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Since 2000s IAF has lost 30 4th gen fighters compared to PAF 3

Myth_buster_1

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Nope.
Su-30 achieved over 200 per year even with lower availabilty rate.
If it had 70% availabilty rate it would achieved 250 hrs
No, thats flawed assessment. Su-30 having such low service hour of just 6,000 can not afford to overwork by 130% as it will deplete its 6,000 service hour much quicker and will be grounded for more maintenance much quicker.
 

Sc0lar_Vis@ri

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No, thats flawed assessment. Su-30 having such low service hour of just 6,000 can not afford to overwork by 130% as it will deplete its 6,000 service hour much quicker and will be grounded for more maintenance much quicker.
Shit yaar, if we had rafale we would have increased everything to 100%, bas khush?
 

Myth_buster_1

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Wrong USAF has not phased out any F-16 active duty unit in FY18 when F-16 availabilty was 72%.
Once an Indiot always an Indiot.

Two statuses are common to all (or most) air forces: active aircraft, and attrition (write-offs). Attrition will not be discussed in detail in this graph, as there are dedicated reports that cover this.

The US Air Force currently retains close to 1,200 F-16s in active service - slightly more than half of their total inventory. Most of the inactive aircraft were either lost due to attrition (more than 400 airframes), or where placed in storage in the Boneyard at Davis-Monthan AFB (more than 300 airframes). The US Air Force has also managed to sell or lease a significant amount of its retired aircraft to other operators (174 F-16s). This includes a number of aircraft that were transfered to the US Navy (after being embargoed for Pakistan), and 34 F-16 ADF aircraft for Italy. Quite unique for the USAF is the heavy use of retired F-16s as ground instruction aircraft (77 aircraft). Also quite exceptional: a large number of retired F-16s end up being preserved in museums or as gateguards.

Although the USAF has a large proportion of retired F-16s, it is by no means the air force with the largest active force reduction. That honour falls to Belgium, with only 60 F-16s active out of 160 originally delivered - or just 37.5%. The Netherlands are at exactly 50% active inventory today. In the case of Belgium, the active force was reduced significantly at the collapse of the Warsaw Pact and the end of the Cold War. Thirty-one aircraft were put in storage at Weelde AB in 1994. All of these aircraft were scrapped in 2005 in the dismantling center at Rocourt. In 2008, a further 16 active F-16 MLU aircraft were sold to Jordan with another 9 to follow in 2010.

Besides the US and Belgium, other two other air forces sold off part of their inventory: the Royal Netherlands Air Force, and the Republic of Singapore Air Force. The RNlAF sold 18 F-16s to Chile in 2007, 6 F-16s to Jordan in 2008 and another 18 F-16s to Chile in 2010, while the RSAF sold 7 F-16s to Thailand in 2007.

Two other air forces show a special status for (part of) their F-16 fleet. First, Pakistan still shows a number of embargoed F-16 aircraft, although the embargo has been lifted - 71 F-16 block 15OCU aircraft were embargoed by the US due to Pakistan's nuclear weapons program - twenty-eight of these aircraft were actually built, and flown straight to AMARC for storage. After several attempts to sell the aircraft to other air forces failed, the F-16s were re-assigned to the USAF and US Navy as aggressor aircraft. In the mean time, the embargo has been lifted and Pakistan has been allowed to place new orders for F-16 aircraft.

Two more air forces (besides USAF and BAF) stand out due to a relatively high number of stored aircraft: the Portuguese Air Force (PoAF) and the US Navy. The US Navy uses the F-16 exclusively as aggressors, a role which is extremely demanding on airframes since they spent most of their airborne time in high-G manouevres. As a result, US Navy F-16s are effectively spent after their design service live and are retired. The Portuguese Air Force has some airframes stored in anticipation of them being upgraded to MLU standards in the coming years.

Kid, data is for 1986-2020 so all aircrafts inducted in that period will be included. Only stupid peopel won't
Only Stupid people like you would include SU-30 LCA JF-17 and new F-16s that did not even exist in 1980s and 1990s.
 

Mighty Lion

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No, thats flawed assessment. Su-30 having such low service hour of just 6,000 can not afford to overwork by 130% as it will deplete its 6,000 service hour much quicker and will be grounded for more maintenance much quicker.
Actually Su-30 are overworked.
SB153 first flight in mid 2010 but entered overhaul in late 2018 in just 9.5 yrs it completed 1500 hrs.

IAF is not worried about 6000 flt hrs limit as MLU will increase it to 9K-10K hrs
 

Mighty Lion

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Once an Indiot always an Indiot.

Two statuses are common to all (or most) air forces: active aircraft, and attrition (write-offs). Attrition will not be discussed in detail in this graph, as there are dedicated reports that cover this.

The US Air Force currently retains close to 1,200 F-16s in active service - slightly more than half of their total inventory. Most of the inactive aircraft were either lost due to attrition (more than 400 airframes), or where placed in storage in the Boneyard at Davis-Monthan AFB (more than 300 airframes). The US Air Force has also managed to sell or lease a significant amount of its retired aircraft to other operators (174 F-16s). This includes a number of aircraft that were transfered to the US Navy (after being embargoed for Pakistan), and 34 F-16 ADF aircraft for Italy. Quite unique for the USAF is the heavy use of retired F-16s as ground instruction aircraft (77 aircraft). Also quite exceptional: a large number of retired F-16s end up being preserved in museums or as gateguards.

Although the USAF has a large proportion of retired F-16s, it is by no means the air force with the largest active force reduction. That honour falls to Belgium, with only 60 F-16s active out of 160 originally delivered - or just 37.5%. The Netherlands are at exactly 50% active inventory today. In the case of Belgium, the active force was reduced significantly at the collapse of the Warsaw Pact and the end of the Cold War. Thirty-one aircraft were put in storage at Weelde AB in 1994. All of these aircraft were scrapped in 2005 in the dismantling center at Rocourt. In 2008, a further 16 active F-16 MLU aircraft were sold to Jordan with another 9 to follow in 2010.

Besides the US and Belgium, other two other air forces sold off part of their inventory: the Royal Netherlands Air Force, and the Republic of Singapore Air Force. The RNlAF sold 18 F-16s to Chile in 2007, 6 F-16s to Jordan in 2008 and another 18 F-16s to Chile in 2010, while the RSAF sold 7 F-16s to Thailand in 2007.

Two other air forces show a special status for (part of) their F-16 fleet. First, Pakistan still shows a number of embargoed F-16 aircraft, although the embargo has been lifted - 71 F-16 block 15OCU aircraft were embargoed by the US due to Pakistan's nuclear weapons program - twenty-eight of these aircraft were actually built, and flown straight to AMARC for storage. After several attempts to sell the aircraft to other air forces failed, the F-16s were re-assigned to the USAF and US Navy as aggressor aircraft. In the mean time, the embargo has been lifted and Pakistan has been allowed to place new orders for F-16 aircraft.

Two more air forces (besides USAF and BAF) stand out due to a relatively high number of stored aircraft: the Portuguese Air Force (PoAF) and the US Navy. The US Navy uses the F-16 exclusively as aggressors, a role which is extremely demanding on airframes since they spent most of their airborne time in high-G manouevres. As a result, US Navy F-16s are effectively spent after their design service live and are retired. The Portuguese Air Force has some airframes stored in anticipation of them being upgraded to MLU standards in the coming years.



Only Stupid people like you would include SU-30 LCA JF-17 and new F-16s that did not even exist in 1980s and 1990s.
Epic fail kid.
Here is the real data:


Only stupid peopel like will exclude them from a comparison from 1986-2020 since all of them exist in 2020.

For example human mortality rate for 1986-2020 will include people who were born in 1986 as well as those born in 2018.
 

The Eagle

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If you guys are really interested to discuss as such; it will be appreciated to not to use words like Indiot or kid or wrong... or epic fail to argue which is nothing less than acting like a child lost a candy. The next thing is that; you don't have any rights to post in this thread.

Regards,
 

Myth_buster_1

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Actually Su-30 are overworked.
SB153 first flight in mid 2010 but entered overhaul in late 2018 in just 9.5 yrs it completed 1500 hrs.

IAF is not worried about 6000 flt hrs limit as MLU will increase it to 9K-10K hrs
You are using ONE Su-30 example which may have been an exceptional case .
Its like using TOP GUN fighter pilot hours which may be well over 400 per year to come up with average air force pilot.
 
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Mighty Lion

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You are using ONE Su-30 example which may have been an exceptional case with entire Su-30 fleet.
Its like using TOP GUN fighter pilot hours which may be well over 400 per year to come up with average air force pilot.
Actually SB153 had a below average use comapred to others.
It was not even deployed to TACDE.
 

Myth_buster_1

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Epic fail kid.
Here is the real data:
Whats the epic fail about this?
939 Active F-16 out of 1,200 total strength including 300+ air frame in storage/reserve.
Again, European AF f-16 availability rate is all time low.

Also what does this has to do with PAF F-16 availability rate which is much higher then USAF and other European AF.


Only stupid peopel like will exclude them from a comparison from 1986-2020 since all of them exist in 2020.
For example human mortality rate for 1986-2020 will include people who were born in 1986 as well as those born in 2018.
SU-30 new F-16 and JF-17 were not born in 1980s and 1990s thats why you only include them in a year in which they were born.
Its like you were born in 1970s but i include you in 1950s population.

Actually SB153 had a below average use comapred to others.
It was not even deployed to TACDE.
:woot::rofl::rofl::rofl:
You are a funny guy
 

Sulemanms202

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what load of utter BS from indian fellows as usual..

we are not taking time as variable here; its the professional capability of personnel. now you can bring time into equation. Over the time how many aircrafts have crashed (4th gen) given the size of personnel & budget now you can make table for conditional analysis or bayes theorem and work you'r way up !

Loosers!
 

dbc

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Last year when F-16C/D of RSAF reached Kalaikunda, they had fat higher downtime and 12hr breakdown rates than Su-30MKI.

No wonder USAF which has the best maintained F-16 fleet has a availability rate of only 72%.
I know I said I didn't have time for your nonsense - but I hate lies and deception.

The MC (Mission Capable rate) for the F-16 in 2018 was 70.03%. MC is defined as the readiness of the equipment or personnel to perform all missions assigned to the platform. It is very different from Aircraft availability rate which is typically much higher for all our platforms.

So if a F-16 ground crew is not certified on mounting the AGM-88 HARM as an example then that F-16 is not fully mission capable because it cannot hunt SAMs but the aircraft itself is available. We don't much care for aircraft availability rates it is not even tracked by USAF but we track the aircraft types MC (Mission Capable) rate closely. MC is not a metric to measure the reliability of our platform - we take it for granted. MC is meant to measure the mission readiness of the combat unit.

So the number you claim is the F-16's availability rate is actually its MC rate. No Russian fighter type has ever come remotely close to an MC of 70% - may be transports but not fighters.

I don't know if you deliberately misrepresented facts by stating the Mission Capable rate is the Availability rate - but please stop.


 

Falcon26

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I know I said I didn't have time for your nonsense - but I hate lies and deception.

The MC (Mission Capable rate) for the F-16 in 2018 was 70.03%. MC is defined as the readiness of the equipment or personnel to perform all missions assigned to the platform. It is very different from Aircraft availability rate which is typically much higher for all our platforms.

So if a F-16 ground crew is not certified on mounting the AGM-88 HARM as an example then that F-16 is not fully mission capable because it cannot hunt SAMs but the aircraft itself is available. We don't much care for aircraft availability rates it is not even tracked by USAF but we track the aircraft types MC (Mission Capable) rate closely. MC is not a metric to measure the reliability of our platform - we take it for granted. MC is meant to measure the mission readiness of the combat unit.

So the number you claim is the F-16's availability rate is actually its MC rate. No Russian fighter type has ever come remotely close to an MC of 70% - may be transports but not fighters.

I don't know if you deliberately misrepresented facts by stating the Mission Capable rate is the Availability rate - but please stop.


no point talking sense to this guy. He comes from a nation that still believes 350+ militants died at Balakot & that Abhinandan shot down an f-16. Of course, he’s gonna believe those bogus numbers he keeps repeating like a broken record.
 

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