• Thursday, October 18, 2018

Sushma swamped by requests from Pakistanis, so India asks Pakistan to endorse patients for treatment

Discussion in 'Central & South Asia' started by Margarita, May 10, 2017.

  1. SOUTHie

    SOUTHie SENIOR MEMBER

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    May be, well congrats:tup:.
     
  2. Sully3

    Sully3 SENIOR MEMBER

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    that was in 2009, long time ago
    but thanks
     
  3. Margarita

    Margarita BANNED

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    Buying and selling of organs in India is illegal...

    Most of the people donate their organs to hospitals. Pakistanis come to Indian in huge number only because they do not have decent medical facility back home.


    Just see below

    May 11, 2017 at 16:45

    This IPS Officer Adopted An Andhra Village & Inspired Over 1.5 Lakh People To Donate Their Eyes
    by Shabdita Pareek

    [​IMG]

    The officers of the coveted Indian Police Services shoulder great responsibilities. But there are some who go out of their way for the betterment of our society. Ake Ravi Krishna, an IPS officer posted as the Superintendent of Police in the Kurnool district of Andhra Pradesh's Rayalseema region, is on a mission of his own. To make people aware of eye donation.

    Last year, the top cop himself pledged to donate organs and since then, he has inspired many others to follow the noble cause.

    [​IMG]
    The hardworking man, who worked as a data entry operator in Canara Bank before joining the Indian Police Services, has also adopted a village, Kapatrala. The village has a notorious reputation of being home to revenge murderers and faction killings. In fact, 21 people from the village are facing life imprisonment. But Ravi Krishna is determined to make it a better place.

    He also got the Kurnool District Collector to sanction Rs 60 lakhs for the construction of 10 rooms in a government school and is also actively involved in the construction of roads and starting literacy programmes in the village.

    [​IMG]
    A champion of social reform, the officer also wrote and sang a song to encourage people to donate their eyes after death. The video song titled Kallanu daanam chey, nee choopunu daanam chey, meaning 'donate your eyes, donate your vision', was widely shared by people on various social media platforms.

    [​IMG]
    Source: YouTube
    His regular visits to blind schools in Kurnool inspired him to write the song. His noble initiative has inspired over 1.5 lakh people to come forward to donate their eyes after death.


    Ravi Krishna is truly the people's officer!
     
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  4. Taimoor Khan

    Taimoor Khan SENIOR MEMBER

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    There are plenty of things which are illegal in third world countries but who care?

    You are billion plus nation who is dirt poor. Thats why organs are readily available for transplants. This scale of this human exploitation is not available anywhere in the world.
     
  5. Margarita

    Margarita BANNED

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    Pakistan is equally dirt poor. Don't behave as first world citizens coming to India for cheap medical facilities, you come to India because back home in Pakistan, the medical facility is dismal, even from a developing country standards.

    This is what a Pakistani Quora user has to say about Pakistani healthcare

    Pakistan does not have a free national health service. Care is provided by government run hospitals that charge a nominal fee, private run specialist hospitals, and very few hospitals run by charitable organisations. [1]

    As of 2013 , Pakistan spent just 1% of its gross domestic product (GDP) on health which is insufficient to cater the needs of the population [2]

    Quality healthcare in Pakistan is available but it comes with a price , a very heavy price which can only be afforded by the the rich but most of the population cannot afford it.

    Note that there ARE hospitals that have state-of-the-art facilities but that is only available to the rich.

    Poor people are forced to travel long distances , some even borrow money just to reach a goverment hospital only to realise there are thousands of people already waiting.The system is so poor that I have seen two patients lie on the same bed!

    [​IMG]
    Source: Poverty causing people to kill themselves in drought-hit Thar

    The government hospitals recieve thousands of people everyday and thus it is very hard to provide for them with the numbers increasing every single day.

    The private hospitals and health-care centres have doctors that have opened up their own clinics and they often recommend the patient to visit "their" clinic the next time they have to see the doctor by making up stories that the faculty lacks the equipment etc. just so that they can overcharge the patient.

    The quality of treatment is often very unhygienic and unsafe. You might go in thinking you will be cured but end up with two additional diseases.The hospitals are not maintained either.

    Infact there are buildings that cost millions of rupees that are incomplete and if they are completed , they are empty and used as a place to keep animals.

    [​IMG]
    Source: Stillbirth: Pindi mother and child hospital in doldrums - The Express Tribune

    There are cases where the doctors do not have the facilities to treat a patient in which case the next option is India.

    https://www.quora.com/Pakistan-How-is-the-healthcare-system-in-Pakistan

    @Taimoor Khan

    Pakistan is the only country in the world along with Afghanistan to still have Polio...

    @Taimoor Khan

    Read this from your own newspaper

    Medical tourism: In Indian hospitals, life-saving treatments for Pakistani patients

    For 11 years, Abdul Basit’s survival depended on how much time he spent under the phototherapy unit, bearing intense light and heat every day. As a newborn, Basit developed severe jaundice and was diagnosed to have Crigler–Najjar syndrome – a very rare inherited disorder in which bilirubin (a substance made by the liver) cannot be broken down and can cause brain damage and hearing loss.

    For the first two months of his life, Basit underwent continuous phototherapy at a hospital to eliminate bilirubin from his blood and then continued it at home. But as he grew older and his skin thickened, the light penetration decreased making the process less effective. This meant missing school and other activities to spend more and more time under the bright blue lights.

    Since liver transplant was the only permanent solution, Basit’s family started looking for possible options and learnt that the success rate for liver transplants done in Pakistan was very low. After thorough research and several recommendations, Basit’s family travelled to India in late 2015 for the life saving surgery.

    ‘Hospital equipped to deal with Congo virus’

    Today, Basit lives a full life and is no more called ‘the golden boy’ or ‘little sunflower’. He is one of the many Pakistanis who travel to India each year for various medical services because they are either not available in Pakistan or are not of a good quality. A hub of medical tourism, India attracts hundreds of patients every year from not just Pakistan but all over the world. According to the 2015 Grant Thornton report, the medical tourism industry in India is worth $3 billion and with 20% increase expected in the number of medical tourists coming to the country, the industry is predicted to touch the $8 billion mark by 2020.

    India, the neighbourhood doctor

    Dr Anupam Sibal from Apollo Hospitals, where Basit was treated, says medical tourists visit India because several of its hospitals have built a reputation for high quality and cost effectiveness. “We at Apollo are driven by twin motives. First is to ensure the highest quality and outcomes comparable with the best institutions in the world. Second is to ensure that these world class services are available to the largest section of population possible at an affordable cost. Costs of high-end procedures are one-tenth of that in the West with outcomes and success rates remaining comparable to the best centres the world over,” he says.

    In agreement, secretary general of Pakistan Medical Association (PMA) Dr Mirza Ali Azhar says there is no doubt or denial that healthcare services and medical education in India are far more superior to Pakistan’s. “There’s no difference of opinion on that. We accept our shortcomings and limitations. We wish if we cannot be as good as the UK or USA, we should at least try to be as good as India,” he stresses.

    Reiterating Sibal’s point, the PMA official says quality and cost are the two reasons why patients choose India over Pakistan for certain treatments. “Take liver transplant. We don’t have many centres in Pakistan and the one I know about flies surgeons in to perform the transplant. You can imagine how costly the procedure would be,” he says.

    In reference to patients travelling from Pakistan, Sibal says linkages between doctors from the two countries have traditionally been strong which helps in patients being managed more comprehensively before, during and after their treatment at Indian hospitals. “Telemedicine and regular interactions with clinicians in Pakistan also help in building trust and a connection between doctors and patients of the two countries,” he explains.

    Of cultural similarities, Sibal says a shared history, common language, customs and cuisines have all meant that people from Pakistan prefer to choose Indian hospitals for their tertiary healthcare needs.

    Overseas operations

    Despite the ever-lasting tensions between India and Pakistan, patients continue to trickle through the border in search of better services at a lower cost. According to 2013 estimates, 15% to 20% of all foreign tourists coming to India annually are Pakistanis.

    At Pims hospital, no Eid for burn victims

    Every year, Sibal says hundreds of Pakistani patients use Apollo’s facilities, most particularly in New Delhi. “We witness a large number of cases of solid organ transplants, liver and combined liver-kidney transplants, at our hospitals. Patients for cancer care, neurosciences, gastroenterology and paediatrics and orthopaedics also use our facilities,” he states. Sibal says while some of these services are available in Pakistan, many advanced stage cases requiring access to technology like robotics and cyberknife are referred to them.

    PMA’s Azhar adds patients from Pakistan, especially children, also travel to India for treatment of congenital heart defects. “The Indian city of Bangalore has a big centre for treatment of children with heart defects and it attracts young patients from around the region,” he states.

    With India emerging as a surrogacy hub, Azhar says foreigners also fly to the country to rent a womb. “It is fairly common in India and we cannot have this facility in Pakistan because of the many religious and social issues it will give birth to. We are not aware if Pakistanis have gone to India for this option, but even if someone has it will be a highly hushed up matter given our opinion on surrogacy,” he states. A recently proposed bill in India calls for ban on commercial surrogacy and foreigners seeking surrogate mothers.

    Healthcare professional Sumit Wadhwa, who runs a company named MediGuardians in India to facilitate foreign medical travellers, says most patients from Pakistan come to Delhi because of its close proximity to Lahore. “In that sense, the whole northern part of India becomes a viable option for Pakistani patients. Patients from Karachi prefer to go to Mumbai as it is easier to travel that route. Chennai is another favourite location,” he shares.

    In the short span of four months, Wadhwa’s health-tech start-up has served seven Pakistani patients. The MediGuardians co-founder shares patients can connect to a doctor sitting in an Indian city for $15-20, start consultation and share their medical history from the comfort of their homes. “Doing this all on your own takes plenty of time and involves several middlemen; our website cuts short this chain of people and turnaround time,” he says.

    Explaining the process, Wadhwa says once the patient decides to have a surgery in India, they are informed about the available choices. “The patients go through counselling and are told about the success rate, rules and regulations and other details. The patient then has to provide all the required documents before an invitation letter can be issued by the hospital where they will be treated,” he states.

    From his experience, Wadhwa says he has realised that the number of Pakistanis will most likely increase if there is more awareness about the medical visa issued to those wanting to travel to India for healthcare services. “If all the rules are followed and there’s proper documentation, the medical visa is issued in three to four days as compared to 40 days for a tourist visa,” he says.

    Lessons for Pakistan

    Having been to Pakistan twice, MediGuardians’ Wadhwa says he can vouch for high quality of healthcare services in at least few of the fields. “Healthcare facilities for cardiology and electrophysiology in Pakistan are at par with developed countries; the hospitals have the latest technology and doctors are trained and have practiced abroad,” he says.

    Apollo’s Sibal also agrees there are many good centres providing excellent healthcare in Pakistan. However, Wadhwa says certain segments are still not well developed such as cancer surgeries and liver transplants. “Pakistan will eventually excel in these fields as well but till then India becomes an obvious choice for those looking for a solution,” he explains.

    Promotion case: Contempt notices issued against hospital officials

    PMA’s Azhar says it is important to have life-saving treatments in the country so that patients don’t have to travel to another country. However, he laments Pakistan’s lack of focus on prevention. “We as a country work for cure which is expensive whereas prevention can be more useful. There’s vaccine for hepatitis and if we immunise the entire population we won’t have to worry about the disease,” he says.

    Regretting Pakistan’s inability to prevent diseases and conditions such as polio, diarrhoea and dysentery, Azhar says just making sure each and every person has taken the basic vaccinations will have a big impact on the overall public health. But unfortunately, Azhar adds there is no trend for research in the healthcare industry. “The most we have is data from one centre in one city of our country. There’s no data on the national situation and no one’s interested in gathering it,” he laments. The PMA official says mass-scale campaigning via media is needed to raise awareness among the public.

    Medical packages

    Liver transplant costs around INR2,000,000, kidney transplant costs INR1,000,000 and cancer surgeries cost between INR500,000 to INR600,000. These packages include everything except for flights to and from home country and accommodation for pre and post surgery stages.

    Sumit Wadhwa, co-founder MediGuardians.
     
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  6. Taimoor Khan

    Taimoor Khan SENIOR MEMBER

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    Listen kiddo. We never claim to be shupa powa or first world country. What make us laugh is you lot portraying your country as some sort of first world heaven.

    Yes we are poor but our numbers are far less then you lot. More poor in India mean more desperate people who can sell their organs for cash. And that is the reason why India is destination for people who wants to get organ transplants. Why this simple fact is not going through your thick head?

    And are you suggesting me that your billion plus nation , majority of them who defecate out in open, get free and top notch medical care in your country? You having a laugh or something?

    Everyday in Pakistan, hundreds of Afghans cross over to get the medical treatment. Infact, just recently, we had to open the Chamman border to allow sick Afghans to pass through so they can get their treatment in Pakistan. We dont boast about it and that doesnt make our medical top notch in the world.

    Get out of your hallucination.
     
  7. Margarita

    Margarita BANNED

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    Difference is

    India is poor but we have world class space tech, decent medical facility, decent educational institutes (although some institutes are world class), world class entertainment industry, decent automobile sector, decent railways, Growing Economy

    While,

    Pakistan is poor and it has poor space tech, poor medical facilities, poor educational institutes, poor entertainment industry, poor automobile sector, poor railways, poor economy.

    I hope you understand the difference and you can see which country is in the right path.
     
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  8. ghameed

    ghameed FULL MEMBER

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    And again...and again..and again..like a broken record ..lol :-) . I laugh at the knowledge this person possesses on organ transplantation !!
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2017
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  9. boxer_B

    boxer_B BANNED

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    I read news about a decade back of some Portuguese or Polish who fainted in Goa. He was then diagnosed with tumor in throat or some place else and it was long and huge. Then he was airlifted to Mumbai where doctor had to take out entire blood from body so as not to cause excess bleeding.
    He was virtually dead for 45 minutes of surgery and then blood is intervened back.

    Some story like that but cannot find on net.
     
  10. NakedLunch

    NakedLunch BANNED

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    Oh Lord. Talk about a complete lack of class. If a Pakistani cow grazed accidentally in an Indian field these Indians would come here all puffed up and oily haired about how Pakistani cows need Indian grass. No other country in the World tries to prove their worth like Indians do. Do you people feel no shame whatsoever?
     
  11. Margarita

    Margarita BANNED

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    Why should we feel shame? We are not the ones begging enemy country for medical treatment. We are not the one begging enemy country for sports. We are not the one begging enemy country for movies. Exactly why should we feel shame?
     
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  12. ghameed

    ghameed FULL MEMBER

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    More like the usual Pakistani inferiority complex at play , considering how the discussion played out ..lol. Btw thanks for comparing your pakistani patients to grazing cows . Real Classy !!
     
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  13. NakedLunch

    NakedLunch BANNED

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    That last part was a rhetorical question. I didnt expect someone to be stupid enough to answer it. You deserve a prize.
     
  14. Margarita

    Margarita BANNED

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    Mr. English, why not try answer the question I asked rather than correcting my grammar?
     
  15. jaatki

    jaatki BANNED

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    Wow.....just wow, i think people of pakistan are calling sushma swaraj for another kidney transplant right? Cheap my foot....never been to India even once in life and speculates everything..... do search for top notch hospitals, har nukkad or gali mein mil jaega...costly medical services show the lack of facilities a country has, India has alot of such branches of super specialty hospital as a result competition is tough, thus companies tend to lower service costs.....its competition that lowers the prices....if your lower your medicines cost by rs.1, you earn millions over your rival companies.... tell your top notch doctors to use a toilet instead....and do ask them about how many medicine and drug manufacturing companies do India have and how much medicines do pakistan imports from cheap indian market...
     
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