. No wonder Pakistan has such a low positive profile in the world.

Going back to the Basmati rice I did some reading on it. From what I read the earliest recorded use of "Basmati rice" is in writing of Waris Shah. One quick Google search told me Waris Shah was born near Sheikhapura in Pakistan';s Punjab.

Yet today the Gangu's are applying to European Union to register Basmati as Indian. Only Pakistani's can fix this.

 

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