• Saturday, December 7, 2019

Seems Hoverbikes are for real this time!

Discussion in 'Members Club' started by integra, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. integra

    integra SENIOR MEMBER

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    Australian built Hoverbike prepares for takeoff

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    Adventurous motorcyclists might be familiar with the thrill of getting airborne at the top of a rise, but the Hoverbike is set to take catching some air to a whole new level. With a 1170 cc 4-stroke engine delivering 80 kW driving two ducted propellers, the inventor of the Hoverbike, Chris Malloy, says with its high thrust to weight ratio, the Hoverbike should be able to reach an estimated height of more than 10,000 feet and reach an indicated airspeed of 150 knots (278 km/h or 173 mph). At the moment these are only theoretical figures as the Hoverbike hasn't been put through its paces yet, but Malloy has constructed a prototype Hoverbike and plans to conduct real world flight tests in a couple of months.
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    Control of the Hoverbike is done completely via the handlebars. Forward and reverse movement is controlled via the motorbike-like handlebar grips. The right grip increases the thrust, while the left grip controls the angle of the control vanes positioned under the rotors to pitch the nose of the Hoverbike down - for forward movement - or up - for moving backwards. Meanwhile, turning is achieved by turning the handlebars left and right, just like a motorbike but with an extra axis that lets them rotate up and down a little, which alters the angle of the front and rear control vanes.

    With safety an obvious concern for airborne vehicles, Malloy says he has given as many components as possible triple redundancy and made the Hoverbike design as simple as possible. The current prototype doesn't feature adjustable pitch propellers so it cannot autorotate in the case of an engine failure, but Malloy says the ability to add two explosive parachutes to the Hoverbike's airfarme or have the rider wearing a parachute is a safer option.

    Malloy also says he plans to have the whole system controlled by gyros and he has already designed and partially tested the circuits and code required. But he initially wants to fine-tune the controls mechanically first to ensure he produces the most stable design. Eventually however, he says there will be room for a computer override of sorts to stop amateur pilots tipping over. The propellers, which are currently largely exposed, will also be fully covered in a mesh to ensure limbs don't get too near the blades.

    With dimensions of 3 m long by 1.3 m wide by 0.55 m high (9.8 x 4.3 x 1.8 ft), the Hoverbike weighs 105 kg (231 lb) and has a maximum takeoff weight of 270 kg 595 lb). Malloy claims the bike's 30 L primary fuel tank should provide a range of 148 km (92 miles) at a cruising speed of 80 kts (148 km/h or 92 mph), while the addition of secondary fuel tanks that double the fuel capacity will double the range.
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    Malloy told Gizmag he expects his Hoverbike will have nearly the same abilities as a helicopter and it should outperform a two-blade aircraft such as a Robinson R22 acrobatically, however, due to the decreased rotor size its fuel consumption will be higher.

    Although it sounds like it could be a lot of fun and would be a surefire way to beat traffic snarls, Malloy says he has designed the Hoverbike to be an airborne workhorse. Possible applications include aerial cattle mustering, search and rescue, aerial survey, film, power line inspection and military and emergency service.

    In what should help with the obvious regulatory hurdles that will need to be crossed before it takes to the skies, in the U.S. the Hoverbike will be classed as an ultralite, which means that it will not require a pilot's license to be flown.

    Malloy hopes to be able to get the Hoverbike into limited production within a year, with full production possible another two years after that. He anticipates a production run of at least 100 units a year would see the price of the vehicle at around US$40,000, with the price coming down to around that of a performance motorcycle if he's able to ramp up production to 1,000 units a year.

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    http://www.hover-bike.com/
     
  2. Ziras

    Ziras FULL MEMBER

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    its performance will depend on how fat you are
     
  3. integra

    integra SENIOR MEMBER

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    Well he quotes 130 kilo as carrying capacity.
    Only sumos will be left out I guess. Nevertheless if a proper Gyro
    is installed then there will be a new king on the streets for sure!

    Sad part is because he's still short of money that hoverbike
    is tied to the ground so that the prototype doesn't end up being broken.:lol:
     
  4. Ziras

    Ziras FULL MEMBER

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    dont you think 80kw from a 1100cc engine is a bit too much?
     
  5. integra

    integra SENIOR MEMBER

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    Well its around 100 HP from a 1100 cc thats not too
    much I guess. It should be naturally aspirated though
    as turbocharging will need air vectors.