What's new

Time to create Ottoman Empire 2.0

313ghazi

ELITE MEMBER
Mar 14, 2017
10,706
42
22,189
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom
Time of Empire is gone, but time of Caliphate is now. We desperately need a Muslim version of the EU/NATO. It can't happen immediately, it won't include everyone, but it needs a roadmap.
 

dBSPL

SENIOR MEMBER
Mar 2, 2018
3,750
15
10,059
Country
Turkey
Location
Turkey
Brother, I don't think any Muslim needs a caliph right now. Muslims need wealth, science and socio-cultural development. We do not need to wait for a fatwa to do this in an organized manner and in solidarity with each other.
 

SuvarnaTeja

BANNED
Oct 7, 2018
3,247
-25
1,493
Country
India
Location
India
Brother, I don't think any Muslim needs a caliph right now. Muslims need wealth, science and socio-cultural development. We do not need to wait for a fatwa to do this in an organized manner and in solidarity with each other.
We need a political unity to achieve wealth, power and development.
 

313ghazi

ELITE MEMBER
Mar 14, 2017
10,706
42
22,189
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom
Roadmap to become like Afghanistan
Yes, because thats what the EU is, unlike the land of adulturated milk and donkey biriyani that is Pakistan.

FTA between non Muslims good, between Muslims bad.
Cooperation in research and development between non Muslims good, between Muslims bad.
Alignment of regulation and laws around business and human rights between non Muslims good, between Muslims bad.
Defence cooperation between non Muslims good, between Muslims bad.
Ease of travel and exchange of human resources between non Muslims good, between Muslims bad.

Do you even know how the EU came into being?
 

SuvarnaTeja

BANNED
Oct 7, 2018
3,247
-25
1,493
Country
India
Location
India
Roadmap to become like Afghanistan
If Afghanistan did not have natural resources, no one who have cared.

Time of Empire is gone, but time of Caliphate is now. We desperately need a Muslim version of the EU/NATO. It can't happen immediately, it won't include everyone, but it needs a roadmap.
It needs to be an Islamic Union minus the Arabs.
 

313ghazi

ELITE MEMBER
Mar 14, 2017
10,706
42
22,189
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom
Brother, I don't think any Muslim needs a caliph right now. Muslims need wealth, science and socio-cultural development. We do not need to wait for a fatwa to do this in an organized manner and in solidarity with each other.
I agree.

I also think that when you have 52 nations with limited resources and each with their own shortcomings, it helps if those of us who are open to working together, do work together. The EU is an example for us to follow. We don't need to be as politically coupled, but there is a great model there for us to follow.
If Afghanistan did not have natural resources, no one who have cared.



It needs to be an Islamic Union minus the Arabs.
It should be a union of those who wish to participate only, regardless of borders.
 

SuvarnaTeja

BANNED
Oct 7, 2018
3,247
-25
1,493
Country
India
Location
India
I agree.

I also think that when you have 52 nations with limited resources and each with their own shortcomings, it helps if those of us who are open to working together, do work together. The EU is an example for us to follow. We don't need to be as politically coupled, but there is a great model there for us to follow.


It should be a union of those who wish to participate only, regardless of borders.
Unlike Turks and Persians, Arabs are in bed with US & Israel. They will join the union, spy and break it from with in. Need to keep them out.
 
Last edited:
Jan 28, 2020
2,566
-12
5,886
Country
Iran, Islamic Republic Of
Location
Netherlands
Most of the Indians consider themselves as Persians and not Turks.
LOL it gets funnier. Since when do Indians consider themselves Persian? On what basis? Only nation in South Asia that can claim to have roots to Iranian mainland is Pakistan, and a part of their population even.

@QWECXZ
in yaroo ro bebin. mige hendiye khodeshoon ro fars midunan :lol:
 

SuvarnaTeja

BANNED
Oct 7, 2018
3,247
-25
1,493
Country
India
Location
India
LOL it gets funnier. Since when do Indians consider themselves Persian? On what basis? Only nation in South Asia that can claim to have roots to Iranian mainland is Pakistan, and a part of their population even.

@QWECXZ
in yaroo ro bebin. mige hendiye khodeshoon ro fars midunan :lol:

Deccan Sultanates who ruled South India were all Persian.

 

SuvarnaTeja

BANNED
Oct 7, 2018
3,247
-25
1,493
Country
India
Location
India

Look at the names of the Rulers. They all have Shah in their names.



Ahmadnagar Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Ahmadnagar Sultanate

Painting of the Nizam Shahs

Chand Bibi, an 18th-century painting
The Ahmadnagar Sultanate was founded by Malik Ahmad Nizam Shah I, who was the son of Nizam-ul-Mulk Malik Hasan Bahri.[5]: 189  Malik Ahmad Nizam Shah I was the governor of Junnar.[1] After defeating the Bahmani army led by general Jahangir Khan on 28 May 1490, he declared independence and established dynastic rule over Ahmadnagar. The territory of the sultanate was located in the northwestern Deccan, between the sultanates of Gujarat and Bijapur. Initially, his capital was in Junnar. In 1494, the foundation was laid for the new capital of Ahmadnagar. Malik Ahmed Shah, after several attempts, secured the fortress of Daulatabad in 1499.

After Malik Ahmed Shah's death in 1510, his son Burhan, a boy of seven, was installed in his place. Burhan Shah I died in Ahmadnagar in 1553. He left six sons, of whom Hussain succeeded him. After the death of Hussain Shah I in 1565, his son Murtaza (a minor) ascended the throne. While Murtaza was a child, his mother, Khanzada Humayun Sultana, ruled as a regent for several years. Murtaza Shah annexed Berar in 1574. On his death in 1588, his son Miran Hussain ascended the throne; but his reign lasted only a little more than ten months, as he was poisoned. Ismail, a cousin of Miran Hussain was raised to the throne, but the actual power was in the hands of Jamal Khan, the leader of the Deccani group in the court. Jamal Khan was killed in the battle of Rohankhed in 1591; and soon Ismail Shah was also captured and confined by his father Burhan, who ascended the throne as Burhan Shah. After the death of Burhan Shah, his eldest son Ibrahim ascended the throne. Ibrahim Shah died only after a few months in a battle with the Bijapur Sultanate. Soon, Chand Bibi, the aunt of Ibrahim Shah, proclaimed Bahadur, the infant son of Ibrahim Shah, as the rightful Sultan; and she became regent. In 1596, a Mughal attack led by Murad was repulsed by Chand Bibi.

After the death of Chand Bibi in July 1600, Ahmadnagar was conquered by the Mughals, and Bahadur Shah was imprisoned. But Malik Ambar, and other Ahmadnagar officials, defied the Mughals and declared Murtaza Shah II as sultan in 1600 at a new capital, Paranda. Malik Ambar became prime minister and Vakil-us-Saltanat of Ahmadnagar.[10] Later, the capital was shifted first to Junnar and then to a new city Khadki (later Aurangabad). After the death of Malik Ambar, his son Fath Khan surrendered to the Mughals in 1633 and handed over the young Nizam Shahi ruler Hussain Shah, who was sent as a prisoner to the fort of Gwalior. But soon Shahaji with the assistance of Bijapur, placed an infant scion of the Nizam Shahi dynasty, Murtaza, on the throne but acted as regent. In 1636, Aurangzeb, the Mughal viceroy of Deccan, finally annexed the sultanate to the Mughal empire, after defeating Shahaji.

Rulers[edit]
  1. Malik Ahmad Nizam Shah I (1490–1510)
  2. Burhan Nizam Shah I (1510–1553)
  3. Hussain Nizam Shah I (1553–1565)
  4. Murtaza Nizam Shah I (1565–1588)
  5. Miran Nizam Hussain (1588–1589)
  6. Isma'il Nizam Shah (1589–1591)
  7. Burhan Nizam Shah II (1591–1595)
  8. Ibrahim Nizam Shah (1595–1596)
  9. Ahmad Nizam Shah II (1596)
  10. Bahadur Nizam Shah (1596–1600)
  11. Murtaza Nizam Shah II (1600–1610)
  12. Burhan Nizam Shah III (1610–1631)
  13. Hussain Nizam Shah II (1631–1633)
  14. Murtaza Nizam Shah III (1633–1636).[11]
Berar Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Berar Sultanate
The Berar Sultanate was founded by Fathullah Imad-ul-Mulk, who was born a Kannadiga Hindu, but was captured as a boy by Bahmani forces, which were on an expedition against the Vijayanagara empire, and reared as a Muslim.[5] In 1490, during the disintegration of the Bahmani Sultanate, Imad-ul-Mulk, then governor of Berar, declared independence and founded the Imad Shahi dynasty of the Berar Sultanate. He established the capital at Achalpur (Ellichpur), and Gavilgad and Narnala were also fortified by him.

Upon his death in 1504, Imad-ul-Mulk was succeeded by his eldest son, Ala-ud-din. In 1528, Ala-ud-din resisted the aggression of Ahmadnagar with help from Bahadur Shah, Sultan of Gujarat. The next ruler of Berar, Darya, first tried to ally with Bijapur, to prevent the aggression of Ahmadnagar, but was unsuccessful. Later, he helped Ahmednagar on three occasions against Bijapur. After his death in 1562, his infant son Burhan succeeded him; but in 1574 Tufal Khan, one of Burhan's ministers, usurped the throne. In the same year, Murtaza I, Sultan of Ahmadnagar, annexed Berar to his sultanate. Burhan, Tufal Khan, and Khan's son Shamshir-ul-Mulk, were taken to Ahmadnagar and confined to a fortress where all of them subsequently died.[12]

Rulers[edit]
  1. Fathullah Imad-ul-Mulk (1490–1504)
  2. Aladdin Imad Shah (1504–1530)
  3. Darya Imad Shah (1530–1562)
  4. Burhan Imad Shah (1562–1574)
  5. Tufal Khan (usurper) (1574)[12]
Bidar Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Bidar Sultanate
Bidar was the smallest of the five Deccan sultanates. Qasim Barid, founder of the Barid Shahi dynasty, joined the service of Bahmani ruler Mahmud Shah Bahmani (r. 1482–1518) as a sar-naubat (commander), and later became a mir-jumla (governor) of the Bahmani Sultanate. In 1492, he became de facto ruler of Bahmani, although Sultan Mahmud Shah Bahmani remained as the nominal ruler.

After Mahmud Shah Bahmani's death in 1504, his son Amir Barid controlled the administration of the Bahmani Sultanate. In 1528, with the flight of the last Bahmani ruler, Kalimullah, from Bidar, Amir Barid became practically an independent ruler. Amir Barid was succeeded by his son Ali Barid, who was the first to assume the title of shah. Ali Barid participated in the Battle of Talikota and was fond of poetry and calligraphy.

The last ruler of the Bidar Sultanate, Amir Barid Shah III, was defeated in 1619, and the sultanate was annexed to the Bijapur Sultanate.[13]

Rulers[edit]
  1. Qasim Barid I (1492–1504)
  2. Amir Barid I (1504–1542)
  3. Ali Barid Shah I (1542–1580)
  4. Ibrahim Barid Shah (1580–1587)
  5. Qasim Barid Shah II (1587–1591)
  6. Ali Barid Shah II (1591)
  7. Amir Barid Shah II (1591–1600)
  8. Mirza Ali Barid Shah III (1600–1609)
  9. Amir Barid Shah III (1609–1619)[11]
Bijapur Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Adil Shahi

Ibrahim Adil Shah II
Located in southwestern India, straddling the Western Ghats range of southern Maharashtra and northern Karnataka, the Bijapur Sultanate was ruled by the Adil Shahi dynasty from 1490 to 1686. The Adil Shahis were originally provincial governors of the Bahmani Sultanate; but with the break-up of the Bahmani state after 1518, Ismail Adil Shah established an independent sultanate. Ismail Adil Shah and his successors embellished the capital at Bijapur with numerous monuments.

The Adil Shahis fought the Vijayanagara Empire, which lay to the south, across the Tungabhadra River, but fought the other Deccan sultanates as well. However, the five sultanates combined forces to decisively defeat Vijayanagar at the Battle of Talikota in 1565, after which the empire broke up, Bijapur seizing control of the Raichur Doab. In 1619, the Adil Shahis conquered the neighbouring sultanate of Bidar, which was incorporated into their realm.

Later in the 17th century, the Marathas revolted successfully under Shivaji's leadership, captured major parts of the sultanate, and its capital, Bijapur. The weakened sultanate was conquered by Aurangzeb in 1686 with the fall of Bijapur, bringing the dynasty to an end.

Rulers[edit]
  1. Yusuf Adil Shah (1490–1510)
  2. Ismail Adil Shah (1510–1534)
  3. Mallu Adil Shah (1534–1535)
  4. Ibrahim Adil Shah I (1535–1558)
  5. Ali Adil Shah I (1558–1580)
  6. Ibrahim Adil Shah II (1580–1627)
  7. Mohammed Adil Shah (1627–1656)
  8. Ali Adil Shah II (1656–1672)
  9. Sikandar Adil Shah (1672–1686)[11]
Golconda Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Qutb Shahi dynasty

A manuscript depicting the painting of Abul Hasan Qutb Shah the last ruler of the Golconda Sultanate.
The dynasty's founder, Sultan Quli Qutb-ul-Mulk, migrated to Delhi from Persia with some of his relatives and friends in the beginning of the 16th century. Later he migrated south to the Deccan and served the Bahmani Sultan Mohammed Shah I. Quli Qutb-ul-Mulk conquered Golconda and became the governor of the Telangana region in 1518, after the disintegration of the Bahmani sultanate. Soon after, he declared his independence and took the title of Qutb Shah.

The dynasty ruled for 171 years, until the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb's army besieged and conquered Golconda in 1687.

Rulers[edit]
  1. Sultan Quli Qutb-ul-Mulk (1518–1543)
  2. Jamsheed Quli Qutb Shah (1543–1550)
  3. Subhan Quli Qutb Shah (1550)
  4. Ibrahim Quli Qutub Shah (1550–1580)
  5. Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah (1580–1611)
  6. Sultan Muhammad Qutb Shah (1611–1626)
  7. Abdullah Qutb Shah (1626–1672)
  8. Abul Hasan Qutb Shah (1672–1687)[14]
 
Jan 28, 2020
2,566
-12
5,886
Country
Iran, Islamic Republic Of
Location
Netherlands
Look at the names of the Rulers. They all have Shah in their names.



Ahmadnagar Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Ahmadnagar Sultanate

Painting of the Nizam Shahs

Chand Bibi, an 18th-century painting
The Ahmadnagar Sultanate was founded by Malik Ahmad Nizam Shah I, who was the son of Nizam-ul-Mulk Malik Hasan Bahri.[5]: 189  Malik Ahmad Nizam Shah I was the governor of Junnar.[1] After defeating the Bahmani army led by general Jahangir Khan on 28 May 1490, he declared independence and established dynastic rule over Ahmadnagar. The territory of the sultanate was located in the northwestern Deccan, between the sultanates of Gujarat and Bijapur. Initially, his capital was in Junnar. In 1494, the foundation was laid for the new capital of Ahmadnagar. Malik Ahmed Shah, after several attempts, secured the fortress of Daulatabad in 1499.

After Malik Ahmed Shah's death in 1510, his son Burhan, a boy of seven, was installed in his place. Burhan Shah I died in Ahmadnagar in 1553. He left six sons, of whom Hussain succeeded him. After the death of Hussain Shah I in 1565, his son Murtaza (a minor) ascended the throne. While Murtaza was a child, his mother, Khanzada Humayun Sultana, ruled as a regent for several years. Murtaza Shah annexed Berar in 1574. On his death in 1588, his son Miran Hussain ascended the throne; but his reign lasted only a little more than ten months, as he was poisoned. Ismail, a cousin of Miran Hussain was raised to the throne, but the actual power was in the hands of Jamal Khan, the leader of the Deccani group in the court. Jamal Khan was killed in the battle of Rohankhed in 1591; and soon Ismail Shah was also captured and confined by his father Burhan, who ascended the throne as Burhan Shah. After the death of Burhan Shah, his eldest son Ibrahim ascended the throne. Ibrahim Shah died only after a few months in a battle with the Bijapur Sultanate. Soon, Chand Bibi, the aunt of Ibrahim Shah, proclaimed Bahadur, the infant son of Ibrahim Shah, as the rightful Sultan; and she became regent. In 1596, a Mughal attack led by Murad was repulsed by Chand Bibi.

After the death of Chand Bibi in July 1600, Ahmadnagar was conquered by the Mughals, and Bahadur Shah was imprisoned. But Malik Ambar, and other Ahmadnagar officials, defied the Mughals and declared Murtaza Shah II as sultan in 1600 at a new capital, Paranda. Malik Ambar became prime minister and Vakil-us-Saltanat of Ahmadnagar.[10] Later, the capital was shifted first to Junnar and then to a new city Khadki (later Aurangabad). After the death of Malik Ambar, his son Fath Khan surrendered to the Mughals in 1633 and handed over the young Nizam Shahi ruler Hussain Shah, who was sent as a prisoner to the fort of Gwalior. But soon Shahaji with the assistance of Bijapur, placed an infant scion of the Nizam Shahi dynasty, Murtaza, on the throne but acted as regent. In 1636, Aurangzeb, the Mughal viceroy of Deccan, finally annexed the sultanate to the Mughal empire, after defeating Shahaji.

Rulers[edit]
  1. Malik Ahmad Nizam Shah I (1490–1510)
  2. Burhan Nizam Shah I (1510–1553)
  3. Hussain Nizam Shah I (1553–1565)
  4. Murtaza Nizam Shah I (1565–1588)
  5. Miran Nizam Hussain (1588–1589)
  6. Isma'il Nizam Shah (1589–1591)
  7. Burhan Nizam Shah II (1591–1595)
  8. Ibrahim Nizam Shah (1595–1596)
  9. Ahmad Nizam Shah II (1596)
  10. Bahadur Nizam Shah (1596–1600)
  11. Murtaza Nizam Shah II (1600–1610)
  12. Burhan Nizam Shah III (1610–1631)
  13. Hussain Nizam Shah II (1631–1633)
  14. Murtaza Nizam Shah III (1633–1636).[11]
Berar Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Berar Sultanate
The Berar Sultanate was founded by Fathullah Imad-ul-Mulk, who was born a Kannadiga Hindu, but was captured as a boy by Bahmani forces, which were on an expedition against the Vijayanagara empire, and reared as a Muslim.[5] In 1490, during the disintegration of the Bahmani Sultanate, Imad-ul-Mulk, then governor of Berar, declared independence and founded the Imad Shahi dynasty of the Berar Sultanate. He established the capital at Achalpur (Ellichpur), and Gavilgad and Narnala were also fortified by him.

Upon his death in 1504, Imad-ul-Mulk was succeeded by his eldest son, Ala-ud-din. In 1528, Ala-ud-din resisted the aggression of Ahmadnagar with help from Bahadur Shah, Sultan of Gujarat. The next ruler of Berar, Darya, first tried to ally with Bijapur, to prevent the aggression of Ahmadnagar, but was unsuccessful. Later, he helped Ahmednagar on three occasions against Bijapur. After his death in 1562, his infant son Burhan succeeded him; but in 1574 Tufal Khan, one of Burhan's ministers, usurped the throne. In the same year, Murtaza I, Sultan of Ahmadnagar, annexed Berar to his sultanate. Burhan, Tufal Khan, and Khan's son Shamshir-ul-Mulk, were taken to Ahmadnagar and confined to a fortress where all of them subsequently died.[12]

Rulers[edit]
  1. Fathullah Imad-ul-Mulk (1490–1504)
  2. Aladdin Imad Shah (1504–1530)
  3. Darya Imad Shah (1530–1562)
  4. Burhan Imad Shah (1562–1574)
  5. Tufal Khan (usurper) (1574)[12]
Bidar Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Bidar Sultanate
Bidar was the smallest of the five Deccan sultanates. Qasim Barid, founder of the Barid Shahi dynasty, joined the service of Bahmani ruler Mahmud Shah Bahmani (r. 1482–1518) as a sar-naubat (commander), and later became a mir-jumla (governor) of the Bahmani Sultanate. In 1492, he became de facto ruler of Bahmani, although Sultan Mahmud Shah Bahmani remained as the nominal ruler.

After Mahmud Shah Bahmani's death in 1504, his son Amir Barid controlled the administration of the Bahmani Sultanate. In 1528, with the flight of the last Bahmani ruler, Kalimullah, from Bidar, Amir Barid became practically an independent ruler. Amir Barid was succeeded by his son Ali Barid, who was the first to assume the title of shah. Ali Barid participated in the Battle of Talikota and was fond of poetry and calligraphy.

The last ruler of the Bidar Sultanate, Amir Barid Shah III, was defeated in 1619, and the sultanate was annexed to the Bijapur Sultanate.[13]

Rulers[edit]
  1. Qasim Barid I (1492–1504)
  2. Amir Barid I (1504–1542)
  3. Ali Barid Shah I (1542–1580)
  4. Ibrahim Barid Shah (1580–1587)
  5. Qasim Barid Shah II (1587–1591)
  6. Ali Barid Shah II (1591)
  7. Amir Barid Shah II (1591–1600)
  8. Mirza Ali Barid Shah III (1600–1609)
  9. Amir Barid Shah III (1609–1619)[11]
Bijapur Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Adil Shahi

Ibrahim Adil Shah II
Located in southwestern India, straddling the Western Ghats range of southern Maharashtra and northern Karnataka, the Bijapur Sultanate was ruled by the Adil Shahi dynasty from 1490 to 1686. The Adil Shahis were originally provincial governors of the Bahmani Sultanate; but with the break-up of the Bahmani state after 1518, Ismail Adil Shah established an independent sultanate. Ismail Adil Shah and his successors embellished the capital at Bijapur with numerous monuments.

The Adil Shahis fought the Vijayanagara Empire, which lay to the south, across the Tungabhadra River, but fought the other Deccan sultanates as well. However, the five sultanates combined forces to decisively defeat Vijayanagar at the Battle of Talikota in 1565, after which the empire broke up, Bijapur seizing control of the Raichur Doab. In 1619, the Adil Shahis conquered the neighbouring sultanate of Bidar, which was incorporated into their realm.

Later in the 17th century, the Marathas revolted successfully under Shivaji's leadership, captured major parts of the sultanate, and its capital, Bijapur. The weakened sultanate was conquered by Aurangzeb in 1686 with the fall of Bijapur, bringing the dynasty to an end.

Rulers[edit]
  1. Yusuf Adil Shah (1490–1510)
  2. Ismail Adil Shah (1510–1534)
  3. Mallu Adil Shah (1534–1535)
  4. Ibrahim Adil Shah I (1535–1558)
  5. Ali Adil Shah I (1558–1580)
  6. Ibrahim Adil Shah II (1580–1627)
  7. Mohammed Adil Shah (1627–1656)
  8. Ali Adil Shah II (1656–1672)
  9. Sikandar Adil Shah (1672–1686)[11]
Golconda Sultanate[edit]
Main article: Qutb Shahi dynasty

A manuscript depicting the painting of Abul Hasan Qutb Shah the last ruler of the Golconda Sultanate.
The dynasty's founder, Sultan Quli Qutb-ul-Mulk, migrated to Delhi from Persia with some of his relatives and friends in the beginning of the 16th century. Later he migrated south to the Deccan and served the Bahmani Sultan Mohammed Shah I. Quli Qutb-ul-Mulk conquered Golconda and became the governor of the Telangana region in 1518, after the disintegration of the Bahmani sultanate. Soon after, he declared his independence and took the title of Qutb Shah.

The dynasty ruled for 171 years, until the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb's army besieged and conquered Golconda in 1687.

Rulers[edit]
  1. Sultan Quli Qutb-ul-Mulk (1518–1543)
  2. Jamsheed Quli Qutb Shah (1543–1550)
  3. Subhan Quli Qutb Shah (1550)
  4. Ibrahim Quli Qutub Shah (1550–1580)
  5. Muhammad Quli Qutb Shah (1580–1611)
  6. Sultan Muhammad Qutb Shah (1611–1626)
  7. Abdullah Qutb Shah (1626–1672)
  8. Abul Hasan Qutb Shah (1672–1687)[14]
Yes, we Persianized Indians because of our invasion of India (Nader Shah) but Indians,the majority of them, themselves apart from culture did not magically become Persian. It is true that Iranian soldiers mixed with Indian women but it was not on a massive scale. So what you are claiming is mainly cultural. Your first post implied that Indians have Persian/Iranic blood.
 

dBSPL

SENIOR MEMBER
Mar 2, 2018
3,750
15
10,059
Country
Turkey
Location
Turkey

This map probably represents the apex of muslim world in political terms. Three great empires depicted here, but there were other Muslim states, which were very powerful militarily and economically, around these empires.

But I just want to show you what happened in 2 centuries after:



The Islamic world was completely shattered. Dozens of today's states have turned into colonial lands, still many Muslim people have not gained their independence.

How did we get to this point and why are the sons of this glorious history struggling to develop again today? The question is quite rational and the answer should be sought in rational places.
 

SuvarnaTeja

BANNED
Oct 7, 2018
3,247
-25
1,493
Country
India
Location
India
Yes, we Persianized Indians because of our invasion of India (Nader Shah) but Indians,the majority of them, themselves apart from culture did not magically become Persian. It is true that Iranian soldiers mixed with Indian women but it was not on a massive scale. So what you are claiming is mainly cultural. Your first post implied that Indians have Persian/Iranic blood.
Yes. All Hindus Woman either married Turks or Persians hence all Indians today have Turkish or Persian blood.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom