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Storage Facility for P-282 Missile, PNMC Mauripur

CSAW

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COMLOG:

WEAPONS, MISSILES AND AMMUNITION

PAKISTAN NAVY

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The Weapon & Ammunition Group’s mission :

a. To provide armament logistics support to PN fleet, Naval Air Arm and establishments ensuring that the armaments supplied are:
Safe in Storage
Reliable in Use
Efficient in Functioning

b. Functioning of W&A group is based on mission–oriented approach i.e. all the functions and activities towards fulfillment of the mission are performed by the group in totality and independently. Hence this group exhibits a perfect example of one window operation.

c. For purpose of command and control as well as for effective and efficient utilization of resources, the Armament Depots have been grouped together to form Weapons & Ammunition Group, headed by a Managing Director.


Pakistan Navy Ammunition Depot (PNAD) It was established in 1958 at Mauripur. The main task of PNAD is to provide storage, maintenance and repair facilities for all types of ammunition. The depot is self sufficient to carry out complete maintenance and repair of the entire range of ammunition independently and have dedicated ammunition proof testing facilities.

PN Missile Complex (PNMC) As the name implies it takes care of the storage, maintenance and repair of missiles, air to surface Exocet AM-39, subsurface to surface SM-39, surface to surface SY-I(G), all three versions of Harpoons, surface to air Mistral, LY-60(N) and surface to surface C-802.

PN Torpedo Depot (PNTD) Takes care of the storage, maintenance and repair of all types of torpedoes held in the service including their preparation and analysis for their exercise firings.

Armament Supply Depot (PNASD). PNASD is located at sub depot area and provides guns, small arms and webbing equipment support to PN units afloat and ashore.

PN Ordnance Repair Depot (PNORD). This depot provides maintenance support for all inventory managed by PNASD.

Chief Inspector of Naval Armaments (CINA). Another important aspects of the Armament Logistics support is the concept of Quality Assurance, which is achieved for the entire range of in-service weapons and ammunition through an independent inspection organization headed by a Chief Inspector of Naval Armaments (CINA).

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Raja Porus

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Finally it is confirmed those P 282 will be hypersonic Missile's for Pakistan Navy

The news broken by my friends weeks ago now becoming a reality


Outlaw broke the news before any one

Finally it is confirmed those P 282 will be hypersonic Missile's for Pakistan Navy

The news broken by my friends weeks ago now becoming a reality


Outlaw broke the news before any one
The news was first broken by none other than the chief of Naval Staff Admiral Zafar Mehmood Abbasi himself in October 2020.
 

khansaheeb

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Project P-282: Pakistan Navy’s Hypersonic Weapons Program​

By
Admin PSF
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October 14, 2021
0
2003



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Project P-282: Pakistan’s Hypersonic Weapons Program Project P-282: Pakistan’s Hypersonic Weapons Program
As Pakistani military observers may have noticed in the last decade, the Pakistan Navy is being revamped, and heavily invested in, culminating in a major procurement drive that includes newer and more powerful frigates, corvettes, submarines, and maritime patrol aircraft. In addition to this, the Pakistan Navy is shifting from a defensive force that safeguarded Pakistani waters relatively closer to shore, to an ocean-going navy and focusing on an anti-access, area-denial doctrine, incorporating offensive capabilities that extend several hundreds of kilometers from Pakistan’s coast. The future of this doctrine is undoubtedly the P-282 program. Not much is known about the program aside from the first official verification of the program by the former Chief of Naval Staff, Admiral Zafar Mehmood Abbasi in October 2020 when he said, “In the hypersonic domain, ship-based long-range anti-Ship and land-Attack P-282 ballistic missile is under development.”
Many people have misunderstood this statement and confusion has arisen over if Pakistan is actually developing hypersonic weapons or if this is just a traditional ballistic missile to be put on ships. What the admiral likely meant is that the P-282 project will develop a surface-launched ballistic missile with a hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV) as a warhead. This is different from the other type of hypersonic weapon: a hypersonic cruise missile. The main difference between these two types of hypersonic weapons is that a hypersonic cruise missile is fired from bombers or is ground-launched via a rocket motor, and subsequently uses scramjet propulsion to reach speeds above Mach 5. These air breathing hypersonic cruise missiles cannot operate above 100,000 feet. On the other hand, HGVs are launched via ballistic missiles and are the missile’s payload (in place of the warhead that reenters the atmosphere and hits its target in a ballistic trajectory). These HGVs are maneuverable in the sense that large-angle deviations are possible from the carrier missile’s original parabolic trajectory and these maneuvers can be controlled, with the weapon essentially executing a boost-glide trajectory, using aerodynamic lift as well as a ballistic boost to extend its range: they’ll ‘skip’ on the roof of the stratosphere at speeds of over Mach 15 and require highly advanced composite materials which are able to withstand temperatures of up to 2,000 degrees Celsius. The combination of manoeuvrability, an unpredictable trajectory and high speed poses an almost insurmountable challenges for conventional ballistic missile defense. These weapons could strike tactical, strategic, and operational-level targets anywhere on enemy territory much more quickly than subsonic cruise missiles and have significant kinetic energy even without a high explosive warhead, but warheads of any type can be integrated into these HGVs. Although most countries are developing land-based or air launched missiles to launch these HGVs or hypersonic cruise missiles, Pakistan is surprisingly pursuing a ship-based approach. Ship-based ballistic missiles are highly uncommon but considering that this capability will most likely be used in the conventional domain and not the strategic one, we can assume that the missiles will likely be deployed primarily for anti-surface warfare, with a secondary land-attack role. This may also point to the possibility that the Air Force and Army would only need to develop their own missiles for a triad, as the same HGV could commonly be used by all three services. The Navy’s missile would be smaller and more compact, so that it could be fitted onto ships, the Air Force would have to develop a new type of booster, even smaller than the Navy’s, that can be fitted onto J-10CP and JF-17A/B aircraft which would be able to propel the HGV to the edges of the atmosphere and hypersonic speeds. The Army, of course, would have to work the least, and can use the Navy-developed HGV from any of their existing missile platforms.
Since Pakistan has already mastered the art of developing advanced ballistic missiles, the real challenge is developing a hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV) that will be a payload to that missile. Hypersonic weapons, with their speed and unpredictability making them near impossible to intercept, would give the Pakistan Armed Forces the capability to (conventionally or otherwise) conduct unstoppable strikes on any type of targets anywhere on enemy territory, with the opponent’s reaction time reduced to almost nothing. Countermeasures to hypersonic weapons have not yet started development, as of 2019. Currently the hypersonic race is being led by Russia and China, followed by the U.S., and then France, Australia, India, Pakistan, Germany, and Japan.
Update on Project P-282
A letter has been shared online, issued by the Engineer-in-Chief’s office for an Expression of Interest (EOI) for “consultancy services for construction of an air conditioned workshop and storage facility for the P-282 missile system at PNMC Mauripur”. The construction of storage facilities for the weapons system means the missile might very close to being ready for testing. The P-282 missile has been described as “in the hypersonic domain” and a “ship-launched anti-ship and land attack ballistic missile” by the last CNS. The missile will initially arm Pakistan Navy’s Jinnah class frigates.
letter has been shared online, issued by the Engineer-in-Chief’s office for an Expression of Interest (EOI)
letter has been shared online, issued by the Engineer-in-Chief’s office for an Expression of Interest (EOI)
#WhiskeyPapa
#TeamPakistanStrategicForum


Pakistan Navy should omit site locations and other sensitive information when advertising.
 

Bratva

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Finally it is confirmed those P 282 will be hypersonic Missile's for Pakistan Navy

The news broken by my friends weeks ago now becoming a reality


Outlaw broke the news before any one

You have a tendency of making lot of BS claims and turn those claims in youtube videos. You need to stop that.
 

arslank03

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Project P-282: Pakistan Navy’s Hypersonic Weapons Program​

By
Admin PSF
-
October 14, 2021
0
2003



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https://vk.com/share.php?url=https:...82-pakistan-navys-hypersonic-weapons-program/
Project P-282: Pakistan’s Hypersonic Weapons Program Project P-282: Pakistan’s Hypersonic Weapons Program
As Pakistani military observers may have noticed in the last decade, the Pakistan Navy is being revamped, and heavily invested in, culminating in a major procurement drive that includes newer and more powerful frigates, corvettes, submarines, and maritime patrol aircraft. In addition to this, the Pakistan Navy is shifting from a defensive force that safeguarded Pakistani waters relatively closer to shore, to an ocean-going navy and focusing on an anti-access, area-denial doctrine, incorporating offensive capabilities that extend several hundreds of kilometers from Pakistan’s coast. The future of this doctrine is undoubtedly the P-282 program. Not much is known about the program aside from the first official verification of the program by the former Chief of Naval Staff, Admiral Zafar Mehmood Abbasi in October 2020 when he said, “In the hypersonic domain, ship-based long-range anti-Ship and land-Attack P-282 ballistic missile is under development.”
Many people have misunderstood this statement and confusion has arisen over if Pakistan is actually developing hypersonic weapons or if this is just a traditional ballistic missile to be put on ships. What the admiral likely meant is that the P-282 project will develop a surface-launched ballistic missile with a hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV) as a warhead. This is different from the other type of hypersonic weapon: a hypersonic cruise missile. The main difference between these two types of hypersonic weapons is that a hypersonic cruise missile is fired from bombers or is ground-launched via a rocket motor, and subsequently uses scramjet propulsion to reach speeds above Mach 5. These air breathing hypersonic cruise missiles cannot operate above 100,000 feet. On the other hand, HGVs are launched via ballistic missiles and are the missile’s payload (in place of the warhead that reenters the atmosphere and hits its target in a ballistic trajectory). These HGVs are maneuverable in the sense that large-angle deviations are possible from the carrier missile’s original parabolic trajectory and these maneuvers can be controlled, with the weapon essentially executing a boost-glide trajectory, using aerodynamic lift as well as a ballistic boost to extend its range: they’ll ‘skip’ on the roof of the stratosphere at speeds of over Mach 15 and require highly advanced composite materials which are able to withstand temperatures of up to 2,000 degrees Celsius. The combination of manoeuvrability, an unpredictable trajectory and high speed poses an almost insurmountable challenges for conventional ballistic missile defense. These weapons could strike tactical, strategic, and operational-level targets anywhere on enemy territory much more quickly than subsonic cruise missiles and have significant kinetic energy even without a high explosive warhead, but warheads of any type can be integrated into these HGVs. Although most countries are developing land-based or air launched missiles to launch these HGVs or hypersonic cruise missiles, Pakistan is surprisingly pursuing a ship-based approach. Ship-based ballistic missiles are highly uncommon but considering that this capability will most likely be used in the conventional domain and not the strategic one, we can assume that the missiles will likely be deployed primarily for anti-surface warfare, with a secondary land-attack role. This may also point to the possibility that the Air Force and Army would only need to develop their own missiles for a triad, as the same HGV could commonly be used by all three services. The Navy’s missile would be smaller and more compact, so that it could be fitted onto ships, the Air Force would have to develop a new type of booster, even smaller than the Navy’s, that can be fitted onto J-10CP and JF-17A/B aircraft which would be able to propel the HGV to the edges of the atmosphere and hypersonic speeds. The Army, of course, would have to work the least, and can use the Navy-developed HGV from any of their existing missile platforms.
Since Pakistan has already mastered the art of developing advanced ballistic missiles, the real challenge is developing a hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV) that will be a payload to that missile. Hypersonic weapons, with their speed and unpredictability making them near impossible to intercept, would give the Pakistan Armed Forces the capability to (conventionally or otherwise) conduct unstoppable strikes on any type of targets anywhere on enemy territory, with the opponent’s reaction time reduced to almost nothing. Countermeasures to hypersonic weapons have not yet started development, as of 2019. Currently the hypersonic race is being led by Russia and China, followed by the U.S., and then France, Australia, India, Pakistan, Germany, and Japan.
Update on Project P-282
A letter has been shared online, issued by the Engineer-in-Chief’s office for an Expression of Interest (EOI) for “consultancy services for construction of an air conditioned workshop and storage facility for the P-282 missile system at PNMC Mauripur”. The construction of storage facilities for the weapons system means the missile might very close to being ready for testing. The P-282 missile has been described as “in the hypersonic domain” and a “ship-launched anti-ship and land attack ballistic missile” by the last CNS. The missile will initially arm Pakistan Navy’s Jinnah class frigates.
letter has been shared online, issued by the Engineer-in-Chief’s office for an Expression of Interest (EOI)
letter has been shared online, issued by the Engineer-in-Chief’s office for an Expression of Interest (EOI)
#WhiskeyPapa
#TeamPakistanStrategicForum


Pakistan Navy should omit site locations and other sensitive information when advertising.


PSF is nonsense ignore this bs
 

Falcon26

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All ballistic missiles are hypersonic. The P-282 is no different. Other than ability to attack ships, the P-282 is no different from Pakistan’s other ballistic missiles like the Shaheen series.

Pakistan is many years, perhaps decades, away from fielding a dedicated hypersonic missile.
 

khansaheeb

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All ballistic missiles are hypersonic. The P-282 is no different. Other than ability to attack ships, the P-282 is no different from Pakistan’s other ballistic missiles like the Shaheen series.

Pakistan is many years, perhaps decades, away from fielding a dedicated hypersonic missile.
Not if we get it off China earlier.
 

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