• Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Timeline and Updates on Indian P-81 Maritime Surveillance and Anti-Submarine Aircraft

Discussion in 'Naval Warfare' started by Ivan, Aug 1, 2020.

  1. Ivan

    Ivan FULL MEMBER

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    By |George Allison |April 15, 2020

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    India is planning on purchasing 10 AGM-84L Harpoon Block II anti-ship missiles at $92 million in addition to 16 MK54 torpedoes at $63 million for it’s P-81 Maritime Patrol Aircraft fleet.

    The contract notifications were posted by the Defense Security Cooperation Agency and are not notices of final sales. Once permission to sell is given, the contracts will then be negotiated.

    The first notification for 10 AGM-84L Harpoon Block II anti-ship missiles is as follows:

    The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of India of ten (10) AGM-84L Harpoon Block II air launched missiles and related equipment for an estimated cost of $92 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale today.

    The Government of India has requested to buy ten (10) AGM-84L Harpoon Block II air launched missiles. Also included are containers, spare and repair parts, support and test equipment, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, Specialized Assignment Airlift Missions (SAAM), U.S. Government and contractor representatives technical assistance, engineering, and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics and program support. The estimated program cost is $92 million.

    This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to strengthen the U.S.-Indian strategic relationship and to improve the security of a major defensive partner, which continues to be an important force for political stability, peace, and economic progress in the Indo-Pacific and South Asia region.

    The proposed sale will improve India’s capability to meet current and future threats from enemy weapon systems. The Harpoon missile system will be integrated into the P-8I aircraft to conduct anti-surface warfare missions in defense of critical sea lanes while enhancing interoperability with the United States and other allied forces. India will use the enhanced capability as a deterrent to regional threats and to strengthen its homeland defense. India will have no difficulty absorbing this equipment into its armed forces.”

    The notice for 16 MK54 torpedoes is as follows:

    “The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of India of sixteen (16) MK 54 All Up Round Lightweight Torpedoes (LWT); three (3) MK 54 Exercise Torpedoes (MK 54 LWT Kit procurement required); and related equipment for an estimated cost of $63 million. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale today.

    The Government of India has requested to buy sixteen (16) MK 54 All Up Round Lightweight Torpedoes (LWT); and three (3) MK 54 Exercise Torpedoes (MK 54 LWT Kit procurement required). Also included are MK 54 spare parts; torpedo containers; two (2) Recoverable Exercise Torpedoes (REXTORP) with containers; Fleet Exercise Section (FES) and fuel tanks built into MK 54 LWT Kits (above); air launch accessories for fixed wing; spare parts; training, publications; support and test equipment; U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical, and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistics support. The estimated program cost is $63 million.

    This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to strengthen the U.S.-Indian strategic relationship and to improve the security of a major defensive partner, which continues to be an important force for political stability, peace, and economic progress in the Indo-Pacific and South Asia region.

    The proposed sale will improve India’s capability to meet current and future threats from enemy weapon systems. The MK 54 Lightweight Torpedo will provide the capability to conduct anti-submarine warfare missions. India will use the enhanced capability as a deterrent to regional threats and to strengthen its homeland defense. India intends to utilize MK 54 Lightweight Torpedoes on its P-8I aircraft. India will have no difficulty absorbing these systems into its armed forces.”



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    Shiv Aroor |Feb 18 2020 |10 30 am

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    The Indian Navy’s Boeing P-8I long range maritime reconnaissance & anti-submarine aircraft could be fitted with a list of crucial U.S. technologies that had earlier been held back by the United States owing to the absence of a necessary bilateral agreement. Well, theoretically. It all depends on whether the Indian Navy wants it.

    First, some background.

    The Indian Navy contracted for eight P-8I jets in January 2009, at which time India wasn’t yet a signatory to the Communications Compatibility and Security Agreement (COMCASA), resulting in a large list of sensitive proprietary systems being held off the Indian planes. Four additional P-8I jets ordered by the Indian Navy in 2016, which begin delivery in April this year, will similarly be without the U.S. proprietary tech. In 2018, after over a decade in discussion, India and the United States finally signed the COMCASA, for the first time paving the way for U.S. high-end secured/encrypted communication equipment on American platforms supplied.

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    The 9th P-8I for the Indian Navy seen here under construction months ago

    A year after the facilitation framework of the COMCASA kicked into action, the Indian MoD in November last year cleared the Indian Navy to contract for six more P-8Is. This new deal, currently being negotiated between India and the U.S. Government, will be the first U.S.-India aircraft contract under the new COMCASA regime. Livefist can confirm that while certain software changes have been asked for on the new jets, the Indian Navy hasn’t taken a decision yet on whether it wishes to consider the items held back by the US Government earlier. The Indian MoD is also keen to keep cost contours on par with the previous P-8I deals, and that could slow progress towards a contract.

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    If India manages to negotiate a 6 P-8I contract that includes U.S. equipment held back on the first 12 P-8Is, it would be reasonable to assume that India will be looking to get the earlier aircraft retrofitted with the said systems to maintain commonality. As things stand, the Indian Navy will likely be looking to contract the P-8Is without the said U.S. equipment — and staying with the Indian equipment earlier contracted in replacement. The original 8 P-8Is, as Livefist first detailed here, were integrated with Indian-made replacement systems for encrypted voice, IFF and advanced secret communication equipment. This diagram provides a clear picture of the kinds of systems held off the pre-COMCASA P-8Is and per force replaced with Indian systems.

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    What’s crucial is that the items earlier held back are now available in case the Indian Navy wants to get them — the U.S. Government has also conveyed that such equipment would go a way towards true communications interoperability. Should that situation arise, the Indian Navy will be looking to choose from a list of 5 pieces of equipment that includes (or similar to) the AN/ARC-222 Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS) manufacured by Magnovox and administered by the US Air Force, KV-119 IFF Digital Transponder (Mode 4 Crypto Applique) manufactured by Raytheon, TACTERM/ANDVT Secure Voice (HF) Terminal, VINSON KY-58 Secure Voice (UHF/VHF) Module and the Rockwell-Collins AN/ARC-210(V) SATCOM Transceiver’s COMSEC/DAMA embdedded RT.

    The SINCGARS, for instance, is a combat net radio deployed by the US military for encrypted voice and data communications. The KV-119 is a highly evolved Identify Friend/Foe transponder. The ANDVT is a secure voice terminal for low bandwidth secure voice communications in use throughout the US military. The VINSON KY-58 is a secure voice module that involves encrypted communication to and from military aircraft and other vehicles. The AN/ARC-210 is a family of radios for military aircraft that provides two-way voice and data communications across modes. These or pieces of equipment similar to these were also held off the Indian Air Force’s C-130J Super Hercules transport aircraft.

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    Indian Navy P-8I in Qatar in 2019 for the ‘Roar Of The Sea’ exercise
    Barring any additions and software tweaks, the new P-8Is being negotiated will be identical to the ones in service with the Indian Navy, sporting the Raytheon AN/APY-10 primary radar and L-3 Communications Wescam MX-20HD digital electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) multispectral sensor turret, and two sensors absent on the US Navy’s P-8As that were specifically asked for by the Indian Navy — the Telephonics APS-143 OceanEye aft radar and CAE AN/ASQ 508A magnetic anomaly detector.

    The Indian Navy’s ninth P-8I will be delivered in April this year, with three more to arrive next year. While home base will remain Arakkonam on India’s east coast, work has begun to give the Indian Navy the flexibility to base the aircraft in Goa and Port Blair. The deal for six more aircraft could be signed by the end of this year, though it could take longer.

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    Shiv Aroor |Nov 28 2019 |7 17 pm

    India-P-8I_high-res.jpg

    Given how deeply satisfied the Indian Navy has been with the fleet, it was only a matter of time. The Indian Navy’s case for more of these aircraft has been too strong to delay further. And that’s why the Indian MoD today cleared decks for the Indian Navy to acquire six additional Boeing P-8I long range maritime surveillance and anti-submarine aircraft. With eight already in service, and four ordered in 2016, the fresh imminent acquisition will give the Indian Navy a fleet of 18 aircraft. The four additional aircraft already on order will be delivered in 2020-21.

    The Harpoon-armed P-8I has ably plugged into the Indian Navy’s vast responsibilities in the region, finding itself deployed across missions, from tracking Chinese submarines in the Indian Ocean to assisting in the hunt for the missing MH370 airliner, disaster response, and crucially, the search for lost military aircraft in India’s notoriously difficult north-east. A pair of these aircraft were particularly helpful in keeping tabs on Chinese movements during the Doklam military standoff between India and China in 2017, and kept an eye on the Indian Air Force’s vintage Dakota DC-3 when it was flown in last year. The tracking of Chinese nuclear submarines in the southern Indian Ocean (we’ll have a more detailed report on this shortly) is one of the chief reasons why the Indian Navy has insisted on a larger fleet of P-8Is. The aircraft are said to have performed well in tracking missions in 2017-18.

    Indian P-8Is have also been fielded regularly at exercises. One recently flew to Qatar for the Roar Of The Seas exercise, the first naval exercise between the two countries:

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    P-8I in Qatar this month for ‘Roar Of The Seas’ exercise

    As things stand, the Indian Navy will be looking to expand P-8I operations beyond the fleet’s current home base in Arakkonam in Tamil Nadu.

    The next step is to develop maintenance facilities for the fleet in the Andaman Islands and Goa to give the Indian Navy flexibility in deploying these aircraft where they are needed the most,” says Capt. Dalip Kumar Sharma (Retd.), former spokesperson for the Indian Navy, and who helmed the service’s public affairs during much of the P-8Is entry into Indian service. He indicates the staggered deliveries of the P-8I were requested by the Indian Navy to allow for additional support infrastructure for the P-8I at air stations beyond Arakkonam.

    [​IMG]

    Primary and secondary maintenance facilities will come up at the Port Blair air station followed by a limited support infrastructure at the INS Hansa naval air station in Goa, where the Indian Navy operates its Il-38SD maritime surveillance aircraft fleet. The P-8Is augmented and then replaced the Indian Navy’s old Soviet Tu-142s, which were retired last year. It is understood that P-8I infrastructure at Goa will be more than just a ‘stage-through’, with a limited maintenance facility likely.

    [​IMG]
    P-8I on maiden visit to Car Nicobar in Oct 2018

    Boeing began delivering P-8Is to the Indian Navy in May 2013. The aircraft deal was signed long before India and the United States had signed COMCASA, an India-specific version of the Communications Interoperability & Security Memorandum of Agreement (CISMOA) that facilitated the export of advanced/sensitive technologies. As a result, the Indian Navy P-8I came without certain kit standard on the US Navy version. These were made up for with Indian-developed systems sourced from Indian defence firms, an excellent early example of the Indian private sector meeting specific high technology needs in the defence space, and something that would clear the way for much current work:

    [​IMG]

    Like the US Navy version, the Indian Navy’s P-8I sports the Raytheon AN/APY-10 as its primary maritime radar. The Indian version, however, also comes fitted with an aft radar, the Telephonics APS-143 OceanEye and the CAE AN/ASQ 508A magnetic anomaly detector (MAD). Livefist learns that the Indian Navy is weighing a performance-linked logistics & sustainment plan with Boeing for P-8I fleet on the lines of what the Indian Air Force has with its fleet of 11 C-17 Globemasters.

    It isn’t clear of the Indian Navy will look for more than 18 P-8Is. The navy contemplated a medium range maritime surveillance (MRMR) capability, and even floated a contest inviting bids for more modest aircraft for tactical/coastal reconnaissance. The erstwhile contest saw Boeing field a P-8I ‘Lite’, stripped of certain advanced sensors and technology. Things have changed since, with the Indian Navy placing such missions mostly on its Dornier Do-228 fleet, with a door tentatively open for the proposed C295 based multi-mission maritime aircraft being developed by India’s DRDO.

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    Indian Navy procures 4 P-81
    27th July, 2016


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    5 JANUARY 2009


    The Government of India has selected Boeing to provide eight P-8I long-range maritime reconnaissance and anti-submarine warfare aircraft to the Indian navy.

    India is the first international customer for the P-81, a variant of the P-8A Poseidon being developed for the US Navy.

    The P-8I is a multi-mission maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) that can operate effectively over land or water while performing anti-submarine warfare missions; search and rescue; maritime interdiction; and long-range intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance.

    President and CEO of Boeing Integrated Defense Systems, Jim Albaugh said that he was pleased with India’s decision to select the P-81.

    This aircraft will provide outstanding capabilities tailored to India’s unique maritime-patrol requirements,” Albaugh said.

    Boeing IDS vice president and India country head, Vivek Lall said that the deal would give India the most advanced anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare aircraft in the world today.

    The result of these efforts will bring the Indian Navy advanced technology that is unmatched in maritime reconnaissance aircraft and the reach and capability it needs to defend India’s vast coastline and maritime waters,” Lall said.

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    P-8I Multimission Maritime Patrol Aircraft


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    Boeing P-81 is a long-range, multimission maritime patrol aircraft designed for the Indian Navy. Image Courtesy of Boeing

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    P8I is a long-range, multimission maritime patrol aircraft manufactured by Boeing, for the Indian Navy. It is a variant of the P-8A Poseidon operated by the US Navy. P-8I is intended to replace the ageing fleet of Tupolev Tu-142 aircraft that are in service with the Indian Navy.

    The P-8I aircraft was designed to protect the vast coastline and territorial waters of India. It can conduct anti-submarine warfare (ASW), anti-surface warfare (AsuW), intelligence, maritime patrol, and surveillance and reconnaissance missions.

    Orders and deliveries of Boeing’s aircraft
    P-8I is intended to replace the ageing fleet of Tupolev Tu-142 aircraft that are in service with the Indian Navy.
    In January 2009, Boeing was selected by the Indian Government to supply eight P-8I maritime reconnaissance aircraft to the Indian Navy. The contract also includes an option for four P-8I aircraft. The Indian Navy is the first export customer for the aircraft.

    The maiden flight of the first P-8I aircraft was made in September 2011. The official flight test programme of the aircraft began in July 2012. The second P-8I aircraft performed its first flight in the same month.

    The first P-8I aircraft was delivered to the Indian Navy in December 2012. The remaining aircraft were delivered between 2013 and 2015.

    The India’s Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) approved the acquisition of four additional Boeing P-8I aircraft in mid-2016.

    P-8I design and construction
    The P-8I aircraft is based on the Boeing Next Generation 737-800 aircraft. The forward section of the under-fuselage houses an internal weapons bay. The wings are fitted with hardpoints for carrying air-to-surface missiles.

    The aircraft has a length of 39.47m, wing span of 37.64m and a height of 12.83m. The maximum take-off gross weight of the P-8I is 85,139kg.

    The P-8I aircraft are produced by a Boeing-led industry team, comprising CFM International, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Spirit AeroSystems, BAE Systems and GE Aviation. The aircraft are being built at Boeing’s production facility in Renton.

    The fuselage is built by Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita and shipped to Renton, for fabrication and final assembly. The flight testing of P-8I is conducted from Boeing Field in Seattle. The final design review was concluded in July 2010 and production of the P-8I began in December 2010. The final assembly of the first aircraft was completed in August 2011.

    P-8I cockpit, avionics and weapons
    The P-8I aircraft is manned by nine crew members. The cockpit is integrated with primary flight display, multifunction displays, identification friend or foe (IFF), flight management system and stores management system.

    The P-8I aircraft is based on the Boeing Next Generation 737-800 aircraft.
    The aircraft is equipped with a CAE AN/ASQ-508A magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) system, APS-143C(V)3 multimode radar and a global version of the Raytheon APY-10 surveillance radar.

    The APY-10 radar provides precise information in all-weather, day and night missions. The P-8I also integrates BEL Data Link II communications system, Avantel mobile satellite system and a speech secrecy system from Electronics Corporation of India (ECIL).

    The internal weapons bay can house Mark 54 torpedoes, depth charges and free-fall bombs. The under-wing hardpoints can be armed with air-to-surface missiles.

    In December 2010, India requested a sale of AGM-84L Harpoon Block II anti-ship missiles and associated equipment to equip its P-8I aircraft. The Harpoon Block II carries a 226kg blast / fragmentation warhead. It can be fired against land and sea targets.

    Countermeasures of the Indian Navy aircraft
    The countermeasures are provided by directional infrared countermeasures (DIRCM) system and the electronic support measures (ESM) system supplied by Northrop Grumman. The DIRCM can protect the aircraft from incoming infrared guided missiles.

    Engines and performance
    The P-8I aircraft is powered by two CFM56-7 engines supplied by CFM International, a joint venture between Snecma Moteurs and GE Electric. Each engine provides a take-off thrust of 27,300lb. The engines are equipped with a new-generation full authority digital engine control (FADEC) system.

    The P-8I aircraft can fly at a maximum speed of 789km/h and can reach a maximum altitude of 12,496m. The aircraft has a maximum range of 2,222km with four hours on station.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020
  2. hussain0216

    hussain0216 ELITE MEMBER

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    P.A.N.I.C


    Bonanza for weapons sellers, this short term panic buying by the Indians means they have very little time to negotiate any good deals

    It's just pay off the shelf prices

    Between covid and dead Indian soldiers and taking territory,, China has screwed India bad in 2020
     
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  3. FOOLS_NIGHTMARE

    FOOLS_NIGHTMARE SENIOR MEMBER

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    Just like a woman with twitchy fingers who feels solace in buying all the brand names ,India seems to have the same syndrome. An insecure nation never happy with its current abilities, always looking out for any new toy in the market.
     
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  4. Indos

    Indos PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

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    Look like the price is very expensive, I just check Harpoon block 2 missile price is 1.2 million dollar, much cheaper than this Indian deal
     
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  5. Vikram1

    Vikram1 BANNED

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    Additional 6 aircraft's were cleared in November 2019 itself. We had hit your masters that hard they need to hide causality of there soldiers.
     
  6. Vikram1

    Vikram1 BANNED

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    China used to give you so much loan still you bad mouth China?
    Well I know they just bought SU35 and S400 as they don't trust there own capability.
     
  7. FOOLS_NIGHTMARE

    FOOLS_NIGHTMARE SENIOR MEMBER

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    They produce more than 90% of their hardware and the Indians buy 90% of their hardware from abroad, i dont see any comparison.
     
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  8. Chhatrapati

    Chhatrapati BANNED

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    When you shoot someone with a Smith and Wesson does it matter if it came from your lathe or US? You shoot and kill.
     
  9. T|/|T

    T|/|T SENIOR MEMBER

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    Yeah oh how can we forget the previous panic buying spree after 27/2
     
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