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Turkey faces threat of ‘grey-listing’ by global finance watchdog

Neurath

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Turkey faces threat of ‘grey-listing’ by global finance watchdog


According to a report, Turkey may be “greylisted” by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) since it has reportedly failed to combat terrorist financing and money laundering.

The Financial Times reported that that global financial watchdog may approve the decision to put Turkey on the "grey list".

The London-based newspaper reported that Turkey may join 22 other states in the list which is likely to hit the Erdogan regime's ability to raise international investment for the country. The country's currency the Lira has plunged to a historic low against the dollar amid the economic crisis.


The report said Turkey was "put on notice" two years ago by the FATF. The financial body had declared that although Turkey understood “the risks it faces from money laundering and terrorist financing" but it found “serious shortcomings".

FATF officials may move to put Turkey on the list on Thursday in Paris, the report claimed.

There are 22 countries on FATF's grey list including Yemen, South Sudan, Syria, Morocco, Albania, Zimbabwe, Cambodia, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Philippines among others.



Note: Article from WION but the report is from Financial Times. You can see it on their website.
 

SuvarnaTeja

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Bullshit, Turkey is not even a full NATO member anymore. Its cut out of tech and informations.



Turkey: Strong, key member of NATO alliance for 67 years
Turkey among countries which have contributed the most to alliance since joining in 1952, in early years of Cold War
Davut Demircan |04.12.2019

Turkey: Strong, key member of NATO alliance for 67 years



ANKARA
As NATO allies gather for a summit in London this week, the key role that Turkey plays in the alliance is again in the spotlight, amid continuing security concerns in Syria and Turkey’s wider region.
Since becoming a NATO member in 1952 (just three years after its formation), Turkey has been one of the alliance’s biggest contributing partners, making its abilities and capabilities an integral part of the command and force structure of the alliance, with its second-largest army.
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), founded on April 4, 1949, currently has 29 members and is headquartered in Brussels.
In 1952, to its 12 founding countries of Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Britain, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, and the United States, NATO added Turkey.
This month NATO is marking its 70th anniversary in London with the attendance of heads of state and government.
The oft-cited cornerstone of the alliance is Article 5 of the NATO charter, which ensures collective defense -- an attack against one member is an attack against all.

Turkey key partner of alliance
With its mighty military deterrent against terror, Turkey not only makes NATO countries safer but also make it stronger with its capacity, as stated by Western leaders and the alliance’s secretary general.
Speaking last month to French daily Le Figaro, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg stressed Turkey’s importance.
“Turkey accommodates 3.6 million [Syrian] migrants,” he said, more than any country in the world.
He added: “Turkey is very important for NATO. To understand this, [we] need to look at the map and examine the geostrategic situation in Turkey.”
Just five days later, German Chancellor Angela Merkel highlighted Turkey’s geostrategic importance for NATO and called for greater unity and coordination among the allies.
“Turkey should remain a NATO member, and we should also work to ensure this. Turkey’s membership is of strategic importance for NATO,” she stressed.
However, although most or all Western countries support Turkey’s membership and note its importance in NATO, some leaders have criticized Turkey’s anti-terror operation in northern Syria launched in October.
France’s President Emmanuel Macron recently remarked that Turkey should not expect NATO support in northern Syria.
In widely panned remarks, Macron raised doubts about NATO’s future viability and said he believed the alliance was undergoing "brain death."
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu both slammed Macron over the controversial remarks.
"Look Mr. Macron, I speak to you from Turkey, but I will tell you again at NATO [the summit]. First, have your own brain death checked," said Erdogan.
"Macron's words, in my eyes, have no meaning," Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said, adding that the French leader "constantly hosts" terrorists at the Elysee Palace in Paris.
Turkey on Oct. 9 launched Operation Peace Spring to eliminate YPG/PKK terrorists from northern Syria east of the Euphrates River in order to secure Turkey’s borders, aid in the safe return of Syrian refugees, and ensure Syria’s territorial integrity.
In its more than 30-year terror campaign against Turkey, the PKK -- listed as a terrorist organization by Turkey, the U.S. and EU -- has been responsible for the deaths of 40,000 people, including women, children, and infants. The YPG is the PKK's Syrian offshoot.

Turkey’s contributions
Turkey has been the international frontrunner in the fight against terrorism, especially against the terrorist YPG/PKK, Daesh/ISIS and FETO, the group behind the 2016 defeated coup.
The Fetullah Terrorist Organization (FETO) and its U.S.-based leader Fetullah Gulen orchestrated the defeated coup on July 15, 2016, which left 251 people martyred and nearly 2,200 injured.
Turkey also accuses FETO of being behind a long-running campaign to overthrow the state through the infiltration of Turkish institutions, particularly the military, police, and judiciary.
Turkey is also among top five NATO allies giving sustainable support to the alliance mission through 1,100 personnel.
With about €90 million (nearly $100 million), Turkey is among the top eight allies that have contributed the most to NATO funding.
Around 570 Turkish personnel carry out duties under NATO’s mission in Afghanistan.
As part of the Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan, Turkey is one of the “framework nations,” along with the U.S., Germany and Italy.
Supporting operations under the NATO banner in Iraq, Turkey is the alliance’s second-most contributing member after Canada aiding NATO missions in the country.
With 280 personnel, Turkey is a member of NATO’s Kosovo Force (KFOR) multinational peacekeeping force in the Balkans.
A key partner of the alliance, Turkey hosts a radar base within the NATO Ballistic Missile Defense architecture in the town of Kurecik in its eastern Malatya province.
Turkey also opened its Konya Air Base for the use of NATO AWACS planes.
Turkey plays a leading role in the development of relations between NATO and its partners, especially in the Balkans, Caucasus, and Middle East, and in the implementation of NATO's open-door policy.

NATO forces in Aegean, Black Sea
Turkey provides permanent naval assistance to NATO missions in the Aegean Sea, presenting surveillance, reconnaissance, and monitoring activities to prevent illegal crossings.
Turkey also supports Standing NATO Maritime Groups’ (SNMG) activities in the Black Sea, which is included as part of NATO obligations.
Moreover, Turkey also hosts LANDCOM, NATO’s land command, in the Aegean coastal province of Izmir.
The NATO Rapid Deployable Corps – one of nine NATO land forces headquarters with high readiness level – is also stationed in Istanbul.
Turkey is also set to take command of the Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF) in 2021.
NATO67years.jpg



 

Foinikas

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Turkey: Strong, key member of NATO alliance for 67 years
Turkey among countries which have contributed the most to alliance since joining in 1952, in early years of Cold War
Davut Demircan |04.12.2019

Turkey: Strong, key member of NATO alliance for 67 years



ANKARA
As NATO allies gather for a summit in London this week, the key role that Turkey plays in the alliance is again in the spotlight, amid continuing security concerns in Syria and Turkey’s wider region.
Since becoming a NATO member in 1952 (just three years after its formation), Turkey has been one of the alliance’s biggest contributing partners, making its abilities and capabilities an integral part of the command and force structure of the alliance, with its second-largest army.
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), founded on April 4, 1949, currently has 29 members and is headquartered in Brussels.
In 1952, to its 12 founding countries of Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Britain, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, and the United States, NATO added Turkey.
This month NATO is marking its 70th anniversary in London with the attendance of heads of state and government.
The oft-cited cornerstone of the alliance is Article 5 of the NATO charter, which ensures collective defense -- an attack against one member is an attack against all.

Turkey key partner of alliance
With its mighty military deterrent against terror, Turkey not only makes NATO countries safer but also make it stronger with its capacity, as stated by Western leaders and the alliance’s secretary general.
Speaking last month to French daily Le Figaro, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg stressed Turkey’s importance.
“Turkey accommodates 3.6 million [Syrian] migrants,” he said, more than any country in the world.
He added: “Turkey is very important for NATO. To understand this, [we] need to look at the map and examine the geostrategic situation in Turkey.”
Just five days later, German Chancellor Angela Merkel highlighted Turkey’s geostrategic importance for NATO and called for greater unity and coordination among the allies.
“Turkey should remain a NATO member, and we should also work to ensure this. Turkey’s membership is of strategic importance for NATO,” she stressed.
However, although most or all Western countries support Turkey’s membership and note its importance in NATO, some leaders have criticized Turkey’s anti-terror operation in northern Syria launched in October.
France’s President Emmanuel Macron recently remarked that Turkey should not expect NATO support in northern Syria.
In widely panned remarks, Macron raised doubts about NATO’s future viability and said he believed the alliance was undergoing "brain death."
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu both slammed Macron over the controversial remarks.
"Look Mr. Macron, I speak to you from Turkey, but I will tell you again at NATO [the summit]. First, have your own brain death checked," said Erdogan.
"Macron's words, in my eyes, have no meaning," Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said, adding that the French leader "constantly hosts" terrorists at the Elysee Palace in Paris.
Turkey on Oct. 9 launched Operation Peace Spring to eliminate YPG/PKK terrorists from northern Syria east of the Euphrates River in order to secure Turkey’s borders, aid in the safe return of Syrian refugees, and ensure Syria’s territorial integrity.
In its more than 30-year terror campaign against Turkey, the PKK -- listed as a terrorist organization by Turkey, the U.S. and EU -- has been responsible for the deaths of 40,000 people, including women, children, and infants. The YPG is the PKK's Syrian offshoot.

Turkey’s contributions
Turkey has been the international frontrunner in the fight against terrorism, especially against the terrorist YPG/PKK, Daesh/ISIS and FETO, the group behind the 2016 defeated coup.
The Fetullah Terrorist Organization (FETO) and its U.S.-based leader Fetullah Gulen orchestrated the defeated coup on July 15, 2016, which left 251 people martyred and nearly 2,200 injured.
Turkey also accuses FETO of being behind a long-running campaign to overthrow the state through the infiltration of Turkish institutions, particularly the military, police, and judiciary.
Turkey is also among top five NATO allies giving sustainable support to the alliance mission through 1,100 personnel.
With about €90 million (nearly $100 million), Turkey is among the top eight allies that have contributed the most to NATO funding.
Around 570 Turkish personnel carry out duties under NATO’s mission in Afghanistan.
As part of the Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan, Turkey is one of the “framework nations,” along with the U.S., Germany and Italy.
Supporting operations under the NATO banner in Iraq, Turkey is the alliance’s second-most contributing member after Canada aiding NATO missions in the country.
With 280 personnel, Turkey is a member of NATO’s Kosovo Force (KFOR) multinational peacekeeping force in the Balkans.
A key partner of the alliance, Turkey hosts a radar base within the NATO Ballistic Missile Defense architecture in the town of Kurecik in its eastern Malatya province.
Turkey also opened its Konya Air Base for the use of NATO AWACS planes.
Turkey plays a leading role in the development of relations between NATO and its partners, especially in the Balkans, Caucasus, and Middle East, and in the implementation of NATO's open-door policy.

NATO forces in Aegean, Black Sea
Turkey provides permanent naval assistance to NATO missions in the Aegean Sea, presenting surveillance, reconnaissance, and monitoring activities to prevent illegal crossings.
Turkey also supports Standing NATO Maritime Groups’ (SNMG) activities in the Black Sea, which is included as part of NATO obligations.
Moreover, Turkey also hosts LANDCOM, NATO’s land command, in the Aegean coastal province of Izmir.
The NATO Rapid Deployable Corps – one of nine NATO land forces headquarters with high readiness level – is also stationed in Istanbul.
Turkey is also set to take command of the Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF) in 2021.
NATO67years.jpg




That's a Turkish source. The infographic is made by "Anadolu Agency".
 

SuvarnaTeja

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So who is alleging that Turkey funded any terror groups at FATF?

May be Greece, Saudi Arabia, GCC or Scandinavian countries.
So who is alleging that Turkey funded any terror groups at FATF?



President Erdoğan cheats on FATF rules in cracking down on terrorist groups in Turkey
by Abdullah Bozkurt
July 26, 2021

President Erdoğan cheats on FATF rules in cracking down on terrorist groups in Turkey
FATF



Abdullah Bozkurt/Stockholm

The government of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, which has aided and abetted armed jihadist groups and laundered money for drug traffickers and Iranian regime elements, continues its charade of pretending to strive for compliance with the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), the global money laundering and terrorist financing watchdog.
A bill pushed through parliament advertised as Turkey’s intention to address long-running shortcomings in the terrorism financing and money laundering framework is full of new loopholes that were designed to give President Erdoğan a free hand in undermining FATF recommendations.
The most striking shortcoming in the legislation is the absence of any provision concerning a politically exposed person (PEP), going to the heart of the problem in Turkey’s legal and administrative regulatory framework, which systematically fails to crack down on terrorist financing and money laundering activities.

The FATF recommendation on PEPs was not followed Turkey:
Abdullah Bozkurt
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Abdullah Bozkurt
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Landmark cases in 2014 concerning al-Qaeda and the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) Quds Force terror networks in Turkey revealed that the key operatives in such terrorist outfits have strong protection under the shield of PEPs.
Erdoğan himself abused his authority in shielding individuals listed by the UN Security Council. For example, he took Saudi national Yasin al-Qadi, a one-time al-Qaeda financier, under his wing and defended him. Erdoğan even secretly transported al-Qadi in in his presidential plane when he was still on the UN and US terror lists and helped him enter Turkey illegally several times in a flagrant violation of UN Security Council resolutions and Turkish anti-terror laws. His son Bilal Erdoğan struck deals with al-Qadi, who moved millions of dollars to Turkey.
The Turkish president took kickbacks from Reza Zarrab, a dual Iranian-Turkish national who was laundering money for Iranian regime elements in defiance of US sanctions. Zarrab turned government witness in a federal case in New York and blew the whistle on Erdoğan, his son-in-law Berat Albayrak and their associates who helped him facilitate fictitious trade using Turkish state and private banks to launder IRGC funds.
Just a quick glance at the US Treasury designations is enough to show a long list of individuals and outfits that moved funds in Turkey on behalf of al-Qaeda and the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) in recent years. Turkey watchers believe such operations could not have been carried out without some sort of help from the political authorities in Turkey.

alQadi1-300x198.jpg
A secret meeting in Turkey with Saudi businessman Yasin al-Qadi.

It’s not surprising that in a FATF mutual evaluation report issued in December 2019 after the visit of a FATF delegation to Turkey in March 2019 Turkey was rated as non-compliant with PEPs. “The key technical deficiency was that Turkey had not implemented AML/CFT measures concerning the establishment of customer relationships with PEPs,” the report noted. There is no specific reference in Turkish law or regulations concerning foreign or domestic PEPs, the FATF added.
Turkey promised to address this loophole and follow the FATF recommendations. However, the business-as-usual approach was seen when the 43-article bill, touted as compliance with the FATF rules, was submitted to parliament by Erdoğan’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) on December 16, 2020. The AKP deliberately omitted this crucial FATF recommendation and merely expanded the government’s powers in cracking down on the legitimate opposition and critical groups under the pretext of combatting terrorism.
The track record of the Erdoğan government since 2015 shows a clear pattern of blatant abuse of laws on terrorism financing in its clamping down on legitimate opposition groups, from Kurds to members of the Gülen movement. The assets of thousands of people with alleged ties to the Gülen movement were confiscated or frozen by the government. According to a report by the Brussels-based human rights group Platform for Peace and Justice (PPJ), the total value of confiscated or frozen assets is $32 billion.

Full text of the Turkish bill that ignored key FATF recommendation on PEPs and was advertised as Turkey’s intent to comply with the FATF:












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On the other hand, the government rarely or belatedly used the anti-terror laws including the financing of terrorism provisions on al-Qaeda, ISIS or other armed jihadist groups. The belief was that Erdoğan would invoke new executive privileges to further exert pressure on his opponents and critics rather than on real terrorist outfits.
The bill, officially titled Law No. 7262 on Preventing Financing of Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, was pushed through Parliament by the AKP, which indicates that the Erdoğan government was worried about possible negative repercussions if it did not act on the FATF recommendations.
In fact, when the bill was submitted to the speaker’s office on December 16, 2020, it was immediately referred to the Justice Committee, which scheduled a meeting on December 18 without providing adequate time for opposition parties to study and review the proposed legislation that brought many amendments to the existing laws.

The documents show the Erdoğan government rushed the bill through parliament, purportedly to address shortcomings in terrorist financing. The bill stopped short of complying with key FATF recommendations:









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According to the opposition in parliament, the real motivation behind the rush was concern that Turkey would be placed on a grey list by the FATF, which would inevitably hamper Turkey’s efforts to attract foreign investment amid the pandemic and cause woes in the Turkish economy.
The opposition also presented the omission of PEPs from the bill as evidence that the Erdoğan government was not sincere in combatting the financing of terrorism. It noted that the FATF would realize this shortcoming as well and would not prevent the risks Turkey was facing as a result.
When it comes to civil society organizations and associations, the Interior Ministry was given new and sweeping powers in the new bill, prompting concerns that the Erdoğan government would exert more pressure on civil society, which was already suffocating under immense pressure from the government.

The Turkish opposition criticized the bill for the absence of any provision on PEPs:




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There are also serious questions as to whether current Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu, a far-right nationalist figure with alleged ties to mobs and drug traffickers, would be willing to enforce the new provisions to hinder money laundering and drug trafficking activities that he is alleged to have participated in himself.
What is more, the Financial Crimes Investigation Board (MASAK), the body that coordinates with the FATF, became a political whip in the hands of the Erdoğan government after the mass purge of senior police chiefs and top administrators in the Interior Ministry. MASAK has been busy in producing reports that help the Erdoğan government to confiscate the assets of legitimate businesspeople, journalists and human rights activists under the pretext of battling terrorism.

Hayrettin_Kurt_MASAK_Chief-300x235.jpg
Hayrettin Kurt, the head of MASAK, was criticized for doing the bidding of the government under the pretext of battling terrorist financing.

In the meantime, real terrorist groups, drug traffickers and organized crime syndicates continue to escape the scrutiny of MASAK, which operates under Soylu’s Interior Ministry. Sedat Peker, a convicted mob boss and former ally of the Turkish president, recently claimed in a video posted on YouTube that current MASAK president Hayrettin Kurt was blackmailed by the government with an ongoing terrorist investigation into his wife on alleged links to the Gülen movement. He said MASAK issues reports according to whims of the government.
The conflicting reports issued by MASAK shows how it was manipulated by the government according to the political and personal agenda pursued by the Turkish president. For example, Sezgin Baran Korkmaz, a racketeer who was indicted on multiple criminal charges by US federal prosecutors and currently facing extradition proceedings on a US warrant in Austria, was cleared by MASAK when he was working with President Erdoğan to move funds and take over companies owned by Erdoğan critics.
When Korkmaz had a falling out with Erdoğan, who was apparently concerned that Korkmaz’s shady business dealings in the US would boomerang on him, Erdoğan ordered a new MASAK report that contradicted the previous one.


 

Great Janjua

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Without Turkey Nato pursuits of taking on, Russia will collapse in a heartbeat. The black sea is Turkeys backyard if Nato is found disconcerting Turkey it will compel Turkey into Russian camp now that's a challenge no one wants to take up.
 

SuvarnaTeja

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Turkey has defended Pakistan in FATF. Now Pakistan will return the favor :-)

Yes. Tukey did a lot for Pakistan. Pakistan owes Turkey a big time.



Turkey tried to open a back door for Pakistan at FATF, China bailed out
Pakistan can get off the FATF grey list only after the watchdog concludes that it has not only created the legal framework to curb terror financing but is also enforcing the laws.
Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan has been accused by the opposition of pushing stringent laws, ostensibly required to fulfil its FATF commitments, that can be used to target them(REUTERS)


Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan has been accused by the opposition of pushing stringent laws, ostensibly required to fulfil its FATF commitments, that can be used to target them(REUTERS)
Updated on Oct 26, 2020 06:05 PM IST

Hindustan Times, New Delhi | By Shishir Gupta
Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s Turkey, the only country to back Pakistan at the plenary meeting of the global anti-money laundering watchdog, had proposed a special visit to Islamabad to make an onsite assessment of the Imran Khan government’s implementation to plug holes in its legal framework to curb terror financing.
The suggestion at the plenary last week before February 2021 was seen as an effort to let Pakistan off the hook for now and immediately place it on the white list but was not supported by any other country including ‘all-weather ally’ China and Malaysia. Turkey, Pakistan and Malaysia have been trying to emerge as a new radical Islamic axis to upstage the established order led by Saudi Arabia.
The Financial Action Task Force (FATF) eventually decided to retain Pakistan on its grey list, comprising countries whose controls over terror financing are deemed inadequate and are placed “under increased monitoring”. It was also handed out a sharp warning by FATF president Marcus Pleyer, who told Islamabad that it couldn’t take forever to deliver.
Indian counter-terror officials said Turkey’s unsuccessful attempt to pull Pakistan out of the grey list reflected a lack of diplomatic support across the member states for Pakistan that is often described by India as an epicentre of terrorism in South Asia.
“It does appear that Pakistan’s efforts to exit the grey list have reached a dead end, not unless it takes substantive and not cosmetic steps to tighten control over terror financing over the next four months,” a top counter-terror official in New Delhi said. Prime Minister Imran Khan, who already faces a combined opposition offensive, hadn’t said a word on the FATF decision.
Global dirty money watchdog FATF is scheduled to review Pakistan’s status again in 4 months.
If the FATF’s plenary concludes that Pakistan has completed the 27 action points, the watchdog will move to the next stage to send a team to Islamabad to evaluate if the measures in place are working effectively. It is only if Pakistan clears this test that the FATF would consider letting Pakistan emerge out of the grey list.
Indian officials said this is going to be a big ask that Islamabad is unlikely to be able to deliver on, particularly given the deep linkages between the terror groups and the establishment that uses them as tools to serve its interests in Jammu and Kashmir and Afghanistan.
Enacting laws is the easier part. Enforcing them on the ground will be difficult, an Indian official said, pointing to allegations from the opposition that Imran Khan went on an overdrive not to get out of the FATF grey list but arm himself with laws to target opposition leaders.
“It is going to be unlikely that Pakistan will crack down on terror groups that the establishment has conceived, birthed and nurtured,” a second official said. By way of example, he pointed to the long list of terrorists designated by the United Nations who have a free run in Pakistan.
“The UNSC 1267 Sanctions List has 130 names from Pakistan, which claims that it can locate only 19,” the second official cited above added, wondering if the Pakistan Army - which the opposition alleges holds the remote control to the government - can throw Pakistan’s terror leadership behind bars.


 

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