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Saudi pressure prompts Pakistan to get tough with Iran



Saudi pressure prompts Pakistan to get tough with Iran​


Just days after Saudi Arabia's interior minister, Prince Abdulaziz bin Saud bin Naif, visited Pakistan armed with a list of demands from the Gulf kingdom, Islamabad sent its top spy to Tehran with a message: stop supporting proxy groups in the region, or else.
The message prompted a visit to Pakistan from Iran’s own interior minister, Ahmad Vahidi. The visit, which concluded on 16 February, included meetings with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, army chief Qamar Bajwa, and Vahidi’s opposite number, Sheikh Rashid Ahmed.
The tone taken by the Iranian delegation, which included the head of the border guards and other high-ranking officials, was conciliatory, said Umer Karim, visiting fellow at the Royal United Services Institute.
"The message was to the effect that if Iran doesn't stop providing a base for Baloch separatists and funding other proxies in the region, then Pakistan can reply in kind," Karim told Middle East Eye.

Militants and proxies​

On 2 February, militants from the Baloch Liberation Army (BLA) launched twin assaults on the bases of Pakistan's Frontier Corps, leading to days of fighting in the Pakistani province of Balochistan.

Why Pakistan might be about to side with Saudi Arabia against Iran
Read More »
Some Baloch separatists, who have long fought for a Balochistan independent of both Pakistan and Iran, are believed to have established bases in Iran, from which they mount attacks on Pakistan.
Islamabad's dissatisfaction at this state of affairs has helped Saudi attempts to undermine Iran in the region, with the Gulf kingdom also looking to battle Iranian influence.
One of Riyadh's main demands from Islamabad, Karim said, was to press Iran to stop recruiting young Shia men from Pakistan to fight for its interests, as has happened in Syria.
The Saudis fear that Pakistani fighters could now be trained and sent to replenish depleted Houthi forces in Yemen.
That pressure has pushed Iran to turn elsewhere, with Tehran said to be looking to recruit Shia men from Iraq to join the Houthis.

Pakistan acts on Iranian assets​

Pakistani intelligence has apprehended a substantial number of Iranian assets within the country, including a senior bureaucrat.
"The timing of this is obviously crucial: the Pakistanis would have known of this for a while, but owing to Saudi pressure decided to act now," said Karim.
'Pakistan wants to keep its hands clean of the any indication of sectarian alliances when it comes to boots on the ground, but they are training Saudi forces'
- Umer Karim, analyst
Nevertheless, Pakistan refused a Saudi Arabian proposal for joint special forces operations against the Houthis in Yemen, Karim said.
"Pakistan wants to keep its hands clean of any indication of sectarian alliances when it comes to boots on the ground, but they are training Saudi forces," the analyst said.
Soon after the Saudi interior minister's visit to Pakistan, a contingent of Saudi armed forces arrived in Pakistan to start a two-month-long comprehensive joint mechanised training exercise near the city of Multan, in southern Punjab.
"Multan is one of Pakistan's main strike corps, consisting of tank divisions with heavy artillery support. This is a clear indication that Pakistan is training Saudi forces for what could be a major incursion into Yemen," said Karim.

New defence deals​

The Saudi civil and military leadership is looking for a range of partners to fill the vacuum left by the United States, which removed its most advanced missile defence system and Patriot batteries from the Gulf kingdom last year.
On 14 February, the commander of the Royal Saudi Land Forces, Lieutenant General Fahd Bin Abdullah Mohammed al-Mutair, arrived in India on a landmark visit. It was the first time a serving Saudi army chief had visited India, and was seen as confirmation of the deepening military cooperation between the two countries.
There was something curious about the official photograph taken to mark al-Mutair’s meeting with Indian army chief General Manoj Mukund Naravane.
Pic12022-02-15YQU1.jpeg
Saudi armed forces chief General Fahd Bin Abdullah Mohammed al-Mutair meets Indian army chief General Manoj Mukund Naravane (Indian Ministry of Defence)
The two men are sitting in front of a framed photograph of then-Pakistani military commander General AAK Niazi signing surrender documents after losing the 1971 war that led to the creation of Bangladesh.
Indian military officials surround Niazi, who was supported by Saudi Arabia at the time.
"The Indians are suggesting that the Saudis are turning to them after being disappointed by Pakistan. But it can be seen as an insult to the Saudis, who were supporting Pakistan in that war," Karim told MEE.
'Usually the Saudis haven't asked for reciprocity, but this time around we have heard that there is no free lunch'
- Ahmed Qureshi, Pakistani broadcaster
Islamabad-based analyst Ahmed Qureshi, who is an expert on Pakistani-Saudi relations and reports for Pakistan's state broadcaster PTV, says Indian overtures to Saudi Arabia with regards to Yemen are not new.
"During [Saudi crown prince] Mohammed bin Salman's trip to India in 2019, it wasn't made public, the Indians did offer Saudi Arabia some sort of help for the Yemen conflict, this was confirmed to me by a Saudi journalist. The Saudi leadership, however, thanked India but did not respond to the offer,” Qureshi told MEE.
An English-language newspaper in Pakistan reported ongoing discussions on a visit by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman to Pakistan in March, likely to coincide with the country's national day on 23 March.
The Pakistani foreign office told MEE that there was no official confirmation of the visit yet.

Pakistan's role in the Gulf​

"Saudis feel that Pakistan should have a bigger role in the security of Gulf countries, something similar to Egypt," said Qureshi. "From what I know, Pakistan has agreed."
But Pakistan, Qureshi said, already has several military cooperation agreements with Saudi Arabia, some of which date back to the 1960s.
"Pakistan is also a member of the US Navy's 5th Fleet alliance, which patrols the North Arabian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden, they have repeatedly intercepted Iranian weapons bound for Yemen," Qureshi told MEE.
He added that Pakistan and Saudi Arabia have been in discussions about a possible technology transfer of Pakistan's domestically manufactured drones.

A Karachi gangster turned Tehran spy highlights complicated Pakistan-Iran ties
Read More »
Diplomatically, Qureshi said, Pakistan has recently declared the Houthis a terrorist organisation and directly condemned Houthi missile and drone attacks.
Pakistan's historically neutral policy towards Saudi Arabia and Iran has clearly shifted.
This is partly because of the increasingly brazen attacks against Pakistani security forces by Iran-based Baloch rebels. Those attacks have seen hundreds of Pakistani soldiers killed over the last couple of years.
But Qureshi says there's another reason.
"Usually the Saudis haven't asked for reciprocity, but this time around we have heard that there is no free lunch," he said.
Earlier this year, Saudi Arabia loaned Pakistan $3bn to bolster the country's dwindling foreign exchange reserves - the loan is repayable in a year on a relatively high-interest rate of four percent.
With that kind of financial leverage at its disposal, it's no wonder Pakistan is responding to Saudi diplomacy, with the leadership in Islamabad hoping that a visit from Mohammed bin Salman will help ease Pakistan's economic woes.
 

Muhammed45

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This website is based in Arizona , USA and is obviously a platform for propaganda against Pakistan-Iran relationship. There has been a steep spike in anti-Iran propaganda trying to drive a wedge between Pakistan and Iran. The website gives no names of any staff , no address and is some clandestine operation.

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USA's main strategy is spreading wars, look at east of Europe, South China sea and middle east. They have been harboring terrorism around Iranian borders. They have their paid elements everywhere.
 

Chak Bamu

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Pakistan has made a terrible mistake not helping Saudis crush Houtis.

I have never liked Iran’s role when it came to Balochistan. We have never benefited anything from Iran. Saudis have helped us enormously through out their history. One time they asked us for help we said no….. disgrace and stupid .

This was an absolute disaster Nawaz created by using his non existent foreign policy skills. IK made an equally large blunder by siding with Malaysia and Turkey in joining non existent Islamic alliance . ….. it was so unnecessary and useless and obviously we are going to pay for it.
Staying out of Yemen was a good decision. Pakistan's focus at that time was to build momentum for economic growth. Joining a misadventure which had potential for sectarian blow-back was the last thing Pakistan needed at the time.

Some people talk big about strategy but forget everything about stability & economy. They are often the same people who have no respect for Pakistan's constitution & institutional set up. The decision to stay out of Yemen was made after a debate in the parliament. You are calling it a bad decision because you have zero respect for national institutions.

Pakistan's refusal to join the Yemen war shifted the onus on to Iran & they did not appreciate the burden. Now that Iran has carelessly allowed (encouraged?) attacks on Pakistan from its soil, there is a price to pay.

We can never trust Iran & we can not expect Iran to stay neutral in matters pertaining to Pakistan. Our parliament's decision was crucial in ensuring that this be well-demonstrated to the world to see.
 

Chak Bamu

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USA's main strategy is spreading wars, look at east of Europe, South China sea and middle east. They have been harboring terrorism around Iranian borders. They have their paid elements everywhere.
My friend, I have been watching Iranian actions since 1979 at least. I don't exactly see Iranian mullahs distributing flowers in the region. Since 1979 Iran's agenda has been sectarian & history shows it.

Had Iranians not occupied the US embassy to take the staff hostage, tried their best to export its revolution, & push sectarian agenda, the region would be a true power-house today. But we know what happened instead.
 

Goritoes

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Its still not late to enter Yemen War, if Pakistani Govt gave up for the Sectarian Lobbies than it will be a loss for Pakistan, Pakistan's future is with Muslims not Iran.
 

Muhammed45

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My friend, I have been watching Iranian actions since 1979 at least. I don't exactly see Iranian mullahs distributing flowers in the region. Since 1979 Iran's agenda has been sectarian & history shows it.

Had Iranians not occupied the US embassy to take the staff hostage, tried their best to export its revolution, & push sectarian agenda, the region would be a true power-house today. But we know what happened instead.
The Islamic revolution started with Prophet Muhammed's PBUH revolt against Kuffar of Quraysh in Arabian peninsula and it will never stop even after 1400 years. Revolution has its consequences, our prophet lost his beloved uncle Hamza and his beloved wife to sanctions of Quraysh. His wife who was the wealthiest Arab woman of her own times died of hunger in the process. The question is, was that worth of tolerating all those loss? Yes it was. And we are on the verge of reviving that civilization.

Palestine, Yemen, Kashmir etc. They are all symbols of systematic oppression against Muslim masses mostly and fundamentally led by USA.
 

Chak Bamu

RETIRED MOD
Jan 3, 2013
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Saudi pressure prompts Pakistan to get tough with Iran​


Just days after Saudi Arabia's interior minister, Prince Abdulaziz bin Saud bin Naif, visited Pakistan armed with a list of demands from the Gulf kingdom, Islamabad sent its top spy to Tehran with a message: stop supporting proxy groups in the region, or else.
The message prompted a visit to Pakistan from Iran’s own interior minister, Ahmad Vahidi. The visit, which concluded on 16 February, included meetings with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, army chief Qamar Bajwa, and Vahidi’s opposite number, Sheikh Rashid Ahmed.
The tone taken by the Iranian delegation, which included the head of the border guards and other high-ranking officials, was conciliatory, said Umer Karim, visiting fellow at the Royal United Services Institute.
"The message was to the effect that if Iran doesn't stop providing a base for Baloch separatists and funding other proxies in the region, then Pakistan can reply in kind," Karim told Middle East Eye.

Militants and proxies​

On 2 February, militants from the Baloch Liberation Army (BLA) launched twin assaults on the bases of Pakistan's Frontier Corps, leading to days of fighting in the Pakistani province of Balochistan.

Why Pakistan might be about to side with Saudi Arabia against Iran
Read More »
Some Baloch separatists, who have long fought for a Balochistan independent of both Pakistan and Iran, are believed to have established bases in Iran, from which they mount attacks on Pakistan.
Islamabad's dissatisfaction at this state of affairs has helped Saudi attempts to undermine Iran in the region, with the Gulf kingdom also looking to battle Iranian influence.
One of Riyadh's main demands from Islamabad, Karim said, was to press Iran to stop recruiting young Shia men from Pakistan to fight for its interests, as has happened in Syria.
The Saudis fear that Pakistani fighters could now be trained and sent to replenish depleted Houthi forces in Yemen.
That pressure has pushed Iran to turn elsewhere, with Tehran said to be looking to recruit Shia men from Iraq to join the Houthis.

Pakistan acts on Iranian assets​

Pakistani intelligence has apprehended a substantial number of Iranian assets within the country, including a senior bureaucrat.
"The timing of this is obviously crucial: the Pakistanis would have known of this for a while, but owing to Saudi pressure decided to act now," said Karim.

Nevertheless, Pakistan refused a Saudi Arabian proposal for joint special forces operations against the Houthis in Yemen, Karim said.
"Pakistan wants to keep its hands clean of any indication of sectarian alliances when it comes to boots on the ground, but they are training Saudi forces," the analyst said.
Soon after the Saudi interior minister's visit to Pakistan, a contingent of Saudi armed forces arrived in Pakistan to start a two-month-long comprehensive joint mechanised training exercise near the city of Multan, in southern Punjab.
"Multan is one of Pakistan's main strike corps, consisting of tank divisions with heavy artillery support. This is a clear indication that Pakistan is training Saudi forces for what could be a major incursion into Yemen," said Karim.

New defence deals​

The Saudi civil and military leadership is looking for a range of partners to fill the vacuum left by the United States, which removed its most advanced missile defence system and Patriot batteries from the Gulf kingdom last year.
On 14 February, the commander of the Royal Saudi Land Forces, Lieutenant General Fahd Bin Abdullah Mohammed al-Mutair, arrived in India on a landmark visit. It was the first time a serving Saudi army chief had visited India, and was seen as confirmation of the deepening military cooperation between the two countries.
There was something curious about the official photograph taken to mark al-Mutair’s meeting with Indian army chief General Manoj Mukund Naravane.
Pic12022-02-15YQU1.jpeg
Saudi armed forces chief General Fahd Bin Abdullah Mohammed al-Mutair meets Indian army chief General Manoj Mukund Naravane (Indian Ministry of Defence)
The two men are sitting in front of a framed photograph of then-Pakistani military commander General AAK Niazi signing surrender documents after losing the 1971 war that led to the creation of Bangladesh.
Indian military officials surround Niazi, who was supported by Saudi Arabia at the time.
"The Indians are suggesting that the Saudis are turning to them after being disappointed by Pakistan. But it can be seen as an insult to the Saudis, who were supporting Pakistan in that war," Karim told MEE.

Islamabad-based analyst Ahmed Qureshi, who is an expert on Pakistani-Saudi relations and reports for Pakistan's state broadcaster PTV, says Indian overtures to Saudi Arabia with regards to Yemen are not new.
"During [Saudi crown prince] Mohammed bin Salman's trip to India in 2019, it wasn't made public, the Indians did offer Saudi Arabia some sort of help for the Yemen conflict, this was confirmed to me by a Saudi journalist. The Saudi leadership, however, thanked India but did not respond to the offer,” Qureshi told MEE.
An English-language newspaper in Pakistan reported ongoing discussions on a visit by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman to Pakistan in March, likely to coincide with the country's national day on 23 March.
The Pakistani foreign office told MEE that there was no official confirmation of the visit yet.

Pakistan's role in the Gulf​

"Saudis feel that Pakistan should have a bigger role in the security of Gulf countries, something similar to Egypt," said Qureshi. "From what I know, Pakistan has agreed."
But Pakistan, Qureshi said, already has several military cooperation agreements with Saudi Arabia, some of which date back to the 1960s.
"Pakistan is also a member of the US Navy's 5th Fleet alliance, which patrols the North Arabian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden, they have repeatedly intercepted Iranian weapons bound for Yemen," Qureshi told MEE.
He added that Pakistan and Saudi Arabia have been in discussions about a possible technology transfer of Pakistan's domestically manufactured drones.

A Karachi gangster turned Tehran spy highlights complicated Pakistan-Iran ties
Read More »
Diplomatically, Qureshi said, Pakistan has recently declared the Houthis a terrorist organisation and directly condemned Houthi missile and drone attacks.
Pakistan's historically neutral policy towards Saudi Arabia and Iran has clearly shifted.
This is partly because of the increasingly brazen attacks against Pakistani security forces by Iran-based Baloch rebels. Those attacks have seen hundreds of Pakistani soldiers killed over the last couple of years.
But Qureshi says there's another reason.
"Usually the Saudis haven't asked for reciprocity, but this time around we have heard that there is no free lunch," he said.
Earlier this year, Saudi Arabia loaned Pakistan $3bn to bolster the country's dwindling foreign exchange reserves - the loan is repayable in a year on a relatively high-interest rate of four percent.
With that kind of financial leverage at its disposal, it's no wonder Pakistan is responding to Saudi diplomacy, with the leadership in Islamabad hoping that a visit from Mohammed bin Salman will help ease Pakistan's economic woes.

First, it is not Saudi pressure but Pakistan's self-interest. The headline is wrong & purposefully inflammatory.

Second, Pakistan has an unwritten agreement with KSA for its security. This has been in place since '60s & especially since the Iranian revolution in 1979.

Third, Pakistan needs to do something about the terrorism being supported from Iranian soil. No better way than to let Iran know by deeds that it crossed a line. Iran has always picked India over Pakistan, going as far as supporting India over the issue of Kashmir to the detriment of Kashmiris. Ironic that Iran projects itself as a sectarian Shia power, while a sizeable number of Kashmiris are Shias.

Fourth, GCC countries have relations with India that predate partition & creation of Pakistan. We should not be insecure about it. But I relish the fact that Indian leadership have made a point to show their true selves. Arabs know where their interests lie.

The Islamic revolution started with Prophet Muhammed's PBUH revolt against Kuffar of Quraysh in Arabian peninsula and it will never stop even after 1400 years. Revolution has its consequences, our prophet lost his beloved uncle Hamza and his beloved wife to sanctions of Quraysh. His wife who was the wealthiest Arab woman of her own times died of hunger in the process. The question is, was that worth of tolerating all those loss? Yes it was. And we are on the verge of reviving that civilization.

Palestine, Yemen, Kashmir etc. They are all symbols of systematic oppression against Muslim masses mostly and fundamentally led by USA.
Then why call the Iranian revolution Islamic? This rather proves my point. The Iranian setup is sectarian & its policies are driven by mullahs. This has been the bane of the middle east politics. Earlier, it was just ethnic/cultural hubris & knowing Iran's history, it was tolerable. Since 1979, Iranians have repackaged their policies in a garb of sectarianism & appropriated religious language to give a veneer to it.

I can read between the lines, you know.
 

Qutb-ud-din-Aibak

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First, it is not Saudi pressure but Pakistan's self-interest. The headline is wrong & purposefully inflammatory.

Second, Pakistan has an unwritten agreement with KSA for its security. This has been in place since '60s & especially since the Iranian revolution in 1979.

Third, Pakistan needs to do something about the terrorism being supported from Iranian soil. No better way than to let Iran know by deeds that it crossed a line. Iran has always picked India over Pakistan, going as far as supporting India over the issue of Kashmir to the detriment of Kashmiris. Ironic that Iran projects itself as a sectarian Shia power, while a sizeable number of Kashmiris are Shias.

Fourth, GCC countries have relations with India that predate partition & creation of Pakistan. We should not be insecure about it. But I relish the fact that Indian leadership have made a point to show their true selves. Arabs know where their interests lie.


Then why call the Iranian revolution Islamic? This rather proves my point. The Iranian setup is sectarian & its policies are driven by mullahs. This has been the bane of the middle east politics. Earlier, it was just ethnic/cultural hubris & knowing Iran's history, it was tolerable. Since 1979, Iranians have repackaged their policies in a garb of sectarianism & appropriated religious language to give a veneer to it.

I can read between the lines, you know.

middle-easteye or whatever that website is called is dog-shxt and should be barred from PDF they have been posting alot of garbage thru out the years.. They mix 1 fact with 99 lies absolute garbage news and the same with middle east monitor including eurasiantimes
 

khansaheeb

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the website HQ is based in London UK. web host is godaddy.

OMG! in defense of Iran you have gone somewhat over the top in lying. I shan't say anymore lest I get banned again. it is a cardinal sin to tell the truth here.
OK , go to "about us" on the website and show me the names of any staff. All legitimate organizations provide list of their staff. I think you should apologize for accusing me of lying. Looking at your defense of it , is it your website?
 
Last edited:

Muhammed45

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Then why call the Iranian revolution Islamic? This rather proves my point. The Iranian setup is sectarian & its policies are driven by mullahs. This has been the bane of the middle east politics. Earlier, it was just ethnic/cultural hubris & knowing Iran's history, it was tolerable. Since 1979, Iranians have repackaged their policies in a garb of sectarianism & appropriated religious language to give a veneer to it.

I can read between the lines, you know.
Let us agree to disagree sir. Iranian revolution is Islamic never opposed to Sunnis.

You may not be aware that Iranian forces and Syrian forces have Sunnis in their ranks by thousands.
Sunnis of Iraq wholeheartedly supported Iran in the face of USA.
Sheikh Hamed : When ISIS attacked Iraq, it was only Iran that helped us. Note he is a Sunni cleric. Listen to him, you wouldn't hear this in other media

Sunnis of Syria support Iran led assault on terrorists.
13940615_1230676.jpg


So, please don't call us sectarians. Our fight against AQ and ISIS with their tens of foreign elements is not a sectarian matter.
 

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