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THE SAUDI SAVAGERY: Kingdom Beheads 16-Year-Old For Sending Whatsapp Message

Ceylal

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written by tyler durden
saturday april 27, 2019UK's The Sun tabloid. Abdulkareem al-Hawaj was just just 16 when he was arrested. Just a schoolboy at the time, he was detained and accused of being a "terrorist" for sending texts online about an anti-government demonstration.

Before making his 'confession', Abdulkareem, a Shiite Muslim who was 21 at the time of his execution, was reportedly brutally tortured. With his hands chained above his head, he was beaten and electrocuted. Amnesty International denounced his trial as a farce, since he was denied access to proper defense counsel.

Police also reportedly threatened to kill his family if he didn't confess to his crimes.

But Abdulkareem wasn't the only man executed this week over seemingly minor offenses committed when he was a teenager. Mujtaba al-Sweikat, was a teenager who was set to begin his studies at Western Michigan University when he was arrested for attending an anti-government protest.

Then just 17 years old, Sweikat was badly beaten after his arrest, including being repeatedly bludgeoned on the soles of his feet,before he "confessed" to crimes against the state.

Human rights organizations said he was tortured and convicted during a "sham trial." His university tried to intervene, insisting that he had 'great promise', but the government ignored their protests.

Harriet McCulloch, deputy director of Reprieve, a human rights organization, insisted both young men were killed for sharing information about a peaceful anti-government protest.Many things can be used to justify a death sentence in Mohammed Bin Salman's Saudi Arabia, including 'disobedience against the King,'

'preparing banners with anti-state slogans' and 'incitement via social media' are also offenses that potentially carry the weight of death.

Mujtaba al-Sweikat and Abdulkarim al-Hawaj were teenagers sharing information about peaceful protests on their mobile phones. Saudi Arabia's western allies must act now, to prevent any more young people being killed for exercising their right to freedom of expression.Another young man, Munir al-Adam, was just 23, when he was arrested in 2012 at a government checkpoint. During his interrogation, his feet were so badly beaten that he was forced to crawl for days. After losing hearing in one of his ears, he was rendered completely deaf after the horrific torture.

He told a judge that he agreed to sign the confession because he was exhausted by the brutal and relentless torture.

The 37 murders were carried out in Riyadh, the Muslim holy cities of Mecca and Medina, central Qassim province and in the Eastern Province, the home of the Shiite minority. After being beheaded, one of the men was reportedly crucified, and his body was put on display as a message to other would-be dissidents.

That message? This is what could happen to you and your loved ones if you dare speak out against the crown.

Reprinted with permission from ZeroHedge.

http://www.ronpaulinstitute.org/arc...eads-16-year-old-for-sending-whatsapp-message
 

HAIDER

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written by tyler durden
saturday april 27, 2019UK's The Sun tabloid. Abdulkareem al-Hawaj was just just 16 when he was arrested. Just a schoolboy at the time, he was detained and accused of being a "terrorist" for sending texts online about an anti-government demonstration.

Before making his 'confession', Abdulkareem, a Shiite Muslim who was 21 at the time of his execution, was reportedly brutally tortured. With his hands chained above his head, he was beaten and electrocuted. Amnesty International denounced his trial as a farce, since he was denied access to proper defense counsel.

Police also reportedly threatened to kill his family if he didn't confess to his crimes.

But Abdulkareem wasn't the only man executed this week over seemingly minor offenses committed when he was a teenager. Mujtaba al-Sweikat, was a teenager who was set to begin his studies at Western Michigan University when he was arrested for attending an anti-government protest.

Then just 17 years old, Sweikat was badly beaten after his arrest, including being repeatedly bludgeoned on the soles of his feet,before he "confessed" to crimes against the state.

Human rights organizations said he was tortured and convicted during a "sham trial." His university tried to intervene, insisting that he had 'great promise', but the government ignored their protests.

Harriet McCulloch, deputy director of Reprieve, a human rights organization, insisted both young men were killed for sharing information about a peaceful anti-government protest.Many things can be used to justify a death sentence in Mohammed Bin Salman's Saudi Arabia, including 'disobedience against the King,'

'preparing banners with anti-state slogans' and 'incitement via social media' are also offenses that potentially carry the weight of death.

Mujtaba al-Sweikat and Abdulkarim al-Hawaj were teenagers sharing information about peaceful protests on their mobile phones. Saudi Arabia's western allies must act now, to prevent any more young people being killed for exercising their right to freedom of expression.Another young man, Munir al-Adam, was just 23, when he was arrested in 2012 at a government checkpoint. During his interrogation, his feet were so badly beaten that he was forced to crawl for days. After losing hearing in one of his ears, he was rendered completely deaf after the horrific torture.

He told a judge that he agreed to sign the confession because he was exhausted by the brutal and relentless torture.

The 37 murders were carried out in Riyadh, the Muslim holy cities of Mecca and Medina, central Qassim province and in the Eastern Province, the home of the Shiite minority. After being beheaded, one of the men was reportedly crucified, and his body was put on display as a message to other would-be dissidents.

That message? This is what could happen to you and your loved ones if you dare speak out against the crown.

Reprinted with permission from ZeroHedge.

http://www.ronpaulinstitute.org/arc...eads-16-year-old-for-sending-whatsapp-message
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...informants-decried-as-orwellian-idUSKCN1BO1K9

one of reason i have adviced my Pakistani brother who are working there, becareful in Saudi Arabia and avoid all social media apps..... you never know, your one wrong sentence against govt policy can land you in jail or killed
 
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Philip the Arab

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written by tyler durden
saturday april 27, 2019UK's The Sun tabloid. Abdulkareem al-Hawaj was just just 16 when he was arrested. Just a schoolboy at the time, he was detained and accused of being a "terrorist" for sending texts online about an anti-government demonstration.

Before making his 'confession', Abdulkareem, a Shiite Muslim who was 21 at the time of his execution, was reportedly brutally tortured. With his hands chained above his head, he was beaten and electrocuted. Amnesty International denounced his trial as a farce, since he was denied access to proper defense counsel.

Police also reportedly threatened to kill his family if he didn't confess to his crimes.

But Abdulkareem wasn't the only man executed this week over seemingly minor offenses committed when he was a teenager. Mujtaba al-Sweikat, was a teenager who was set to begin his studies at Western Michigan University when he was arrested for attending an anti-government protest.

Then just 17 years old, Sweikat was badly beaten after his arrest, including being repeatedly bludgeoned on the soles of his feet,before he "confessed" to crimes against the state.

Human rights organizations said he was tortured and convicted during a "sham trial." His university tried to intervene, insisting that he had 'great promise', but the government ignored their protests.

Harriet McCulloch, deputy director of Reprieve, a human rights organization, insisted both young men were killed for sharing information about a peaceful anti-government protest.Many things can be used to justify a death sentence in Mohammed Bin Salman's Saudi Arabia, including 'disobedience against the King,'

'preparing banners with anti-state slogans' and 'incitement via social media' are also offenses that potentially carry the weight of death.

Mujtaba al-Sweikat and Abdulkarim al-Hawaj were teenagers sharing information about peaceful protests on their mobile phones. Saudi Arabia's western allies must act now, to prevent any more young people being killed for exercising their right to freedom of expression.Another young man, Munir al-Adam, was just 23, when he was arrested in 2012 at a government checkpoint. During his interrogation, his feet were so badly beaten that he was forced to crawl for days. After losing hearing in one of his ears, he was rendered completely deaf after the horrific torture.

He told a judge that he agreed to sign the confession because he was exhausted by the brutal and relentless torture.

The 37 murders were carried out in Riyadh, the Muslim holy cities of Mecca and Medina, central Qassim province and in the Eastern Province, the home of the Shiite minority. After being beheaded, one of the men was reportedly crucified, and his body was put on display as a message to other would-be dissidents.

That message? This is what could happen to you and your loved ones if you dare speak out against the crown.

Reprinted with permission from ZeroHedge.

http://www.ronpaulinstitute.org/arc...eads-16-year-old-for-sending-whatsapp-message
Eh... he is Shia.
 

Hiraa

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It is against the law to say/write against the saudi govt. or royal family. Thats the first thing we learned when I went to saudi arabia when I was 8 years ols. Survived 18 years with minding my own business and back home now.

The law has nothing to do with shia or sunni or wahabi. Its just the law that the country follows VERY very seriously.
 

Philip the Arab

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Than again its their country, and their rules. If they want to do something they can do it freely. F*ck those HRO bullshit NGOs.

So it is OK..You are talking about subhumans and their culture of blood...and you find a way to see it as a normal distraction..
The country is Sunni majority. Of course the minority will be oppressed. It happens in America and around the world.

These people were trying to start a revolution in Saudi Arabia and therefor were given reasonable punishment. Its called being a traitor and is fair.
 

The SC

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Than again its their country, and their rules. If they want to do something they can do it freely. F*ck those HRO bullshit NGOs.


The country is Sunni majority. Of course the minority will be oppressed. It happens in America and around the world.

These people were trying to start a revolution in Saudi Arabia and therefor were given reasonable punishment. Its called being a traitor and is fair.
Most of these are Sunnis.. so it is not about minorities .. it is about the law of the land.. and in KSA it is Sharia'..
 
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Than again its their country, and their rules. If they want to do something they can do it freely. F*ck those HRO bullshit NGOs.


The country is Sunni majority. Of course the minority will be oppressed. It happens in America and around the world.

These people were trying to start a revolution in Saudi Arabia and therefor were given reasonable punishment. Its called being a traitor and is fair.

Ur a schoolkid and you are here to say what is fair? Your favorite Kurds got gassed en masse, tell your Kurdish friends it was fair for siding with Iran during a war.
 

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