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Strategic Analysis: Bangladesh Air Force reaches for the skies

Destranator

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I second getting the F-16V first as well. Maybe four squadrons would do it but I am no aerospace strategy expert.

The point is, we have to have some capability in the F-16V to carry long range maritime strike missiles, I have to research that to see whether US or Turkey offers such a munition...in this sector PAF could be our role model as they also operate the F-16 but maybe not in that role.

Right now we lack a deep maritime strike capability. Deep meaning within 40 miles of any target that violates our maritime zone.
3-4 squadrons of 4++ gen fighters is the bare minimum we need to be able to put up any sort of air defence. This by no means is sufficient.
F-16s can perform limited maritime strike within the EEZ with aerial refuelling but cannot clear out a naval blockade near Andaman. We will need a combination of attack submarines, heavy frigates, ballistic missiles, drones and twin engine fighters to defeat a naval blockade - a pipedream till 2050.
 
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Bilal9

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3-4 squadrons of 4++ gen fighters is the bare minimum we need to be able to put up any sort of air defence.
This is by no means is sufficient. F-16s can perform limited maritime strike within the EEZ with aerial refuelling but cannot clear out a naval blockade near Andaman. We will need a combination of attack submarines, heavy frigates, ballistic missiles, drones and twin engine fighters to defeat a naval blockade - a pipedream till 2050.
Yeah a sad state of affairs, but I have some trust in our Naval command, unlike the other services of the military. I hope they can get to building the six/eight heavy frigates with Turkey as planned.

Even after 2050, and given we have all the assets you mentioned, defeating a naval blockade in international waters (or another country's EEZ and maritime limits) may be tough without involving other superpowers. In our case that would have to be China, however they may not want to meddle in this situation unless it affects their interests.
 

Avicenna

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I would rather have more F-16V than a smaller number of Eurofighter.

Provided we get the goodies like AMRAAM and Harpoon.
 

Avicenna

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I don't even think BAF would get new delivery until well after 2025 with F-16V given the orders needed to be completed.

May be better to buy Eurofighter first.


F-16s Could Still be Flying Into the 2070s

May 23, 2021 | By John A. Tirpak

Based on Lockheed Martin’s backlog of F-16 orders, planned upgrades, and the recent revelation that the Air Force plans to depend on the fighter into the late 2030s, the F-16’s sunset years now could come in the 2070s, or later.
Lockheed Martin’s backlog of 128 F-16s—all for foreign military sales—won’t all be delivered until 2026, and the company anticipates more orders may be coming. With a potential service life of 40 years or more, those jets could be flying into the late 2060s or later. The type first entered service in the 1970s.

“There are 25 nations operating F-16s today,” said Col. Brian Pearson, Air Force Life Cycle Management Center lead for F-16 FMS, in a May 17 press release. Lockheed’s Greenville, S.C., F-16 manufacturing and upgrade facility, which will start turning out new F-16s in 2022, “helps us meet the global demand” for F-16 aircraft, he said. Lockheed moved its F-16 work from Fort Worth, Texas, in 2019 to make room there for expanded F-35 production.
Since the new line opened, AFLCMC’s security assistance and cooperation directorate “has seen an uptick of our partner nations requesting detailed information and requests for U.S. government sales,” said Col. Anthony Walker, senior materiel leader in the international division.

The 128 jets are for Bahrain, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Taiwan, and another country the company declined to name, although Croatia and the Philippines have been mentioned as customers. These aircraft will be in the Block 70/72 configuration, which includes new radar, displays, conformal fuel tanks, and other improvements over the Block 50/52 version, the most recent flown by USAF. Lockheed is building F-16s at a rate of about four per month at Greenville.
India is also considering buying an advanced F-16 version Lockheed has dubbed the “F-21,” which Lockheed touts as having a 12,000-hour service life; roughly 50 percent more than the ones the USAF flies. At normal utilization, 12,000 hours is about 32 years of service. India would produce those jets indigenously. India is looking to buy 114 fighters, and Lockheed is partnered with Tata to build the jets if it wins the competition.
Gregory M. Ulmer, Lockheed’s vice president for aeronautics, told reporters in February the company sees a potential for 300 additional F-16 sales not yet on the books, some of which will be to “repeat” customers.
The increased foreign interest may be related to the USAF’s hints over the last two years that it will continue to fly the F-16 beyond previous plans, thus reassuring customers that the parts and support pipeline for a large number of aircraft will persist.
Those hints turned more concrete in recent days. Talking points drawn up for USAF Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr. about the service’s future fighter force plans, obtained by Air Force Magazine, indicate the Air Force expects that “600+ late-block F-16s will provide affordable capacity for the next 15+ years,” in both competitive and permissive combat environments. These aircraft will in fact be the USAF’s “capacity force,” the documents say, and will serve as a “rheostat,” meaning their total number can be adjusted up or down depending on the success of the F-35 program and a separate F-16 replacement now known as the Multi-Role-X.

The Air Force considers “competitive” to mean airspace that is reasonably well defended by aircraft and surface-to-air systems. “Highly competitive” and “denied” airspace would only be penetrable by fifth-gen and sixth-gen aircraft with extremely low observable qualities.
Although the fiscal year 2022 budget request, to be released May 28, will reveal some details of the Air Force’s new force structure plans, Brown said at the recent McAleese and Associates defense conference that the meat of the plan will be spelled out in the fiscal ’23 budget.
In the near-term, the USAF plans the divestiture of all the F-16 “pre-blocks” of aircraft, meaning all those that remain in its inventory of the Block 15-25-30 versions.
Lockheed received an indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract in January worth up to $64.3 billion for production of new F-16s for FMS customers, as well as upgrades of 405 jets in foreign hands to the F-16V configuration, which is similar to the F-21 model proposed to India. These modifications will include “new radar and other upgrades to make them similar to the aircraft that will come off the production line,” AFLCMC’s release said.

The large omnibus contract creates a baseline F-16 configuration for all future production, with the Air Force acting as the agent for FMS customers. Each country will sign a separate contract for unique or custom equipment they want on their particular jets. An Air Force official said the arrangement “simplifies and accelerates” the FMS process for countries wanting to buy the F-16, “so we can get it into their hands faster than has been the case in recent years.” The approach is needed because of the increased expected demand for the airplane, he said. It also reduces the cost of the jet by allowing vendors to make larger, more economic quantities of parts and structural components. The work will also integrate the Joint Mission Planning System/Mission Planning Environment software update.
The contract specifically mentioned work for Bahrain, Bulgaria, Chile, Columbia, Croatia, Egypt, Greece, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Morocco, Korea, Oman, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, Romania, Singapore, Slovenia, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates.
Japan flies an F-16 variant, called the F-2, but it performs all work on that type.

More than 4,550 F-16s have been delivered to the U.S. and allied countries since the 1970s. The late Michele A. Evans, Ulmer’s predecessor as Lockheed VP for aeronautics, said in September 2020, the company sees a possibility “of getting up to 5,000” F-16s built. She also said the company views the F-16 as an entrée to its F-35, for countries that are not yet ready to adopt the fifth-generation fighter, but may wish to later.
Brig. Gen. Dale R. White, the USAF’s program executive officer for fighters and advanced aircraft, called the F-16 an “enduring, highly capable compact fighter that will have a large role in many partner nations’ security for years to come.”


Lockheed: New Demand for F-16s Could Push Type Past 5,000 Mark

Sept. 11, 2020 | By John A. Tirpak

After nearly shutting down production several times, Lockheed Martin is getting a surge of orders for the F-16. With a current backlog of 130 jets, and several countries on the cusp of making orders, the company sees a possibility of surpassing the 5,000th airplane of the type, Lockheed Martin Executive Vice President of Aeronautic Michele A. Evans said Sept. 9.

“We’re seeing a … resurgence of the F-16 business,” Evans said in an interview with Air Force Magazine. The company is producing Block 70 Falcons for Bahrain, Bulgaria, and Slovakia at its Greenville, S.C., plant, where it moved the F-16 line last year, freeing up space at its Fort Worth, Texas, plant for the F-35 production line.

“We’re up to about 4,600 aircraft delivered and can see possibly getting up to 5,000,” Evans said.
Production is ramping up to four aircraft a month at Greenville, which has increased its workforce to 400 employees, she noted. It is also operating under an indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity Air Force contract to supply F-16s to Morocco and Taiwan and potential future or repeat customers. The IDIQ vehicle will streamline and speed up contracting so there is a “base configuration” of aircraft to be built, “and then we propose only the unique capabilities for each country,” in the form of specific sensors or capabilities, she said. “We then just negotiate that contract with those countries.”

The backlog does not include India, where Lockheed is seeking a contract for an advanced version of the F-16 to be called the F-21. Along with partner Tata, Lockheed would build 114 airplanes in India, under license, if it wins the competition.
The F-16 sales could also create future F-35 customers, Evans said. “For a lot of these countries, … as we get them capable with the F-16, we believe the next step for many … is future procurement of the F-35.”
Evans said the U.S. Air Force is seeking more operational flight program and software updates for its own F-16s, and may be interested in other improvements as well. The Air Force is “looking to advance the capability” of its Falcons, she said.

The current backlog will keep the F-16 in production through 2025, Evans noted, but Lockheed would consider increasing the rate of production if demand increases. Hitting 5,000 Falcons delivered would likely take more than seven years of sustained work, she said. However, “We don’t see any issues in terms of being able to meet customer demand,” she added.
 

Indos

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I second getting the F-16V first as well. Maybe four squadrons would do it but I am no aerospace strategy expert.

The point is, we have to have some capability in the F-16V to carry long range maritime strike missiles, I have to research that to see whether US or Turkey offers such a munition...in this sector PAF could be our role model as they also operate the F-16 but maybe not in that role.

Right now we lack a deep maritime strike capability. Deep meaning within 40 miles of any target that violates our maritime zone.
If you want to have long range maritime strike missiles, you can wait KF 21/IFX program to reach its mass production stage in 2026 inshaAllah

1631839673427.png


This fighter will use Meteor missile for BVR and IRS-T missile for WVR

Maritime strike missile with this missile ( first missile)


South Korea Tests New Missiles Including Countries First Submarine-Launched Ballistic Missile
 
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BAF should go for:

4 squadrons(64 ) of Mig 29 (upgraded)
1squadron(16) of EFT tranche 4 if not five
Few squadrons of F 7bgs.

You have mig29 already so no costs of integration work.
Remember India is also using mig 29.
 

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US threw BAF off its game with its F-16V offer.
We have never lost a contract to a competitor
- Anonymous LM executive

guys look at the Philipines F-16V offer



In three separate notifications posted by the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) on 24 June, the US State Department cleared the sale of 10 single-seat Block 70 and two twin-seat Block 72 F-16V fighters (in the approval they are given their US Air Force F-16C/D designations, rather than the manufacturer's F-16V), 24 Raytheon AIM-9X Sidewinder Block II air-to-air missiles, and 12 Boeing AGM-84L-1 Harpoon Block II anti-shipping missiles.

“The proposed sale will improve the Philippines' capability to meet current and future threats by enabling the Philippines to deploy fighter aircraft with precision munitions in support of counter-terrorism operations in the southern Philippines, increasing effectiveness and minimising collateral damage,” the DSCA said of the F-16V approval, adding that the wider package “will support the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a strategic partner that continues to be an important force for political stability, peace, and economic progress in South East Asia”.

As noted by the DCSA, the F-16V sale includes related equipment and weapons, such as the Northrop Grumman AN/APG-83 active electronically scanned array (AESA) Scalable Agile Beam Radar (SABR), either the Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System II (JHMCS II) or Scorpion Hybrid Optical-based Inertial Tracker (HObIT), Raytheon AIM-120C-7/C-8 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missiles (AMRAAMs), an integrated electronic warfare suite, and other items. The estimated value of the F-16V sale is USD2.43 billion.
 

Keysersoze

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Another issue is the procurement cost. Based on several existing users, the Rafale and the ‘advanced Eagle’ have come at a unit price of US$243-US$290 million and $333-$350 million, respectively, including training for pilots and maintainers, a weapons package, support and sustainment contracts, and associated facilities and equipment.

In addition, operating modern combat aircraft is costly. The Rafale and F-15EX cost $16,000 and $27,000 per flight-hour. In comparison, F-16, the most numerous fighter in the TNI-AU service, costs two or three times less to operate. The higher operating costs would translate into significantly higher through-life costs for the two types.

Yes but the Rafale and F15EX are both twin engine fighters. Given the topography of Bangladesh a Twin engine aircraft might be the better option.
 

Destranator

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We have never lost a contract to a competitor
- Anonymous LM executive

guys look at the Philipines F-16V offer



In three separate notifications posted by the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) on 24 June, the US State Department cleared the sale of 10 single-seat Block 70 and two twin-seat Block 72 F-16V fighters (in the approval they are given their US Air Force F-16C/D designations, rather than the manufacturer's F-16V), 24 Raytheon AIM-9X Sidewinder Block II air-to-air missiles, and 12 Boeing AGM-84L-1 Harpoon Block II anti-shipping missiles.

“The proposed sale will improve the Philippines' capability to meet current and future threats by enabling the Philippines to deploy fighter aircraft with precision munitions in support of counter-terrorism operations in the southern Philippines, increasing effectiveness and minimising collateral damage,” the DSCA said of the F-16V approval, adding that the wider package “will support the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a strategic partner that continues to be an important force for political stability, peace, and economic progress in South East Asia”.

As noted by the DCSA, the F-16V sale includes related equipment and weapons, such as the Northrop Grumman AN/APG-83 active electronically scanned array (AESA) Scalable Agile Beam Radar (SABR), either the Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System II (JHMCS II) or Scorpion Hybrid Optical-based Inertial Tracker (HObIT), Raytheon AIM-120C-7/C-8 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missiles (AMRAAMs), an integrated electronic warfare suite, and other items. The estimated value of the F-16V sale is USD2.43 billion.
That's ~200 million per unit including armanents. If the choice is between F-16V and Gripen for the single engine/medium weight fighter category, I would go for Gripen hands down due to lower cost and ToT.
A mix of Gripen/F-16V and J10C (only if specs can be verified by monitoring performance with other export clients - I take Chinese govt claims with a grain of salt. There's also the issue of ceased production but that could be temporary. ) would serve BAF well in terms of operational readiness.
 

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That's ~200 million per unit including armanents.
yeah but bulgaria got their new F-16V for 156 million usd / jet(they never used F-16s before). While Taiwan cost around 196 Million. Some sources state 125 million. Imo we can get 16 of them for the 3 billion USD.


A mix of Gripen/F-16V and J10C
Do you think we will operate a mixed origin fleet or all of the future fighters will be western ?
Genetic diversity among a species allows resistance against diseases. J-10c is an unkown quantity (maybe that's a good thing). Nobody except for maybe PRC knows its strengths and weaknesses.
Our adversaries are resourceful and will have trained against western fighter types. A mixed origin fleet has its advantages and disadvantages.
 
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Destranator

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yeah but bulgaria got their new F-16V for 156 million usd / jet(they never used F-16s before). While Taiwan cost around 196 Million. Some sources state 125 million. Imo we can get 16 of them for the 3 billion USD.



Do you think we will operate a mixed origin fleet or all of the future fighters will be western ?
Genetic diversity among a species allows resistance against diseases. J-10c is an unkown quantity (maybe that's a good thing). Nobody except for maybe PRC knows its strengths and weaknesses.
Our adversaries are resourceful and will have trained against western fighter types. A mixed origin fleet has its advantages and disadvantages.
The main reason for proposing a Western/Chinese mix is to ensure we are not stifled for supplies in the event of war with either India or Burma.
Western corporations run their governments These corporations have a vested interest in maintaining good relationships with India.
On the other hand, Burma is a source of natural resources and port access for China.
 
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Avicenna

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There is nobody named Dr Mahmud Rafiq. It's a fake name. I am sure defsucka doesn't pay the bills. Ashiqur Rahman completed a BA from the University of Wollongong to get his permanent residency in Australia. He has no clue about Fluid Dynamics. He couldn't find a good job in Australia. So he started working as a delivery driver at Toll Priority.

Bounce of clown who has no clue about aerospace industries and wants to fit in PL-12 and Turkish bomb in F-7. These type of people has no shame to spread idiotic ideas.

Ashiqur Rahman is spreading disinformation that Bangladesh Army bought HQ-22. Propaganda will catch Bangladesh if Burma wants to strike inside Bangladesh hard.
Haha, man you are disturbed.
 

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