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The 2010 FIFA World Cup!

ice_man

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lol... you're right... I think Umpire love Whistle & Yellow Card.... :rofl: :D

:rofl:bro its not umpire it is referee!! i don't know why even some of my friends when ghana got the PENALTY they called it plenty corner!!(clearly from hockey & it is PENALTY not plenty)!!!

& it is also ARGENTINA not ARGENTINE :lol: love the desi lines of football!!
 

Moin91

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:rofl:bro its not umpire it is referee!! i don't know why even some of my friends when ghana got the PENALTY they called it plenty corner!!(clearly from hockey & it is PENALTY not plenty)!!!

& it is also ARGENTINA not ARGENTINE :lol: love the desi lines of football!!

my mistake.... Thanks for correction... :)
 

game over

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Jul 10, 2010
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:rofl:bro its not umpire it is referee!! i don't know why even some of my friends when ghana got the PENALTY they called it plenty corner!!(clearly from hockey & it is PENALTY not plenty)!!!

& it is also ARGENTINA not ARGENTINE :lol: love the desi lines of football!!

gigling is not allowed :thinktank::hang2::mod::mod:
 

baker

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Octopus Paul Died.........................




























































Some One asked Octopus to predict "when india will win WorldCup"..

Octopus Paul had a heart attack because of continuous laugh after hearing this query....



ps:just a SMS joke , thought to share with u guys...
 
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Skies

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Adil Najam

Unlike the 2006 FIFA World Cup, when Pakistan was represented in each and every game of the world’s premier sporting tournament – in the shape of Pakistani manufactured footballs – Pakistan will be missing in action at the 2010 FIFA Football World Cup that starts in South Africa later this week. This year’s official match football for the World Cup – Jabulani or Jo’bulani (manufactured by Adidas and meaning ‘to celebrate’ in Zulu – will come from China, not Pakistan.
jabulani-adidas.jpg

Pakistani footballs, of course, have a long history of being kicked around in Football World Cup tournaments. From the iconic Telstar (which was the first designated official game ball, at the 1970 Mexico World Cup and then at the 1974 World Cup in Germany) to the even more iconic Tango (the official ball of the 1978 and 1982 World Cups in Argentina and Spain), and even at the last World Cup in 2006 in Germany, hand-stitched, high-performance from Pakistan – really from Sialkot – have been the preferred choice for Adidas, the official providers of match balls to the FIFA World Cups.

No longer so, it seems. Indeed, from once commanding as much as 85% of the world’s market in footballs, Pakistani manufacturers now believe that they will supply no more than 30-40 percent of the footballs sold around this mega-event. Pakistan, of course, is not a football power at all – ranked 165th out of 202 countries in the world. But like everywhere else, football fever can get high in Pakistan too (here and here). This year, however, we would no longer be kicked around on the FIFA World Cup soccer fields.

This should be read not just as a matter of national pride, but as yet another sign of the changing global economic landscape, Pakistan’s sliding economic fortunes, and a need to focus more deeply on Pakistan’s enterprise-level economic structures than we often do.

The most commonly cited reason for Pakistan’s dwindling football fortunes is the use of child labor in the football industry. Even though the practice is now far less than it used to be, there are still instances of it and the stigma has lingered. In this particular case, technology may also have a lot to do with it. The new ball is being described in technological rather than craft terms: “The newly developed “Grip’n’Groove” profile provides the best players in the world with a ball allowing an exceptionally stable flight and perfect grip under all conditions. Comprising only eight, completely new, thermally bonded 3-D panels, which for the first time are spherically molded, the ball is perfectly round and even more accurate than ever before.” And, of course, Pakistan’s security situation also must have had some impact in perceptions.

More detail: http://pakistaniat.com/2010/06/09/pakistan-football-world-cup-jabulani/




World Cup replica balls made on less than £2 a day

A report being launched on Monday by the International Labor Rights Forum brings to light the plight of football stitchers who are at the very bottom of football’s multi-billion pound empire. Adidas, which makes replicas of the official World Cup football, the “Jabulani”, in the world’s football-making capital, Sialkot, is targeting £1.2 billion sales this year. Meanwhile some of Sialkot’s stitchers, who make 70 per cent of the world’s hand-stitched footballs, say they do not earn enough to feed their children.

One worker, who said it took two and a half hours to stitch each ball for Adidas at the Forward Sports factory, explained he could earn a maximum of £2 a day when the plant was at full capacity. Most days he earned less.
“I’m trying to get a better job,” he said, speaking on condition of anonymity in a house in Sialkot’s backstreets, where barefoot children played beside open drains. “The problem is that unemployment is so high the bosses know we have no choice and can pay us less.”

Over half of the 218 workers surveyed by ILRF stated that they did not make the legal minimum wage per month. “This has been going on for 15 years – companies are choosing to be ignorant about it,” said Trina Tocco, ILRF’s deputy director. “We spoke to workers earning less than 80p a day while companies make huge profits. It’s unacceptable.”

Fairtrade, the organisation that works to improve conditions for exploited workers, endorses several plants in Sialkot. But last month it halted production of Fairtrade balls at a factory run by Talon. It is believed workers in this factory were being paid less than the minimum wage.

Adidas states its stitching centre workers earn a minimum of 231 rupees (£1.85) a day. This means if they work a six-day week, they just make the monthly minimum wage of 6,000 rupees - less than £50.

This is half the recognised “living wage” of 12,000 rupees - established by civil society and non-governmental organisations in Pakistan and internationally, including ILRF - for a family to be able to afford education for their children, rent, electricity and food.

Production of Adidas replica balls in Sialkot has increased by five times since December because of the World Cup, with a maximum daily production capacity of 25,000. “The person making the Adidas football is proud to make it,” said William Anderson, Adidas’s regional head of social and environmental affairs. “These people have a hard life because they live in rural Pakistan, but they themselves don’t think that they are living in poverty. We pay far more than agricultural work for example. It is an informal economy, a cottage industry, but we are doing all we can in that economy to support these workers.”

The official Adidas match ball for the World Cup is made in Shenzhen, southern China. Workers there are guaranteed the minimum wage in that country, which is £103 a month and many earn double that. The ball is thermally-bonded by machine in high-tech factories.

Footballs were first made in Sialkot for the British Army a hundred years ago. The industry has grown dramatically since, now comprising 224 factories and 1,997 stitching centres, but is under pressure from Chinese competition and rights organisations.

“No-one could say, hand-on-heart, they are happy with the lives of workers making sports balls in Sialkot,” Rob Cameron, Chief Executive of Fairtrade Labelling Organizations said. “We are planning a standards review. For a product meant to bring joy, we want to make sure it is not being made with pain.”


World Cup replica balls made on less than £2 a day - Telegraph
jabulani_1650681c.jpg
 

into the wild

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Jul 17, 2010
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i think jubulani balls are heavily criticised by the footballers, the high players of spanish team criticised it..

the author seem to miss this point..
 

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