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The evil in our midst

T-Faz

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Feb 16, 2010
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“The Taliban are trying to purify our culture, they are trying to re-establish a purist Islamic culture and tradition,” a young middle class IT professional explained to me in Toronto in 1996. What worried me then was that this person was not a Taliban madrasah graduate living in Pakistan but a professional living in and enjoying the fruits of the “decadent” West. I remembered an earlier ideology based on purification of culture which gave us the horrors of the Holocaust.

No doubt that the Taliban’s success in moving from madrasah to military movement stemmed from the corruption and violence in the mainstream society that preceded them. The people were simply tired of the status quo and willing to accept new leadership, despite its promises of certain austerities and purist doctrines that deviated from established custom. History has many examples of simple ideologies peddled by uncompromising men which quickly perpetuate themselves.

However, the present day Taliban cannot be described as an idealistic student led movement that had tried to bring order to a chaotic Afghanistan in 1990s. They have shown remarkable resilience in bouncing back from defeat after being driven from power in Afghanistan after 9/11; they are seen as representing the so-called national resistance of over forty million Pashtun against foreign “invasion” and “occupation”. In the process, the Taliban have become a sophisticated military, terror and propaganda machine branching out to key provinces in Pakistan.

The master Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels said “the most brilliant propagandist technique will yield no success unless one fundamental principle is borne in mind constantly – it must confine itself to a few points and repeat them over and over”. The Taliban and their global sympathizers have succeeded in perfecting and delivering a potent short and simple message on the Taliban’s fight for truth and justice against the evil NATO forces and their Pakistani mercenaries. This message is parroted incessantly by mostly pliant Pakistani mainstream politicians, academics and media persons who have become cheerleaders or at least apologists for the Taliban.

Goebbels also stated that “whoever can conquer the street will one day conquer the state: for every form of power politics and any dictatorship-run state has its roots in the street.” We know that Pakistan, where the extremist Islamic parties control the streets, is clearly first prize for the Taliban; its nuclear weapons a bonus to blackmail the world. While anarchic Afghanistan served as the social engineering nursery for the Taliban, Pakistan is intended as its graduate school with considerable global consequences.

“Not possible”, many would say; well Hitler’s Third Reich could only be considered a madman’s dream in 1919 when the National Socialists started with only 2000 members. The Nazi ideology prospered in the chaos of the democratic Weimer Republic which resulted from the humiliation of the Treaty of Versailles which brought an end to Imperial Germany. The Taliban are prospering and enjoying safe haven in Pakistan because the nation’s democracy, following in the footsteps of yet another dictatorship, is insecure and corrupt: its strings pulled by an increasingly uneasy security establishment.

After the recent Bin Laden and Karachi naval base incidents, Pakistanis are wondering whether their security forces have the capacity or will to protect the nation’s sovereignty and win the war against the Taliban. The Taliban are growing bolder in this defeatist environment, hoping that Pakistan withdraws from the “war on terror” as demanded by many of its leaders as if it were the panacea for the plague of domestic terrorism. It would strengthen the Taliban agenda if Pakistan becomes internationally isolated, forcing the U.S. and its allies to put boots on the ground to fight terror in Pakistan.

It would be very shortsighted and irresponsible for the U.S. and the West to walk away from Pakistan at this critical stage due to the Bin Laden episode as some U.S. lawmakers are suggesting. Letting the Pakistanis choke on their own Taliban stew may feel good for a while, but letting down a basically decent and tolerant people struggling to establish a democratic society against great odds would be unwise. Working with Pakistan‘s nascent democracy politically and militarily to defeat the Taliban is an absolute imperative at this time.

http://pakteahouse.net/2011/06/02/the-evil-in-our-midst/
 

T-Rex

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“The Taliban are trying to purify our culture, they are trying to re-establish a purist Islamic culture and tradition,” a young middle class IT professional explained to me in Toronto in 1996. What worried me then was that this person was not a Taliban madrasah graduate living in Pakistan but a professional living in and enjoying the fruits of the “decadent” West. I remembered an earlier ideology based on purification of culture which gave us the horrors of the Holocaust.

No doubt that the Taliban’s success in moving from madrasah to military movement stemmed from the corruption and violence in the mainstream society that preceded them. The people were simply tired of the status quo and willing to accept new leadership, despite its promises of certain austerities and purist doctrines that deviated from established custom. History has many examples of simple ideologies peddled by uncompromising men which quickly perpetuate themselves.

However, the present day Taliban cannot be described as an idealistic student led movement that had tried to bring order to a chaotic Afghanistan in 1990s. They have shown remarkable resilience in bouncing back from defeat after being driven from power in Afghanistan after 9/11; they are seen as representing the so-called national resistance of over forty million Pashtun against foreign “invasion” and “occupation”. In the process, the Taliban have become a sophisticated military, terror and propaganda machine branching out to key provinces in Pakistan.

The master Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels said “the most brilliant propagandist technique will yield no success unless one fundamental principle is borne in mind constantly – it must confine itself to a few points and repeat them over and over”. The Taliban and their global sympathizers have succeeded in perfecting and delivering a potent short and simple message on the Taliban’s fight for truth and justice against the evil NATO forces and their Pakistani mercenaries. This message is parroted incessantly by mostly pliant Pakistani mainstream politicians, academics and media persons who have become cheerleaders or at least apologists for the Taliban.

Goebbels also stated that “whoever can conquer the street will one day conquer the state: for every form of power politics and any dictatorship-run state has its roots in the street.” We know that Pakistan, where the extremist Islamic parties control the streets, is clearly first prize for the Taliban; its nuclear weapons a bonus to blackmail the world. While anarchic Afghanistan served as the social engineering nursery for the Taliban, Pakistan is intended as its graduate school with considerable global consequences.

“Not possible”, many would say; well Hitler’s Third Reich could only be considered a madman’s dream in 1919 when the National Socialists started with only 2000 members. The Nazi ideology prospered in the chaos of the democratic Weimer Republic which resulted from the humiliation of the Treaty of Versailles which brought an end to Imperial Germany. The Taliban are prospering and enjoying safe haven in Pakistan because the nation’s democracy, following in the footsteps of yet another dictatorship, is insecure and corrupt: its strings pulled by an increasingly uneasy security establishment.

After the recent Bin Laden and Karachi naval base incidents, Pakistanis are wondering whether their security forces have the capacity or will to protect the nation’s sovereignty and win the war against the Taliban. The Taliban are growing bolder in this defeatist environment, hoping that Pakistan withdraws from the “war on terror” as demanded by many of its leaders as if it were the panacea for the plague of domestic terrorism. It would strengthen the Taliban agenda if Pakistan becomes internationally isolated, forcing the U.S. and its allies to put boots on the ground to fight terror in Pakistan.

It would be very shortsighted and irresponsible for the U.S. and the West to walk away from Pakistan at this critical stage due to the Bin Laden episode as some U.S. lawmakers are suggesting. Letting the Pakistanis choke on their own Taliban stew may feel good for a while, but letting down a basically decent and tolerant people struggling to establish a democratic society against great odds would be unwise. Working with Pakistan‘s nascent democracy politically and militarily to defeat the Taliban is an absolute imperative at this time.

The evil in our midst | Pak Tea House

As you talk about 'nascent democracy', let me ask you a question, will you accept a democratically elected Islamic government? Will you let people vote if you find out that most are going to vote for an Islamic party? Do you accept the fact that if people have the right to elect a pro-western government they also have the right to elect an Islamic government? Most secular gentlemen like you won't even go that far to even contemplate the idea of allowing the people to vote as they wish. They invite despots or american friends to intervene in their favour.
And that is the greatest evil in 'our midst'.
 

Shabz Nist

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Look, even as a Muslim i am against the idea of installing an Islamic system of governance anywhere in the world. There is clearly, no future with such a system. Islam has been misinterpreted so many times that any system of governance based on it will be unstable. Democracy is the way forward and church must always remain separate from state.

In India we have a very effective system of governance in place. The fact that it held its ground in an extremely diverse country such as India is in itself a testament to its effectiveness. I understand Pakistan does not wish to be associated with anything "india". But my question is....if it works, why not adopt it?
 

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