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Taliban bans university education for Afghan girls

Mirzali Khan

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This, hit nail on the head. In the west the roles in a household for a mother and a father are very confused now, kids growing up don't understand role of dad and role of mum. There is absolutely nothing wrong in a dad helping out at home and a mum working and earning money. The issue is the structure itself is not consistent and its causing many social issues.

It’s also led to women being straight up delusional bro 😂😂😂
 

Novus ordu seclorum

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Taliban is zealously protecting an entrenched Afghan culture of violence and abuse against women. By giving themselves a cloak of holiness they assume they have achieved a station above criticism. Article below is from 2016 based on many years of work.
"Violence against women and girls is related to their lack of power and control, as well as to the social norms that prescribe men and women’s roles in society and condone abuse. These factors reinforce women’s low status in society.

One horrific story propelled me to research this article. Several months ago in an area east of Jalalabad, Afghanistan, a 15-year old girl died after her sister-in-law threw her into a tandoori oven. In yet another gruesome account in Afghanistan, a pregnant woman in her twenties had part of her genitals cut off. Her mother-in-law and sister–in–law helped her husband tie her up and beat her with a wooden stick. She miscarried.

... In Afghan society, patriarchy is created by men while guarded by women.

Afghanistan, India, Central Asia as well as many other male-dominated cultures that share the same structures to which women adhere, makes them think and act like men in terms of power and control. When the mother-in-law was a victim she justifies her position of perpetrating such violence toward her daughter-in-law.
“Thus, the women help in continuing the patriarchal system once they come to occupy positions of power in household or politics,” says Dr Shanthie D’Souza, president and founder of Mantraya, an independent web-based research forum. “Moreover, they continue with such measures to gain some amount of respect in their society where power is measured through control and subjugation among peers and men.”

On my first trip to Kabul in 2007, I became aware of Sippi Azarbaijani-Moghaddam’s legendary reputation as one of the foremost experts on Afghanistan. I met her shortly after and her insights and advice remain amongst the best. As a gender expert, she has worked in the country for over twenty years and doesn’t mince her words when it comes to explanations:

“power, powerlessness, lack of education, no rule of law, socialization into violence, acting out what has been done to them as children, shame, shame and more shame. With shame on top so victims and perpetrators are stuck in a bond of silence.”

“Women are the most ‘stuck’ in the cultural systems,” says Azerbaijani-Mogaddam. “Older women are rewarded by men for maintaining the cultural system so they punish transgressors. There is also jealousy when younger women come into the household and get more attention from men, and during war, violence at all levels of society escalates. Everyone, given the chance, is violent to everyone – hitting, sodomy, rape, sexual abuse, verbal abuse. It is a hierarchical society where many social norms have been broken down by war. Men are also stuck in the system and feel trapped to do anything but what is expected of them to maintain ‘face’.”
 

hydrabadi_arab

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Taliban is zealously protecting an entrenched Afghan culture of violence and abuse against women. By giving themselves a cloak of holiness they assume they have achieved a station above criticism. Article below is from 2016 based on many years of work.
"Violence against women and girls is related to their lack of power and control, as well as to the social norms that prescribe men and women’s roles in society and condone abuse. These factors reinforce women’s low status in society.

One horrific story propelled me to research this article. Several months ago in an area east of Jalalabad, Afghanistan, a 15-year old girl died after her sister-in-law threw her into a tandoori oven. In yet another gruesome account in Afghanistan, a pregnant woman in her twenties had part of her genitals cut off. Her mother-in-law and sister–in–law helped her husband tie her up and beat her with a wooden stick. She miscarried.

... In Afghan society, patriarchy is created by men while guarded by women.

Afghanistan, India, Central Asia as well as many other male-dominated cultures that share the same structures to which women adhere, makes them think and act like men in terms of power and control. When the mother-in-law was a victim she justifies her position of perpetrating such violence toward her daughter-in-law.
“Thus, the women help in continuing the patriarchal system once they come to occupy positions of power in household or politics,” says Dr Shanthie D’Souza, president and founder of Mantraya, an independent web-based research forum. “Moreover, they continue with such measures to gain some amount of respect in their society where power is measured through control and subjugation among peers and men.”

On my first trip to Kabul in 2007, I became aware of Sippi Azarbaijani-Moghaddam’s legendary reputation as one of the foremost experts on Afghanistan. I met her shortly after and her insights and advice remain amongst the best. As a gender expert, she has worked in the country for over twenty years and doesn’t mince her words when it comes to explanations:

“power, powerlessness, lack of education, no rule of law, socialization into violence, acting out what has been done to them as children, shame, shame and more shame. With shame on top so victims and perpetrators are stuck in a bond of silence.”

“Women are the most ‘stuck’ in the cultural systems,” says Azerbaijani-Mogaddam. “Older women are rewarded by men for maintaining the cultural system so they punish transgressors. There is also jealousy when younger women come into the household and get more attention from men, and during war, violence at all levels of society escalates. Everyone, given the chance, is violent to everyone – hitting, sodomy, rape, sexual abuse, verbal abuse. It is a hierarchical society where many social norms have been broken down by war. Men are also stuck in the system and feel trapped to do anything but what is expected of them to maintain ‘face’.”

Again this author is making huge mistake of lumping pashtuns with rest.

Fkmxo9GWQAEwD7m


What this article says is only true for taliban/pashtuns who are afghan by ethnicity. And their area is east and south as you can see in map above. Once that map become reality then 99% problems that article says will be confined to small part of so called pashtunistan. While Khorasan will emerge as modern state. Khorasanis are very distinct people in terms of culture and outlook to life in general. They are more comparable to central asian states.
 

Rusty2

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Taliban is zealously protecting an entrenched Afghan culture of violence and abuse against women. By giving themselves a cloak of holiness they assume they have achieved a station above criticism. Article below is from 2016 based on many years of work.
"Violence against women and girls is related to their lack of power and control, as well as to the social norms that prescribe men and women’s roles in society and condone abuse. These factors reinforce women’s low status in society.

One horrific story propelled me to research this article. Several months ago in an area east of Jalalabad, Afghanistan, a 15-year old girl died after her sister-in-law threw her into a tandoori oven. In yet another gruesome account in Afghanistan, a pregnant woman in her twenties had part of her genitals cut off. Her mother-in-law and sister–in–law helped her husband tie her up and beat her with a wooden stick. She miscarried.

... In Afghan society, patriarchy is created by men while guarded by women.

Afghanistan, India, Central Asia as well as many other male-dominated cultures that share the same structures to which women adhere, makes them think and act like men in terms of power and control. When the mother-in-law was a victim she justifies her position of perpetrating such violence toward her daughter-in-law.
“Thus, the women help in continuing the patriarchal system once they come to occupy positions of power in household or politics,” says Dr Shanthie D’Souza, president and founder of Mantraya, an independent web-based research forum. “Moreover, they continue with such measures to gain some amount of respect in their society where power is measured through control and subjugation among peers and men.”

On my first trip to Kabul in 2007, I became aware of Sippi Azarbaijani-Moghaddam’s legendary reputation as one of the foremost experts on Afghanistan. I met her shortly after and her insights and advice remain amongst the best. As a gender expert, she has worked in the country for over twenty years and doesn’t mince her words when it comes to explanations:

“power, powerlessness, lack of education, no rule of law, socialization into violence, acting out what has been done to them as children, shame, shame and more shame. With shame on top so victims and perpetrators are stuck in a bond of silence.”

“Women are the most ‘stuck’ in the cultural systems,” says Azerbaijani-Mogaddam. “Older women are rewarded by men for maintaining the cultural system so they punish transgressors. There is also jealousy when younger women come into the household and get more attention from men, and during war, violence at all levels of society escalates. Everyone, given the chance, is violent to everyone – hitting, sodomy, rape, sexual abuse, verbal abuse. It is a hierarchical society where many social norms have been broken down by war. Men are also stuck in the system and feel trapped to do anything but what is expected of them to maintain ‘face’.”
10000% true!
The patriarchy is so strong and so overreaching in our countries that women themselves perpetuate it.
Our societies are truly dystopian hell holes.
Yet, there are people here who have escaped but want to turn their new homeland into the same hellhole they escaped from.
 

Rusty2

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You are mixing up women's rights with feminism


I think we all can agree there needs to be womens rights to protect women from abuse, being used, underpaid etc etc

Feminism is a pernicious western ideology that has destroyed the family in the west

No Muslim would tolerate this ideology or it's proponents
Is opposing abuse in families a pernicious western ideology?
Every single Pakistani knows families that are dysfunctional, abusive, and downright evil. What use do these families have?
I rather a functional separated family then a dysfunctional abusive one.
 

PakistaniandProud

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It's not that that are conservatives,it's that they are crazy fanatics with a backwater village mentality.

They are basically evil people. And now they want to expand their ideology to Pakistan.

There's a huge difference between the Afghan Taliban and the Pakistani Taliban. Malala was attacked by the Pakistani Taliban. The Pakistani Taliban have not been able to overthrow the government in Pakistan because we have a powerful military who fought back. The Afghan Taliban overthrew NATO (Greece included) as well as the puppet Afghan government.
 

Mirzali Khan

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Again this author is making huge mistake of lumping pashtuns with rest.

Fkmxo9GWQAEwD7m


What this article says is only true for taliban/pashtuns who are afghan by ethnicity. And their area is east and south as you can see in map above. Once that map become reality then 99% problems that article says will be confined to small part of so called pashtunistan. While Khorasan will emerge as modern state. Khorasanis are very distinct people in terms of culture and outlook to life in general. They are more comparable to central asian states.

Nah it’s not only a Pashtun thing, although this law and decision was made by Pashtun babbus and mullahs and sardars.

History of Afghanistan has always had people and groups k¡lłing each other and trying to overthrow governments based on disagreements.


There's a huge difference between the Afghan Taliban and the Pakistani Taliban. Malala was attacked by the Pakistani Taliban. The Pakistani Taliban have not been able to overthrow the government in Pakistan because we have a powerful military who fought back. The Afghan Taliban overthrew NATO (Greece included) as well as the puppet Afghan government.

Showbaaz had offered TTP to not attack certain areas.
 

hydrabadi_arab

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Nah it’s not only a Pashtun thing, although this law and decision was made by Pashtun babbus and mullahs and sardars.

History of Afghanistan has always had people and groups k¡lłing each other and trying to overthrow governments based on disagreements.




Showbaaz had offered TTP to not attack certain areas.

Not really, now you will see Khorasani women coming out in streets in Kabul which is Tajik/Hazara majority city and you lot will say look afghan women are resisting taliban. When thats far from truth. Afghan women is confined to their homes in east and south Afghanistan. This is strugle between afghans (pashtuns) vs Khorasanis.

Only partion and making of Khorasan will bring peace.
 

Mirzali Khan

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Not really, now you will see Khorasani women coming out in streets in Kabul which is Tajik/Hazara majority city and you lot will say look afghan women are resisting taliban. When thats far from truth. Afghan women is confined to their homes in east and south Afghanistan. This is strugle between afghans (pashtuns) vs Khorasanis.

Only partion and making of Khorasan will bring peace.

You are looking at the context of now, which I agree its a Pashtun babbu thing.

But, historically even Tajiks opposed women's education and engaged in extremism e.g. Habibullah Kalakani and Burhanuddin Rabbani.
 

Foinikas

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The Afghan Taliban overthrew NATO (Greece included) as well as the puppet Afghan government.
First of all the Greek contingent had left long before the Americans, Germans,British etc.

Second,the Americans were not beaten by the Taliban. They left Afghanistan and it was the Afghan government and army that were defeated.
 

ayesha.a

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You are mixing up women's rights with feminism


I think we all can agree there needs to be womens rights to protect women from abuse, being used, underpaid etc etc

Feminism is a pernicious western ideology that has destroyed the family in the west

No Muslim would tolerate this ideology or it's proponents
It is the poster I was responding to, who confused the two. He is the one who brought the big bad "F" word into the conversation, and taking pleasure in this news because according to him, it would anger "feminists".

This thread is about women's rights being taken away.

By the way, I don't know what you consider to be feminism, and there are many ideologies that go by that banner, but in the early 20th century, people who argued for women's rights were called feminists. I deliberately choose not to use labels, precisely for this reason - they mean different things to different people.

Call it feminism, or if that word means something terrible to you, call it women's rights - education is a basic HUMAN right, as acknowledged the world over.
 

R Wing

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you mean like in Iran...

Only people who have a death grip on our society is the Lord Clive's b@stard sepoy Army led by secular degenerate Mir Jaffer Generals who enjoy their whisky and engage in p0rn productions.

I guess he meant the 'flavor' of religious conservatism. Iran's 'version' affords women 100x more rights, and is generally much more concerned with progress/development/innovation, than the Afg Taliban (and much of conservative Pakistan) version.

I agree with you though --- all roads lead to Rome. A supra-constitutional body with near-unlimited domestic power that operates outside of/above the law, can make and break political governments, and has the muscle and reach to enforce its desires must bear ultimate responsibility.
 

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