What's new

Serious water shortage imminent as dry season continues

maithil

SENIOR MEMBER
May 21, 2010
2,201
-34
1,182
Country
India
Location
India
LAHORE: Water levels in Tarbela and Mangla dams have continued to decline due to no snow melting and almost no rainfall in the catchment areas in the ongoing and previous months.

There may be 30 to 40 per cent of water shortage in the country if the situation persists till April.

“The situation is very alarming as the water storage in Tarbela and Mangla reservoirs has considerably dropped due to below normal rains in the catchment areas and snow melting,” spokesperson for the Indus River System Authority (Irsa) Muhammad Khalid Rana told Dawn on Thursday.

“And if this situation persists till April, it will definitely disturb agriculture and power generation/distribution sectors. We’re already facing a 10 per cent water shortage; this is what we had predicted in October last due to below normal rain forecast.” As per statistics by the Water and Power Development Authority, the water storage and levels in Tarbela, Mangla and Chashma reservoirs and western rivers’ inflows massively dropped this year. The data also reflects a big increase in the water storage in Mangla on the basis of the average of the last five to 10 years.


Irsa official says water storage in Tarbela and Mangla reservoirs has dropped considerably
The data shows 1,409.52 feet water level in Tarbela, 1130.95 feet in Mangla and 644.00 feet in Chashma as recorded at 6am on Thursday. The minimum operating and maximum conservation levels in Tarbela, Mangla and Chashma are 1,392 and 1,550 feet, 1,050 and 1,242 feet and 638.15 and 649 feet, respectively. Last year, the water levels in Tarbela, Mangla and Chashma in the same months were at 1438.13 feet, 1167.35 feet and 644.80 feet.

Likewise the water level average in the last five and 10 years recorded in the aforementioned reservoirs remained as 1415.48 feet and 1415.66 feet, 1107.09 feet and 1102.85 feet and 641.50 feet and 642.20 feet respectively. The reservoir storage in million acres feet as recorded at 6am on Thursday was 0.257 MAF in Tarbela, 1.099 MAF in Mangla and 0.100 MAF in Chashma. These three reservoirs have maximum storage capacity of 5.980 MAF, 7.356 MAF and 0.278 MAF, respectively. Last year, in the same period, the water storage was recorded as 0.911 MAF, 2.539 MAF and 0.120 MAF.

Similarly, rivers’ inflows also show a massive decline this year when compared with the last year data. The data shows 168,000 cusecs inflow in the River Indus at Tarbela, 4,100 cusecs in the River Kabul at Nowshera, 174,000 cusecs in the River Jhelum at Mangla and 6,500 cusecs in the River Chenab at Marala as recorded on Thursday at 6am.

Last year’s inflows in the rivers were recorded as 223,000 cusecs, 154,000 cusecs, 204,000 cusecs and 164,000 cusecs. The last five and 10 year average data remained as 190,000 and 202,000 cusecs, 1210,00 and 141,000 cusecs, 184,000 and 207,000 cusecs and 123,000 and 163,000 cusecs.“The total water inflow in these rivers recorded on Thursday morning was 4.4 million cusecs whereas it was 7.4m cusecs last year. On an average, it, in total, was 6.1m cusecs and 7.1m cusecs in the last five and 10 years respectively. Moreover, the entire storage in MAF of Tarbela, Mangla and Chashma recorded on Thursday was 1.541 MAF while it was 3.602 MAF last year, 0.979 MAF (on average) in last 5 years and 0.928 MAF (on average) in last 10 years, the data explains.


According to a report, the anticipated water requirement for the Rabi season from Oct 1, 2020, to March 31, 2021, is 36.686 MAF whereas the availability is 35.632 MAF. Similarly, the anticipated system losses (seepage and evaporation) and anticipated Kotri barrage escape would be 2.501 MAF and 0.044 MAF. The overall shortage appears to be 10 per cent.

Punjab which requires 17.797 MAF during this period was supplied 10 per cent short of the requirement. Sindh, which needs 13.418 MAF, also received 10 per cent short supply. However, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan were given full allocation of 0.701 MAF and 1.171 MAF.

“KP and Balochistan are exempted from the shortage, as Irsa always fulfills their requirement. But Punjab and Sindh are facing 10 per cent water shortage,” Mr Rana maintained. The Irsa official said the authority’s advisory committee meeting will soon be held wherein the overall water situation will be discussed.

“In this meeting, the participants will assess the situation and forecast the exact shortage and availability of water,” he maintained. He said the water shortage forced growers to use tube wells for extracting water for irrigation purposes. But on the other hand, this lowers the underground water table. “So there should be rainfalls and rise in temperature for snow melting, otherwise the situation would be very problematic,” he warned.

 

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
4,578
17
6,586
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
The vast majority of the Pakistani population lives along a narrow band around the River Indus. There is Monsoon related flooding every few years. HUGE amount of water that, if stored, would go long ways in providing some insurance against future draughts. But, no, instead of taking advantage of the concentration of the population along such a narrow belt, morons have been ignoring that water is THE greatest resource and THE greatest danger to Pakistan.
 

Signalian

PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT
Aug 18, 2015
7,052
225
19,064
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
LAHORE: Water levels in Tarbela and Mangla dams have continued to decline due to no snow melting and almost no rainfall in the catchment areas in the ongoing and previous months.

There may be 30 to 40 per cent of water shortage in the country if the situation persists till April.

“The situation is very alarming as the water storage in Tarbela and Mangla reservoirs has considerably dropped due to below normal rains in the catchment areas and snow melting,” spokesperson for the Indus River System Authority (Irsa) Muhammad Khalid Rana told Dawn on Thursday.

“And if this situation persists till April, it will definitely disturb agriculture and power generation/distribution sectors. We’re already facing a 10 per cent water shortage; this is what we had predicted in October last due to below normal rain forecast.” As per statistics by the Water and Power Development Authority, the water storage and levels in Tarbela, Mangla and Chashma reservoirs and western rivers’ inflows massively dropped this year. The data also reflects a big increase in the water storage in Mangla on the basis of the average of the last five to 10 years.



The data shows 1,409.52 feet water level in Tarbela, 1130.95 feet in Mangla and 644.00 feet in Chashma as recorded at 6am on Thursday. The minimum operating and maximum conservation levels in Tarbela, Mangla and Chashma are 1,392 and 1,550 feet, 1,050 and 1,242 feet and 638.15 and 649 feet, respectively. Last year, the water levels in Tarbela, Mangla and Chashma in the same months were at 1438.13 feet, 1167.35 feet and 644.80 feet.

Likewise the water level average in the last five and 10 years recorded in the aforementioned reservoirs remained as 1415.48 feet and 1415.66 feet, 1107.09 feet and 1102.85 feet and 641.50 feet and 642.20 feet respectively. The reservoir storage in million acres feet as recorded at 6am on Thursday was 0.257 MAF in Tarbela, 1.099 MAF in Mangla and 0.100 MAF in Chashma. These three reservoirs have maximum storage capacity of 5.980 MAF, 7.356 MAF and 0.278 MAF, respectively. Last year, in the same period, the water storage was recorded as 0.911 MAF, 2.539 MAF and 0.120 MAF.

Similarly, rivers’ inflows also show a massive decline this year when compared with the last year data. The data shows 168,000 cusecs inflow in the River Indus at Tarbela, 4,100 cusecs in the River Kabul at Nowshera, 174,000 cusecs in the River Jhelum at Mangla and 6,500 cusecs in the River Chenab at Marala as recorded on Thursday at 6am.

Last year’s inflows in the rivers were recorded as 223,000 cusecs, 154,000 cusecs, 204,000 cusecs and 164,000 cusecs. The last five and 10 year average data remained as 190,000 and 202,000 cusecs, 1210,00 and 141,000 cusecs, 184,000 and 207,000 cusecs and 123,000 and 163,000 cusecs.“The total water inflow in these rivers recorded on Thursday morning was 4.4 million cusecs whereas it was 7.4m cusecs last year. On an average, it, in total, was 6.1m cusecs and 7.1m cusecs in the last five and 10 years respectively. Moreover, the entire storage in MAF of Tarbela, Mangla and Chashma recorded on Thursday was 1.541 MAF while it was 3.602 MAF last year, 0.979 MAF (on average) in last 5 years and 0.928 MAF (on average) in last 10 years, the data explains.


According to a report, the anticipated water requirement for the Rabi season from Oct 1, 2020, to March 31, 2021, is 36.686 MAF whereas the availability is 35.632 MAF. Similarly, the anticipated system losses (seepage and evaporation) and anticipated Kotri barrage escape would be 2.501 MAF and 0.044 MAF. The overall shortage appears to be 10 per cent.

Punjab which requires 17.797 MAF during this period was supplied 10 per cent short of the requirement. Sindh, which needs 13.418 MAF, also received 10 per cent short supply. However, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan were given full allocation of 0.701 MAF and 1.171 MAF.

“KP and Balochistan are exempted from the shortage, as Irsa always fulfills their requirement. But Punjab and Sindh are facing 10 per cent water shortage,” Mr Rana maintained. The Irsa official said the authority’s advisory committee meeting will soon be held wherein the overall water situation will be discussed.

“In this meeting, the participants will assess the situation and forecast the exact shortage and availability of water,” he maintained. He said the water shortage forced growers to use tube wells for extracting water for irrigation purposes. But on the other hand, this lowers the underground water table. “So there should be rainfalls and rise in temperature for snow melting, otherwise the situation would be very problematic,” he warned.

A Concerned Indian posting Pakistan news.
The vast majority of the Pakistani population lives along a narrow band around the River Indus. There is Monsoon related flooding every few years. HUGE amount of water that, if stored, would go long ways in providing some insurance against future draughts. But, no, instead of taking advantage of the concentration of the population along such a narrow belt, morons have been ignoring that water is THE greatest resource and THE greatest danger to Pakistan.
Rain is a blessing and a curse. It can become treacherous when it starts pouring while draughts can occur when it doesnt rain at all.
 

blueazure

FULL MEMBER
May 29, 2015
1,205
0
1,772
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
dambusters please !

JF 17 + dambuster heavy warhead cruise missiles with terrain mapping to hit ILLEGAL indian dams on OUR rivers in IOK !


PAF - please stop doing fly pasts and showboy cheap songs and abhinandan tea mockery ..... concentrate on DAM BUSTERS !!
 

Vanamali

BANNED
Jan 11, 2014
1,034
-17
524
Country
India
Location
India
dambusters please !

JF 17 + dambuster heavy warhead cruise missiles with terrain mapping to hit ILLEGAL indian dams on OUR rivers in IOK !


PAF - please stop doing fly pasts and showboy cheap songs and abhinandan tea mockery ..... concentrate on DAM BUSTERS !!
It will invite an unilateral cessation of IWT.... And you give chance to India to revise IWT which fair to both... Which actually reduces Pak share...
 

Meengla

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 1, 2009
4,578
17
6,586
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Rain is a blessing and a curse. It can become treacherous when it starts pouring while draughts can occur when it doesnt rain at all.
In the context of Pakistan, rain is a blessing and perhaps 'the more the merrier'. Pakistan, by the virtue of its population concentration along the Indus River, can and must utilize the rain water even as a strategic resource. Pakistan's population concentration gives advantages which are not dissimilar to the vast majority of Canada's population concentrated within few dozen miles of the US border and the Canadians have used that to put their resources better--- More Bang for their Bucks!
As I have said again and again in this forum--- if/when Pakistan manages its water resources then Pakistan has not much to worry about. And taking advantage of the narrow concentration of population along Indus River and the abundant monsoon rains every year gives Pakistan perhaps a strategic cushion against India's water blackmailing.
 

Turingsage

BANNED
Sep 28, 2014
1,543
-19
2,390
Country
India
Location
United Kingdom
The vast majority of the Pakistani population lives along a narrow band around the River Indus. There is Monsoon related flooding every few years. HUGE amount of water that, if stored, would go long ways in providing some insurance against future draughts. But, no, instead of taking advantage of the concentration of the population along such a narrow belt, morons have been ignoring that water is THE greatest resource and THE greatest danger to Pakistan.
I hope you will not take this as criticism but flooding is a necessary part of clearing the silt debris . If you dam everything silt and debris collects in the river bottom and the river slows and widens covering fertile shoreline lands. You can end up loosing vast fertile lands by inundating them with water and instead of gaining water you end up loosing land.
Both Pakistan and India are seeing the amount of water declining due to climate change. The melting glaciers in summer are greatly diminished in size and the amount each year that used to be held in ice is decreasing at a precipitous rate.
Climate change is going to hit South Asia hard.
 

blueazure

FULL MEMBER
May 29, 2015
1,205
0
1,772
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
I hope you will not take this as criticism but flooding is a necessary part of clearing the silt debris . If you dam everything silt and debris collects in the river bottom and the river slows and widens covering fertile shoreline lands. You can end up loosing vast fertile lands by inundating them with water and instead of gaining water you end up loosing land.
Both Pakistan and India are seeing the amount of water declining due to climate change. The melting glaciers in summer are greatly diminished in size and the amount each year that used to be held in ice is decreasing at a precipitous rate.
Climate change is going to hit South Asia hard.

yet the two nations with a collection population of 1.5 billion keep on fighting and never intent to resolve their issues .


india spends billions on arms purchases, only to be countered by pakistani purchase of an equal tech .

zero sum game !



only winners = dassault aviation/ lock heed / CAC


losers = poor folks of S ASIA

-----
No, except for Pak no one believes...
dont worry indian

u will believe once dam busters are flying
 

Deltadart

FULL MEMBER
May 22, 2016
519
0
692
Country
United States
Location
United States
I know the elected officials and the technocrats are very busy with other important issues, such as looting and plundering, but what are we doing with water desalination of our ocean water, if anything? It is keeping countries like Israel alive, so why can't we take advantage of this natural resource?
 

VCheng

ELITE MEMBER
Sep 29, 2010
39,660
55
34,081
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
I know the elected officials and the technocrats are very busy with other important issues, such as looting and plundering, but what are we doing with water desalination of our ocean water, if anything? It is keeping countries like Israel alive, so why can't we take advantage of this natural resource?
The cost of starting and then operating large scale desalinations plants, possibly?
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom