What's new

THE GULF RISING: Defense Industrialization in Saudi Arabia and the UAE

singlefighter

FULL MEMBER
May 11, 2016
365
-2
326
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Ground reality is second largest company of the construction world is almost collapse i mean bin ladin group and saudi oger also collapse labour is waiting for food in lines masjid e haram works stopped due to lack of funds harmain high speed rail project is also stop saudi govt is in talks with world bank and IMF for bailout package otherwise they might default and that default will also put last nail in petrodollar's coffin so usa also want to save Ksa from economic downfall all these things happens in just war hysteria of new king salman and his son's hate for iran Allah save ummah from these dajali slaves
 

The SC

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 13, 2012
29,526
21
31,664
Country
Canada
Location
Canada
Sir, then why are the F15's being flown in from the US? As far as I know, maybe they have the capability to be repaired, but being built from scratch, I don't think so, but you could provide evidence to back up your claim.
Just 2 were upgraded to F-15-SA in the US to train Saudis on the upgrade process, another 2 were new F-15SA totally built in the US, some 67 F-15S will be upgraded in KSA while another brand new 82 F-15SA will be delivered to KSA by 2019, 22 months later than scheduled..
 
Last edited:

Zarvan

ELITE MEMBER
Apr 28, 2011
53,454
87
62,954
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Executive Summary

Because of their sizeable financial resources, close relations with Washington, and privileged access to the top transatlantic defense companies, Saudi Arabia and the UAE are in a unique position to explore opportunities and make important strides in the military-industrial domain that other countries can simply ill-afford to make.
Moreover,over the past decade, globalization and the information technology (IT) revolution in military naffairs (RMA) have opened up the international defense market and made it less exclusive, allowing Saudi Arabia and the UAE to overcome some of the key scientific and technological challenges that accompany the building and sustaining of indigenous defense industries.
For Saudi Arabia and the UAE, the creation of modern military industries that could compete in the international defense market promotes a set of domestic and foreign policy interests. Both countries seek to develop their arms manufacturing capabilities to address a range of perceived internal and external national security threats, reduce their political dependence on the United States and other influential powers that dominate the global defense market, diversify their economies, affirm their regional status and prestige, enhance their military credibility, and finally augment their diplomatic leverage.
Self-sufficiency is not a realistic goal for Saudi Arabia and the UAE. But in some limited security and defense areas, including spare parts, ammunition, and potentially shipbuilding (for the UAE), both countries have made steps forward. In addition, they now design, manufacture, and modernize military vehicles, communication and electronic systems, and unmanned systems including drones. They have also significantly upgraded their maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) capabilities in the aerospace industry.
Because of Saudi and Emirati improvement in such capabilities, the old adage of “Arabs don’t do maintenance” no longer reflects reality.
Furthermore, both countries’ military personnel have drastically enhanced their military training and competency and can now operate some of the most sophisticated weapons systems. They have also steadily increased their defense spending as part of their gross domestic product (GDP) and successfully absorbed some technology transfers.
The development of strategic partnerships with Washington, London, and Paris and some of the leading global defense firms over the years has offered Saudi Arabia and the UAE the opportunity to aggressively pursue defense industrialization. But out of all enabling factors, it is unquestionably both countries’ large and sophisticated offset programs, which have emphasized technology transfer, that have contributed the most to
their effort to develop their indigenous defense capabilities. Saudi Arabia and the UAE are projected to be among the top twenty global military offset markets for the next decade. Through these offset programs, Saudi Arabia and the UAE have been able to connect their domestic defense sectors with global defense producers and enable them to acquire basic industrial knowledge and know-how. The results are mixed but in some areas encouraging, as a number of indigenous industries have been established in Riyadh, Abu Dhabi,
and other locations in joint ventures with global defense industry giants.
Yet these accomplishments notwithstanding, embarking on a successful path to domestic military industrialization could, depending on the desired objectives, require nothing short of a total state effort and a societal transformation.
Political stability, national leadership, and relative abundance of financial capital in Saudi Arabia and the UAE have been crucial to getting military industrialization off the ground, but to develop, rationalize, and sustain the process for the long term both countries stand a better chance of succeeding if they implement the following set of recommendations:

Clarity of Purpose and Strategy:

Saudi and Emirati military industrialization must have a more precise strategic and tactical purpose.
High-tech and small-scale is the best way forward for both countries, but Saudi Arabia and the UAE ought to think more seriously about ways to effectively integrate the process of local arms production into the broader context of national defense policy and arms acquisition.

Defense Production Policy:

Riyadh and Abu Dhabi must formulate clear defense production policies and create overarching bodies for long-term defense planning. This is important for consistency between short-term decisions and
long-term plans.

Organization of Defense:

Riyadh and Abu Dhabi must organize their national defense establishments by creating credible and
authoritative institutions as well as solid legal and administrative frameworks. If defense ministries in Riyadh and Abu Dhabi assume key defense-related powers and refrain from relegating them to kings or military
commanders, military industrialization would profit.

Technology Transfer:

A diverse approach to technology transfer that addresses actual needs and realities would be most beneficial to Saudi Arabia and the UAE. Riyadh and Abu Dhabi should continue to adopt a deliberate policy of
training their nationals and encouraging them to learn skills on the job.

Research & Development and Science & Technology:

Saudi Arabia and the UAE should develop a more robust local R&D capability that would have more direct interaction with the users—the armed forces and foreign clients. But advances in R&D have to correspond to
S&T levels in user organizations. Both countries should also create more dynamic linkages between science institutions (universities, parks, institutes, etc.,) and the defense industry.

Private Sector Participation:

Saudi Arabia and the UAE need to ensure a greater role for the private sector in funding the enterprise of
military industrialization. Otherwise defense production would remain wholly state-owned, which works against the streamlining of defense industrial activity.

Offset Programs:

Saudi Arabia and the UAE should further integrate their offset programs into national strategies for industrial
development. In order to reduce their dependency on external technology suppliers, both countries must maximize the effect of job creation.

Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul:

Because Saudi and Emirati technicians and engineers, as few as they are, are still unable to maintain
modern US and other Western weapons systems without the help of foreign workers, further focus on and investment in MRO capabilities is needed in Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

Bilateral or GCC-wide Military Industrial Cooperation:

Saudi Arabia and the UAE would benefit from developing a joint MRO base and an integrated or complementary services and production infrastructure. This would be hugely profitable economically, as it would allow for maximal exchange of experience and skills, as well as fuller, more prolonged use of facilities
and qualified manpower. Implications for US Policy Efforts by Saudi Arabia and the UAE over the past decade to upgrade their national defense capabilities by purchasing arms and pursuing domestic military industrialization contribute to US strategic plans and interests in the Middle East and are generally consistent with the broader US commitment to expanding its global partnerships and strengthening its friends and allies’ defense capabilities. However, should current political uncertainties in US-Gulf relations persist and, more dramatically, a strategic rift between Washington and Riyadh develop in the future due to major policy differences, intensified defense industrialization in the Gulf could carry risks to US strategic interests in the Middle East.
One of the motivations of Saudi Arabia and the UAE to pursue military industrialization is to reduce their political dependence on the United States. Unilateralism on the part of US friends and allies can sometimes undermine security interests, as evidenced by Israel’s unilateral military actions in Lebanon, Syria, and the Palestinian Territories.
The United States has often favored and called for regional solutions to many of the Middle East’s security problems, and Washington would be relieved if Saudi Arabia and/or the UAE could step up and use their own defense and diplomatic resources to defuse a potential crisis in the future.
However, if another major crisis, a la 1990-91 Gulf War, occurs and the Saudis and/or the Emiratis decide to act on their own to protect their interests outside the confines of the US-Gulf partnership, US strategic interests might be at risk.
While Saudi Arabia’s current capacity to act more independently from the United States is lower, its
willingness will only increase should relations with Washington fail to improve and its defense industrialization effort develop at a more rapid pace. This equation is almost reversed with the UAE. Abu Dhabi’s capacity to act more independently from the United States is higher (its armed forces are more technically proficient and
combat-ready than the Saudi military) and will only strengthen with time, but its willingness to do so is decreased because it has a stable relationship with Washington and much prefers to work with US-led, international coalitions. This explains why Abu Dhabi is interested in strengthening its partnership with NATO and vice versa. Like Saudi Arabia, the UAE has regional leadership ambitions, but it seeks to lead by example, and its foreign policy outlook tends to be more global and cosmopolitan than Saudi Arabia’s.
The sustainability of the US-Gulf partnership is a joint responsibility, despite Washington’s senior status. The Arab Gulf countries, and Saudi Arabia and the UAE in particular, have obligations too.
Building closer security relationships and integrating national defense capabilities (most importantly in air and missile defense, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) should be more pressing priorities for Arab Gulf leaders. Interoperability is also not a one-way street. Washington has been adamant about
its Gulf partners maintaining compatibility with US defense systems. However, often times, when these partners request the purchase of US items that would uphold US-GCC and inter-GCC interoperability, their requests are denied by The sustainability of the US-Gulf partnership is a joint responsibility, despite
Washington’s senior status.
The Arab Gulf countries, and Saudi Arabia and the UAE in particular, have obligations too. Building closer security relationships and integrating national defense capabilities (most importantly in air and missile defense, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) should be more pressing priorities for Arab Gulf
leaders. Interoperability is also not a one-way street. Washington has been adamant about its Gulf partners maintaining compatibility with US defense systems. However, often times, when these partners request the purchase of US items that would uphold US-GCC and inter-GCC interoperability, their requests are denied by
Washington. The two major reasons for this are strict export controls and a US Israel policy of Qualitative Military Edge (QME), which is designed to maintain Israel’s regional military supremacy and uphold its deterrence posture. In the Gulf partners’ view, the problem is not limited to US rejection but also to Washington’s slow or lacking response. Sometimes it takes years to get an answer from Washington for a specific military purchase, and by the time a response is provided the price as well as the needs and circumstances of the Gulf partners would have changed.
But Saudi Arabia and the UAE shouldn’t rely solely on US cooperation. There is ample room for defense-industrial cooperation and collaboration between Riyadh and Abu Dhabi and other GCC capitals, be it in manpower, skilled expertise, manufacturing and/or MRO, that can address some deficiencies. The problem is that politics, rivalry, and prestige have stood in the way of such a goal. The United States has been pushing the GCC to think more collectively for some time, but disagreements among its members, be it on Syria,
Egypt, or Iran, are real. So long as political discord reigns in the GCC, the US-Gulf partnership, with its defense-industrial component, will never meet its true potential and remain limited to bilateral
affairs between the United States and individual GCC members.

Conclusion

Military industrialization in Saudi Arabia and the UAE is a natural consequence of both countries’ ambitions to affirm their rising regional status as well as their efforts over the years to modernize their societies and diversify their economies. The pace, scope, and effectiveness of Saudi and Emirati military industrialization efforts will continue to depend, in many respects, on broader societal change in both countries. But it would be misleading to say that the Saudi and Emirati political systems, because of their restrictive attributes—including secrecy, excessive centralization, exclusionism, corruption, and lack of accountability—totally obstruct military industrialization. What matters most when it comes to successful military industrialization
is intent, vision, resources, and a set of sound political, economic, and military industrial strategies.
Saudi Arabia and the UAE still struggle with the formulation of such strategies, but they are gradually improving and learning from the top defense companies in the world, by way of collaboration and partnership.
It bears repeating that military industrialization in Saudi Arabia and the UAE is a long-term process. Indeed, it is likely to take anywhere between five to fifteen years before either country can effectively export military items en masse and increasingly rely on its own local manpower and arms production capabilities to address national security needs. But Riyadh and Abu Dhabi are careful not to rush the process, and they have
every reason to be confident about the future.

https://www.files.ethz.ch/isn/182154/The_Gulf_Rising.pdf

This is a long and comprehensive paper on the subject of the thread (you can follow the link to the full pdf). It is a 2012 paper and many things have moved on since..Also bear in mind that this article concerns the Defense industrialization with the USA, there are also other paths taken by KSA and the UAE, Like China, South Korea,, Ukraine, Turkey and Pakistan, to name a few..
Any more inputs are welcome..

KSA needs to get everything with TOT. What ever they can get from Europe and USA and Russia with TOT they should get it. First producing latest weapons with TOT would also help them design there own products in future.
@Khafee
 

Khafee

BANNED
Oct 9, 2015
7,687
63
27,582
Country
United Arab Emirates
Location
Saudi Arabia
Just 2 were upgraded to F-16-SA in the US to train Saudis on the upgrade process, another 2 were new F-15SA totally built in the US, some 67 F-15S will be upgraded in KSA while another brand new 82 F-15SA will be delivered to KSA by 2019, 22 months later than scheduled..
Sir, thank you.

82 will be built in the US
67 will be ungraded. - The Saudi contribution will be restricted to plug and play, thats it. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Regards

KSA needs to get everything with TOT. What ever they can get from Europe and USA and Russia with TOT they should get it. First producing latest weapons with TOT would also help them design there own products in future.
@Khafee

Bhai Sahab, ToT is not easy. For getting ToT you have to pay through your nose, and even then it comes with serious limitations. Nonetheless if you have an industrial base it is easier to absorb technology and build on it. In todays world doing it independently is nearly impossible unless you are US or Russia, you need JV's and serious R&D to get something credible. They are going in the right direction, but need to increase their speed.
 

The SC

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 13, 2012
29,526
21
31,664
Country
Canada
Location
Canada
Sir, thank you.

82 will be built in the US
67 will be ungraded. - The Saudi contribution will be restricted to plug and play, thats it. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Regards



.
Thanks, corrected, was typing in the dark..

It is not sure it is a plug and play, too many modifications and new systems are involved.. the fly-by-wire alone can give you an idea of the scope of the modifications that will be done by Saudis
 

Khafee

BANNED
Oct 9, 2015
7,687
63
27,582
Country
United Arab Emirates
Location
Saudi Arabia
Thanks, corrected, was typing in the dark..

It is not sure it is a plug and play, too many modifications and new systems are involved.. the fly-by-wire alone can give you an idea of the scope of the modifications that will be done by Saudis
What about FBW for the F-15's, made by KSA? What are you high on?
 

Khafee

BANNED
Oct 9, 2015
7,687
63
27,582
Country
United Arab Emirates
Location
Saudi Arabia
Not really sure if you lack the information or just a false flager pretending to be a UAE citizen. JSYK, Saudi Arabia has currently managed to convert F-15 into F-15SA stander from A to Z. Cant post url for some reason.
Why don't you copy and paste the articles?
 

UAE

BANNED

New Recruit

Jan 7, 2017
14
0
21
Country
United Arab Emirates
Location
United Arab Emirates
Why don't you copy and paste the articles?



السلام السعودية تفوز بعقد تحويل طائرات F-15S إلى طائرات F-15SA

2013-10-11 القوات الجوية 0



فريق التحرير

حققت شركة السلام السعودية للطيران الرائدة في مجال أعمال صيانة وتعديل الطائرات والخدمات الفنية المساندة في منطقة الشرق الأوسط، إنجازاً جديداً في مجال عقود التسليح العالمية.

فقد وقعت الشركة عقداً ثابت السعر بقيمة 33 مليون دولار مع شركة بوينغ لتطوير منشأة التثبيت وتنفيذها، ووضع خطط التصنيع والجداول الزمنية التي يدعمها تخطيط المشاريع، وإصدار التقارير المتعلقة بالأدوات المؤتمتة لطائرات أف 15 أس (F-15S)المحوّلة إلى طائرات أف 15 أس إيه (F-15SA) السعودية.

سيؤمن المتعاقد بموجب هذا العقد جميع الموظفين والمعدات والأدوات وغيرها من التجهيزات التي لا تؤمنها بالضرورة وكالات حكومية أميركية.[*]

يهدف هذا البرنامج إلى تحويل 70 طائرة (F-15S)إلى 70 F-15SA (السعودية) المبنية ضمن خط الإنتاج الأساسي.

وخلال المرحلة الأولى، سيتم تحويل طائرتين، وسيتم تنفيذ العمل في منشأة بوينغ في سانت لويس، ميسوري.

وبعد الانتهاء من المرحلة الأولى، سيتم استئناف عملية الإنتاج في إطار المرحلة الثانية من هذا العقد في الرياض لاستكمال الـ68 طائرة المتبقية.

ومن المتوقع أن تكتمل المرحلة الأولى من المشروع بحلول 31 كانون الأول/ ديسمبر 2015، مع إتمام المشروع بكامله في 31 كانون الأول/ ديسمبر 2019.

تشمل التحسينات التي أضيفت على طائرة F-15SA، نظام إلكتروني للتحكم بالطيران، ونظام حرب إلكترونية رقمي، بالإضافة إلى نظام تعقب وبحث عامل بالأشعة دون الحمراء من نوع إيه أن / أي أس أس – 42 (AN/***-42)من إنتاج شركة لوكهيد مارتن، ورادار المسح الإلكتروني النشط من طرازAPG-63(v)3.

لقد تم تجهيز قمرتي القيادة الأمامية والخلفية بنظام خوذة الطيار JHMCS تشير للصاروخ للاتجاه نحو هدف جوي في اتجاه معاكس، من خارج البؤرةالبصرية الخاصة به.

وستكون الطائرة السعودية مزودة بأسلحة متطوّرة مثل صواريخ هارم (HARM) وAIM-9X SIDWINDER و صواريخ أمرام (AMRAAM) جو- جو المتوسطة المدى المتقدم AIM-120C-7، وقنابل Payeway II الموجّهة بواسطة بالليزر زنة 500 رطل إنكليزي، وقنابل جدام (JDAM) الموجّهة الدقيقة وحواضن إستطلاع.

يشار إلى أنّ القوات الجوية الملكية السعودية قد دشنت في أيار/مايو من العام الجاري أول طائرة لها من طراز أف 15 إس إيه ( F-15SA) في احتفال أقيم في مقر شركة بوينغ للصناعات العسكرية (Boeing)، بمقرها في مدينة سانت لويس بولاية ميسوري الأميركية.

وكانت شركة بوينغ قد أخرجت مقاتلة F-15SA السعودية إلى العلن للمرة الأولى في 30 نيسان/ أبريل 2013، واعتبر ذلك حقبة جديدة في قدرات مقاتلات المملكة العربية السعودية وجاهزيتها.

وأتت عملية التدشين هذه، ضمن خطط القوات الجوية السعودية لتحديث أسطولها من المقاتلات، إيذاناً بدخول عصر جديد في قدرة طائراتها المقاتلة، مما يضعها في مقدمة القوات الجوية عالمياً.

وكانت شركة لوكهيد مارتن (Lockheed Martin) الأميركية قد أعلنت أنها حازت على عقد بقيمة 253 مليون دولار أميركي للبدء في توريد نظم تدريب الطيارين على مقاتلات F-15SAوكذلك أنظمة الصيانة لصالح القوات الجوية الملكية السعودية. يشار إلى أّن هذه الاتفاقية أتت ضمن التزام الشركة بدعم جهود القوات الجوية السعودية الرامية إلى توفير بيئة تدريب شاملة على برامج التدريب والصيانة لمقاتلات أف 15.

ويسمح النظام التدريبي هذا للطيارين بإجراء مناورات جوية، وتنفيذ علميات جو- أرض، وإجراء عمليات جوية أثناء الالتحام، وكذلك الدخول في مناورات تكتيكية، وذلك من خلال مشّبه تدريب للمهام المتكاملة بإطار 360 درجة.

ويعتبر مشبّه التدريب هذا الأول من نوعه بالنسبة لمقاتلات F-15، إذ يتميّز بقبة واحدة لقمرة الطيار المزدوجة المقاعد من أجل تعزيز التدريب على التعاون بين الطيارين أثناء الطيران. وبحسب الاتفاقية أيضاً، ستقوم لوكهيد مارتن بتزويد أجهزة تدريب على القذف من قمرة القيادة، وتجهيزات تدريب من خلال جهاز الكمبيوتر.

والجدير بالذكر، أن مقاتلة F-15SA هي النموذج المشتق الأحدث ضمن مقاتلات F-15 المبرهنة قتالياً.

وتتميز مقاتلة F-15 SA عن مقاتلات F-15 الأخرى بكونها تستعمل محرك F-110- GE-129 من General Electric عكس طائرات الF-15E Strike Eagle الامريكية التي تستعمل محركات F100-PW-229 من شركة Pratt & Whitney ورادار AN/APG-63 (v)3 الذي يعتبر راداراً من فئة رادار المسح الإلكتروني النشط AESA النسخة السعودية سوف تستعمل حاضن الاستهداف المتطوّر من نوع Sniper XR.

تجدر الإشارة إلى أنّ شركة السلام للطيران تعمل على توفير خدمات شاملة ومتكاملة للطائرات المدنية والعسكرية وطائرات كبار الشخصيات، على كافة أنواعها، فقد تم تكليفها أيضاً بتصنيع جانح طائرة F-15، وكل هذا يؤدي إلى إعادة التوازن الاقتصادي للمملكة العربية السعودية.

كما تشمل هذه الخدمات أيضاً خبرات صيانة الطائرات المدنية والعسكرية، بما في ذلك برامج المساندة الفنية الميدانية لتشغيل وصيانة الطائرات.

تعد شركة السلام السعودية المركز الوحيد المرخص من شركة بوينغ الأميركية لتصليحات فترة الضمان الخاصة بطائرات بوينغ (Boeing) لرجال الأعمال في منطقة الشرق


إنتاج وطني سعودي: السلام للطائرات تسلّم أول قمرة قيادة لمقاتلة أف-15





سلّمت شركة “السلام للطائرات” (AlSalam Aircraft) أول منتج وطني “مقدمة مقاتلة أف-15” لشركة بوينج ضمن برنامج تحويل طائرة أف-15 أس (F-15S) إلى “أف-15 أس أي” (F-15SA). وأعلنت الشركة في 11 آب/أغسطس على صفحتها الرسمية على تويتر “السلام تفتخر بتسليم أول منتج كإنجاز وطني من تصنيع مقدمة طائرة أف١٥ لشركة بوينغ ضمن برنامج تحويل طائرة أف١٥ S إلى أف١٥ SA”.

هذا وأثبتت شركة السلام للطائرات وجودها في قطاع الطيران وحققت الكثير من أهدافها، وأصبح للمملكة العربية السعودية اليوم قدرة وطنية على تلبية احتياجات طائراتها صيانةً وتعديلاً وتحديثاً، هذا فضلاً على تحقيق مساهمة الشركة في الجانب الاقتصادي والاجتماعي والعديد من الأهداف الأخرى المصاحبة.
 

Khafee

BANNED
Oct 9, 2015
7,687
63
27,582
Country
United Arab Emirates
Location
Saudi Arabia
Not really sure if you lack the information or just a false flager pretending to be a UAE citizen. JSYK, Saudi Arabia has currently managed to convert F-15 into F-15SA stander from A to Z. Cant post url for some reason.

Do you even realize what you have said, and what you have quoted?

السلام السعودية تفوز بعقد تحويل طائرات F-15S إلى طائرات F-15SA

2013-10-11 القوات الجوية 0



فريق التحرير

حققت شركة السلام السعودية للطيران الرائدة في مجال أعمال صيانة وتعديل الطائرات والخدمات الفنية المساندة في منطقة الشرق الأوسط، إنجازاً جديداً في مجال عقود التسليح العالمية.

فقد وقعت الشركة عقداً ثابت السعر بقيمة 33 مليون دولار مع شركة بوينغ لتطوير منشأة التثبيت وتنفيذها، ووضع خطط التصنيع والجداول الزمنية التي يدعمها تخطيط المشاريع، وإصدار التقارير المتعلقة بالأدوات المؤتمتة لطائرات أف 15 أس (F-15S)المحوّلة إلى طائرات أف 15 أس إيه (F-15SA) السعودية.

سيؤمن المتعاقد بموجب هذا العقد جميع الموظفين والمعدات والأدوات وغيرها من التجهيزات التي لا تؤمنها بالضرورة وكالات حكومية أميركية.[*]

يهدف هذا البرنامج إلى تحويل 70 طائرة (F-15S)إلى 70 F-15SA (السعودية) المبنية ضمن خط الإنتاج الأساسي.

وخلال المرحلة الأولى، سيتم تحويل طائرتين، وسيتم تنفيذ العمل في منشأة بوينغ في سانت لويس، ميسوري.

وبعد الانتهاء من المرحلة الأولى، سيتم استئناف عملية الإنتاج في إطار المرحلة الثانية من هذا العقد في الرياض لاستكمال الـ68 طائرة المتبقية.

ومن المتوقع أن تكتمل المرحلة الأولى من المشروع بحلول 31 كانون الأول/ ديسمبر 2015، مع إتمام المشروع بكامله في 31 كانون الأول/ ديسمبر 2019.

تشمل التحسينات التي أضيفت على طائرة F-15SA، نظام إلكتروني للتحكم بالطيران، ونظام حرب إلكترونية رقمي، بالإضافة إلى نظام تعقب وبحث عامل بالأشعة دون الحمراء من نوع إيه أن / أي أس أس – 42 (AN/***-42)من إنتاج شركة لوكهيد مارتن، ورادار المسح الإلكتروني النشط من طرازAPG-63(v)3.

لقد تم تجهيز قمرتي القيادة الأمامية والخلفية بنظام خوذة الطيار JHMCS تشير للصاروخ للاتجاه نحو هدف جوي في اتجاه معاكس، من خارج البؤرةالبصرية الخاصة به.

وستكون الطائرة السعودية مزودة بأسلحة متطوّرة مثل صواريخ هارم (HARM) وAIM-9X SIDWINDER و صواريخ أمرام (AMRAAM) جو- جو المتوسطة المدى المتقدم AIM-120C-7، وقنابل Payeway II الموجّهة بواسطة بالليزر زنة 500 رطل إنكليزي، وقنابل جدام (JDAM) الموجّهة الدقيقة وحواضن إستطلاع.

يشار إلى أنّ القوات الجوية الملكية السعودية قد دشنت في أيار/مايو من العام الجاري أول طائرة لها من طراز أف 15 إس إيه ( F-15SA) في احتفال أقيم في مقر شركة بوينغ للصناعات العسكرية (Boeing)، بمقرها في مدينة سانت لويس بولاية ميسوري الأميركية.

وكانت شركة بوينغ قد أخرجت مقاتلة F-15SA السعودية إلى العلن للمرة الأولى في 30 نيسان/ أبريل 2013، واعتبر ذلك حقبة جديدة في قدرات مقاتلات المملكة العربية السعودية وجاهزيتها.

وأتت عملية التدشين هذه، ضمن خطط القوات الجوية السعودية لتحديث أسطولها من المقاتلات، إيذاناً بدخول عصر جديد في قدرة طائراتها المقاتلة، مما يضعها في مقدمة القوات الجوية عالمياً.

وكانت شركة لوكهيد مارتن (Lockheed Martin) الأميركية قد أعلنت أنها حازت على عقد بقيمة 253 مليون دولار أميركي للبدء في توريد نظم تدريب الطيارين على مقاتلات F-15SAوكذلك أنظمة الصيانة لصالح القوات الجوية الملكية السعودية. يشار إلى أّن هذه الاتفاقية أتت ضمن التزام الشركة بدعم جهود القوات الجوية السعودية الرامية إلى توفير بيئة تدريب شاملة على برامج التدريب والصيانة لمقاتلات أف 15.

ويسمح النظام التدريبي هذا للطيارين بإجراء مناورات جوية، وتنفيذ علميات جو- أرض، وإجراء عمليات جوية أثناء الالتحام، وكذلك الدخول في مناورات تكتيكية، وذلك من خلال مشّبه تدريب للمهام المتكاملة بإطار 360 درجة.

ويعتبر مشبّه التدريب هذا الأول من نوعه بالنسبة لمقاتلات F-15، إذ يتميّز بقبة واحدة لقمرة الطيار المزدوجة المقاعد من أجل تعزيز التدريب على التعاون بين الطيارين أثناء الطيران. وبحسب الاتفاقية أيضاً، ستقوم لوكهيد مارتن بتزويد أجهزة تدريب على القذف من قمرة القيادة، وتجهيزات تدريب من خلال جهاز الكمبيوتر.

والجدير بالذكر، أن مقاتلة F-15SA هي النموذج المشتق الأحدث ضمن مقاتلات F-15 المبرهنة قتالياً.

وتتميز مقاتلة F-15 SA عن مقاتلات F-15 الأخرى بكونها تستعمل محرك F-110- GE-129 من General Electric عكس طائرات الF-15E Strike Eagle الامريكية التي تستعمل محركات F100-PW-229 من شركة Pratt & Whitney ورادار AN/APG-63 (v)3 الذي يعتبر راداراً من فئة رادار المسح الإلكتروني النشط AESA النسخة السعودية سوف تستعمل حاضن الاستهداف المتطوّر من نوع Sniper XR.

تجدر الإشارة إلى أنّ شركة السلام للطيران تعمل على توفير خدمات شاملة ومتكاملة للطائرات المدنية والعسكرية وطائرات كبار الشخصيات، على كافة أنواعها، فقد تم تكليفها أيضاً بتصنيع جانح طائرة F-15، وكل هذا يؤدي إلى إعادة التوازن الاقتصادي للمملكة العربية السعودية.

كما تشمل هذه الخدمات أيضاً خبرات صيانة الطائرات المدنية والعسكرية، بما في ذلك برامج المساندة الفنية الميدانية لتشغيل وصيانة الطائرات.

تعد شركة السلام السعودية المركز الوحيد المرخص من شركة بوينغ الأميركية لتصليحات فترة الضمان الخاصة بطائرات بوينغ (Boeing) لرجال الأعمال في منطقة الشرق


إنتاج وطني سعودي: السلام للطائرات تسلّم أول قمرة قيادة لمقاتلة أف-15





سلّمت شركة “السلام للطائرات” (AlSalam Aircraft) أول منتج وطني “مقدمة مقاتلة أف-15” لشركة بوينج ضمن برنامج تحويل طائرة أف-15 أس (F-15S) إلى “أف-15 أس أي” (F-15SA). وأعلنت الشركة في 11 آب/أغسطس على صفحتها الرسمية على تويتر “السلام تفتخر بتسليم أول منتج كإنجاز وطني من تصنيع مقدمة طائرة أف١٥ لشركة بوينغ ضمن برنامج تحويل طائرة أف١٥ S إلى أف١٥ SA”.

هذا وأثبتت شركة السلام للطائرات وجودها في قطاع الطيران وحققت الكثير من أهدافها، وأصبح للمملكة العربية السعودية اليوم قدرة وطنية على تلبية احتياجات طائراتها صيانةً وتعديلاً وتحديثاً، هذا فضلاً على تحقيق مساهمة الشركة في الجانب الاقتصادي والاجتماعي والعديد من الأهداف الأخرى المصاحبة.
 

The SC

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 13, 2012
29,526
21
31,664
Country
Canada
Location
Canada
What about FBW for the F-15's, made by KSA? What are you high on?
So you just plug and play an FBW on an airplane that does not have one? It was one example, if it was the radar, I could understand your so and so answer, I didn't expect a dumb answer like that from a "military professional" or any professional as a matter of fact.. maybe you were high on something, if not give a detailed technical answer!
And for military professional.what is your rank and expertise? which branch are you from?
Empty answers like that will give a bad name to the Military profession in the Arab world and elsewhere, hope you do not do it on purpose, people expect a sound answer with facts and sources, especially from a :" Professional "
 
Last edited:

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom