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The Gunpowder Empires 2.0

Jan 22, 2018
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~ The 21st Century Gunpowder Empires ~
How Turks are attempting to take back control of the Muslim world from Arabs
By Ancient Pakistan Facebook Page



The policies of Turkey over the past few years have been very noteworthy. For the first time since the establishment of the modern Turkish republic, leadership in that country seems less interested in Europe and more interested in reclaiming its lost Ottoman prestige. For non-Arab Muslim states like Pakistan, Iran and even Egypt this has been a welcomed initiative – for decades the region has witnessed incompetent Arab leaders stumble time and time again with one stupid decision and policy after another. Their policies over the past 100 years have single-handedly reduced the Muslim world to where it is today…a backwater, uneducated, ridiculed group of people who have no respect in the world. In short, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan isn’t having it anymore. A “neo-Ottomanism” seems to be spreading in Turkey and Erdogan seems keen to push this “neo-Ottomanism” beyond its borders into the territories of the former “Gunpower Empires”. For those who are well versed in history, you’ll understand where and why this Turkish push is coming from. For those who are not, keep reading and you'll be surprised about how this has never been mentioned in any of our history books.

~The Ottomans, Safavids & Mughuls~
In the 15th and 16th centuries, three great powers arose in a band across western and southern Asia. The Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires established control over Asia Minor (Turkey, Arabia & Balkans), Persia (Iran, Azerbaijan & Afghanistan), and South Asia (Pakistan & India) respectively through commerce and mystical movements (ie. Sufism). Each of these three empires also had considerable military successes using newly developed firearms, especially cannon and small arms. While some differences existed between the three empires, the rulers nonetheless encouraged and sponsored widespread inter-empire commercial activities, and provided an infrastructure of bazaars and caravans as well as the establishment and implementation of common and state law. By the end of the 16th century, the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughul empires formed a vast commercial zone and in general the Muslim world was quite stable and "self-sufficient" in some ways. What’s also very common among all three empires was their disdain and distrust of Arab leaders. The Umayyad and Abbasid empires between the 5th and 8th centuries were still reminiscent to non-Arab Muslims of the three empires and played a big role in how Ottomans, Safavids and Mughuls viewed Arabs in general.

~Umayyad & Abbasid Arab empires~
The Umayyad’s ruled over much of the Muslim world during the 5th century; this included non-Arab territories like Turkey, Iran and Pakistan. During this period, the Umayyad’s ruled with cruelty, tyranny and hypocrisy which is very much reminiscent of today’s modern Arab nation states. There were many reasons for the downfall of Umayyads – monarchy became a norm after the demise of Muawiya and the traditional caliphate was essentially abandoned. By the end, non-Arab Muslims in the empire viewed the Umayyad’s as an Arab empire rather than a Muslim empire. Other problems such as ineligible rulers and an absence of a definite law and order did not help matters. Arab rulers also employed racial discrimination, which many say was the biggest cause of the Umayyad’s downfall. During the early caliphates, colour, race, and nationality were of no concern in running the empire. Arab leaders during that period shared power with non-Arab leaders. But when monarchical absolutism was introduced during Umayyad rule, Arab leaders began discriminating non-Arabs. Abdul Malik went as far as to remove all non-Arabs from main positions in government. This behaviour would have a lasting impact for hundreds of years to come and eventually led to the Abbasid Revolution of 750. The Abbasid period was marked by reliance on non-Arab Muslim bureaucrats (notably the Persian Barmakid family) to govern the territories conquered by Arab Muslims, as well as an increasing inclusion of non-Arab Muslims in the ummah. Persianate customs were broadly adopted by the ruling elite, and they started supporting artists and scholars. Baghdad became a center of science, culture, philosophy and invention during the Golden Age of Islam. Despite this initial cooperation, the Abbasids of the late 8th century had eventually alienated the non-Arab majority. They were forced to cede authority of Morocco to the Idrisid dynasty, Ifriqiya to the Aghlabids, and Egypt to the Shi'ite Caliphate of the Fatimids. The political power of Abbasids largely ended with the rise of the Persian Buyids and the Seljuq Turks in ~1100. By the 15th century, the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughul empires rose and took over much of the Muslim world. Although hundreds of years had elapsed, the distrust of Arabs remained among leaders of all 3 empires. The Mughuls were not known for publicly expressing this disdain for Arabs, but the Ottomans and particularly the Safavids were. Indeed, over the last decade, the term “Safavid” has become a commonly used derogatory word among Arab leaders for the Iranians.

~21st century~
There is no question that Turkey wants to reestablish itself in the Muslim world today and in particular the Middle East, where the Ottomans thrived. Under Ottoman rule, the Middle East was at relative peace – Mecca and Medina were under direct Turkish rule and a significant attempt was made to establish a loose “Pan-Islamic” empire. Under the three “Gunpowder Empires”, outside interference was almost non-existent in the Muslim world, as compared to today. Powerful Muslim empires kept the greedy Europeans at bay. Of course, not all things are meant to last. Eventually the Mughul and Safavid empires collapsed towards the 1700s, with the Ottomans surviving until the early 20th century. As usual, the Arabs once again reminded all of us there true nature. A revolt was officially initiated by Sherif Hussein bin Ali at Mecca on 10 June 1916 although his sons ‘Ali and Faisal had already initiated operations at Medina starting on 5 June with the aim of removing Ottoman Turks from the Arab territories. The Arabs enlisted the help of the famous Thomas Edward Lawrence or “Lawrence of Arabia” and together with British help they removed the Ottomans from the Arab territories stretching from Yemen to Syria. The British also helped revive Wahabism and helped establish the modern-day House of Saud based in Riyadh today. This Arab revolt had a huge impact on the national psyche of the Turks, including one Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. To this day, the Turks have never forgotten this betrayal and may infact be fueling Turkey's ambitions today.

Fast-forward 100 years later...Turkey is at the forefront in supporting the Rohingya people and Kashmir movement. Turkey is pivoting away from NATO and EU and engaging more with Russia and China. Most importantly, Turkey is heavily engaging with its traditional allies Iran and Pakistan. 10 or 15 years ago, this would have been only a dream. Erdogan indeed seems to be pushing a “neo-Ottomanism”. It remains to be seen how Turkey will be able to handle the Arab leadership (the Gulf Sheikhs) who will no doubt resist any Turkish aggressiveness, and one can easily note that increased number of terrorist attacks occurring in Turkey by ISIS. Coincidence?

This is a personal view that I have written based on my knowledge of history. I look forward to reading alternative views or views that may not align with mine.
 
Jan 22, 2018
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Do you have anything useful to contribute? If not, please jog on.
It's okay. If you read the Rig Veda, it'll tell you all about the people of Ganga. The Vedas tell us of the people of Ganga being untrustworthy, traitorous and in general being troublemakers. They were referred to as "Dasyu" and the land of Ganga was called "Dasyuvarta" in the Vedas.

Indra (a Vedic god) would normally attack and destroy "Dasyupurahs" to protect the Vedic clans and kingdoms of the Indus.

:)
 

MBT 3000

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hmmm great that i already can a lot of history about them and the muslim world. and more than that
 

TMA

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Sep 7, 2015
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~ The 21st Century Gunpowder Empires ~
How Turks are attempting to take back control of the Muslim world from Arabs
By Ancient Pakistan Facebook Page



The policies of Turkey over the past few years have been very noteworthy. For the first time since the establishment of the modern Turkish republic, leadership in that country seems less interested in Europe and more interested in reclaiming its lost Ottoman prestige. For non-Arab Muslim states like Pakistan, Iran and even Egypt this has been a welcomed initiative – for decades the region has witnessed incompetent Arab leaders stumble time and time again with one stupid decision and policy after another. Their policies over the past 100 years have single-handedly reduced the Muslim world to where it is today…a backwater, uneducated, ridiculed group of people who have no respect in the world. In short, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan isn’t having it anymore. A “neo-Ottomanism” seems to be spreading in Turkey and Erdogan seems keen to push this “neo-Ottomanism” beyond its borders into the territories of the former “Gunpower Empires”. For those who are well versed in history, you’ll understand where and why this Turkish push is coming from. For those who are not, keep reading and you'll be surprised about how this has never been mentioned in any of our history books.

~The Ottomans, Safavids & Mughuls~
In the 15th and 16th centuries, three great powers arose in a band across western and southern Asia. The Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires established control over Asia Minor (Turkey, Arabia & Balkans), Persia (Iran, Azerbaijan & Afghanistan), and South Asia (Pakistan & India) respectively through commerce and mystical movements (ie. Sufism). Each of these three empires also had considerable military successes using newly developed firearms, especially cannon and small arms. While some differences existed between the three empires, the rulers nonetheless encouraged and sponsored widespread inter-empire commercial activities, and provided an infrastructure of bazaars and caravans as well as the establishment and implementation of common and state law. By the end of the 16th century, the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughul empires formed a vast commercial zone and in general the Muslim world was quite stable and "self-sufficient" in some ways. What’s also very common among all three empires was their disdain and distrust of Arab leaders. The Umayyad and Abbasid empires between the 5th and 8th centuries were still reminiscent to non-Arab Muslims of the three empires and played a big role in how Ottomans, Safavids and Mughuls viewed Arabs in general.

~Umayyad & Abbasid Arab empires~
The Umayyad’s ruled over much of the Muslim world during the 5th century; this included non-Arab territories like Turkey, Iran and Pakistan. During this period, the Umayyad’s ruled with cruelty, tyranny and hypocrisy which is very much reminiscent of today’s modern Arab nation states. There were many reasons for the downfall of Umayyads – monarchy became a norm after the demise of Muawiya and the traditional caliphate was essentially abandoned. By the end, non-Arab Muslims in the empire viewed the Umayyad’s as an Arab empire rather than a Muslim empire. Other problems such as ineligible rulers and an absence of a definite law and order did not help matters. Arab rulers also employed racial discrimination, which many say was the biggest cause of the Umayyad’s downfall. During the early caliphates, colour, race, and nationality were of no concern in running the empire. Arab leaders during that period shared power with non-Arab leaders. But when monarchical absolutism was introduced during Umayyad rule, Arab leaders began discriminating non-Arabs. Abdul Malik went as far as to remove all non-Arabs from main positions in government. This behaviour would have a lasting impact for hundreds of years to come and eventually led to the Abbasid Revolution of 750. The Abbasid period was marked by reliance on non-Arab Muslim bureaucrats (notably the Persian Barmakid family) to govern the territories conquered by Arab Muslims, as well as an increasing inclusion of non-Arab Muslims in the ummah. Persianate customs were broadly adopted by the ruling elite, and they started supporting artists and scholars. Baghdad became a center of science, culture, philosophy and invention during the Golden Age of Islam. Despite this initial cooperation, the Abbasids of the late 8th century had eventually alienated the non-Arab majority. They were forced to cede authority of Morocco to the Idrisid dynasty, Ifriqiya to the Aghlabids, and Egypt to the Shi'ite Caliphate of the Fatimids. The political power of Abbasids largely ended with the rise of the Persian Buyids and the Seljuq Turks in ~1100. By the 15th century, the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughul empires rose and took over much of the Muslim world. Although hundreds of years had elapsed, the distrust of Arabs remained among leaders of all 3 empires. The Mughuls were not known for publicly expressing this disdain for Arabs, but the Ottomans and particularly the Safavids were. Indeed, over the last decade, the term “Safavid” has become a commonly used derogatory word among Arab leaders for the Iranians.

~21st century~
There is no question that Turkey wants to reestablish itself in the Muslim world today and in particular the Middle East, where the Ottomans thrived. Under Ottoman rule, the Middle East was at relative peace – Mecca and Medina were under direct Turkish rule and a significant attempt was made to establish a loose “Pan-Islamic” empire. Under the three “Gunpowder Empires”, outside interference was almost non-existent in the Muslim world, as compared to today. Powerful Muslim empires kept the greedy Europeans at bay. Of course, not all things are meant to last. Eventually the Mughul and Safavid empires collapsed towards the 1700s, with the Ottomans surviving until the early 20th century. As usual, the Arabs once again reminded all of us there true nature. A revolt was officially initiated by Sherif Hussein bin Ali at Mecca on 10 June 1916 although his sons ‘Ali and Faisal had already initiated operations at Medina starting on 5 June with the aim of removing Ottoman Turks from the Arab territories. The Arabs enlisted the help of the famous Thomas Edward Lawrence or “Lawrence of Arabia” and together with British help they removed the Ottomans from the Arab territories stretching from Yemen to Syria. The British also helped revive Wahabism and helped establish the modern-day House of Saud based in Riyadh today. This Arab revolt had a huge impact on the national psyche of the Turks, including one Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. To this day, the Turks have never forgotten this betrayal and may infact be fueling Turkey's ambitions today.

Fast-forward 100 years later...Turkey is at the forefront in supporting the Rohingya people and Kashmir movement. Turkey is pivoting away from NATO and EU and engaging more with Russia and China. Most importantly, Turkey is heavily engaging with its traditional allies Iran and Pakistan. 10 or 15 years ago, this would have been only a dream. Erdogan indeed seems to be pushing a “neo-Ottomanism”. It remains to be seen how Turkey will be able to handle the Arab leadership (the Gulf Sheikhs) who will no doubt resist any Turkish aggressiveness, and one can easily note that increased number of terrorist attacks occurring in Turkey by ISIS. Coincidence?

This is a personal view that I have written based on my knowledge of history. I look forward to reading alternative views or views that may not align with mine.
What do you think bout Muslim-Orthodox Christian relations, past, present and future?
 

Jugger

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Nov 17, 2016
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Their policies over the past 100 years have single-handedly reduced the Muslim world to where it is today…a backwater, uneducated, ridiculed group of people who have no respect in the world.
I agree with this 100%
I sometimes think some Arab leaders lack basic common sense.
They make the most stupid decisions possible.
 

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