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Saint Martin’s island's jetty requires a quick repair

bluesky

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Saint Martin’s island's jetty requires a quick repair
A CORRESPONDENT | Published: October 14, 2021 09:52:41
Photo shows the broken part of the jetty in Saint Martin's Island — FE Photo
Photo shows the broken part of the jetty in Saint Martin's Island — FE Photo


COX'S BAZAR, Oct 13: An accident may happen in Teknaf's Saint Martin's Island as its old, damaged, and poorly-maintained jetty can completely collapse anytime, feared the locals of the only coral island of Bangladesh.

Saint Martin's sees more tourists with the peak season starting from October and ending in March. This jetty, by which people enter and embark from the ships on the island, used to attract thousands of tourists once. However, its dilapidated condition is now causing sufferings to tourists from home and abroad, said one of the locals.

On November 15, 2007, the jetty's parking point and two girders were heavily damaged by cyclone Sidr. Since then, the jetty has become risky. The impact of cyclones and tidal waves has been battering the jetty, making it almost unusable. Small and big cracks can be found everywhere. Most parts of the jetty, railings, and stairs have been damaged. “However, no initiative has so far been taken to repair it”, he added.

The 300-metre jetty was set up in the fiscal year 2002-03 under the supervision of the Local Government Engineering Department for the convenience of Saint Martin's residents and tourists visiting the island.

Habibur Rahman, a local UP (union parishad) member, said, "The jetty has become a death trap for us. Its poor condition can any time cause a big accident."

According to UP chairman Nur Ahmed, they informed the concerned department for repairing the jetty quickly, but no action has been taken yet.

“Although the district council earns a lot of money every year by leasing this jetty, it has not undertaken any kind of repair work”, he said. The chairman also alleged that the district council does not repair the jetty from its own budget but collects money from the ship owners.

Asked about this, Teknaf Upazila Nirbahi Officer (UNO) Parvez Chowdhury said, "The jetty has been in a dilapidated condition for a long time. Recently, I, myself, have visited the jetty, and sent a proposal to the ministry to repair it. Besides, the ship owners and Karnafuli Shipyard have agreed to cooperate to complete the work. We also want to get the job done quickly."

Cox's Bazar District Council chief executive Hillol Biswas said, "A huge amount of revenue is collected through this jetty. However, the jetty has become unusable long ago. A project proposal worth Tk 17.2 million (1.72 crore) has been sent to the ministry for its repair works. Once approved, we will arrange the tender process. Then the repair work will start."

However, the businessmen who have made investments centring the island are spending their days hopelessly because of this jetty and fear of low turnouts of tourists.

According to them, if any kind of accident happens due to the damaged jetty, the tourism business will fall flat this island, and at least 30,000 people's livelihoods and employment will be at risk. If the jetty is not repaired in a short time, the tourism industry will suffer and the government will lose a huge amount of revenue, they concluded.

tahjibulanam18@gmail.com
 

bluesky

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1634330360534.png


The GoB will certainly look after the repairing of this jetty before it claims to be at par with countries like DENMARK.

Our great patriotic PDF members may feel shy of this broken jetty and that Hasina Bibi is all talk of tremendous development of Golden Bangladesh.

It is a sorry country!!
 

Bilal9

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View attachment 785352

The GoB will certainly look after the repairing of this jetty before it claims to be at par with countries like DENMARK.

Our great patriotic PDF members may feel shy of this broken jetty and that Hasina Bibi is all talk of tremendous development of Golden Bangladesh.

It is a sorry country!!
Using cheap third rate cement not meant for marine use and also using rust prone re-bar (tor steel rod) for RCC. You have to use Fiberglass re-bar, they are not that much more expensive and they don't rust. We have Ullus for administrators in Bangladesh, bunch of sagols,

Fiberglass Re-bar

Marine cement

Seawall and dock contractor
 
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Oct 27, 2014
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View attachment 785352

The GoB will certainly look after the repairing of this jetty before it claims to be at par with countries like DENMARK.

Our great patriotic PDF members may feel shy of this broken jetty and that Hasina Bibi is all talk of tremendous development of Golden Bangladesh.

It is a sorry country!!
Don’t worry it’s a perfect opportunity to capitalize on the mega project for bongopapa shake mujibur rahman Saint Martin shonar bangla shorner tukra jetty
 

bluesky

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Using cheap third rate cement not meant for marine use and also using rust prone re-bar (tor steel rod) for RCC. You have to use Fiberglass re-bar, they are not that much more expensive and they don't rust. We have Ullus for administrators in Bangladesh, bunch of sagols,

Fiberglass Re-bar

Marine cement

Seawall and dock contractor
High alumina cement is the best cement for using as material for constructions near the sea. Note also that the picture shows rusts in those THIN re-bars. So, at least a 2" concrete covering is needed to protect the steel bars.

The re-bars are thin and are widely spaced that also made the concrete crack and fall.
 

Bilal9

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High alumina cement is the best cement for using as material for constructions near the sea. Note also that the picture shows rusts in those THIN re-bars. So, at least a 2" concrete covering is needed to protect the steel bars.

The re-bars are thin and are widely spaced that also made the concrete crack and fall.
Great comment @bluesky bhai.

The idiot civil engineer who okayed the structural plans for this jetty should be tarred, feathered, dabbed with choon/kali and then placed on a donkey facing backward and paraded through town. Shame!

BTW Is it common in Japan to use fiberglass reinforcing rods for RCC work? In the US it is nowadays quite common.
 

bluesky

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Great comment @bluesky bhai.

The idiot civil engineer who okayed the structural plans for this jetty should be tarred, feathered, dabbed with choon/kali and then placed on a donkey facing backward and paraded through town. Shame!

BTW Is it common in Japan to use fiberglass reinforcing rods for RCC work? In the US it is nowadays quite common.
Fiberglass rebars are corrosion-resistant. As far as I know, its uses are limited to certain specialized structures. In my case, I have not encountered a construction where this rebar was used. So, my knowledge is limited, but I think as it may be expensive its use is limited.

By the way, I am not sure if high alumina cement is readily available in BD. So, this is my personal opinion that normal Portland Cement can also be used to protect the concrete and rebars from getting corrosion.

I have specified the use of Portland Cement in the underground structures, for example concrete piles, but the quantity is very high, @400kg per m3 of raw concrete. This dense concrete resists the acidic soil from eating through the concrete and rust the pile rebars. In normal alkaline soil, roughly speaking, only about 250 kg in each m3 is used.

Perhaps, you know some soil is acidic and some alkaline in nature which is determined alongwith the soil investigation by Standard Penetration Tests (SPT).

1634552474494.png


About engineering practices in BD, I don't think engineers know how to do design analysis of a structure. Japanese companies regularly get foreign contracts and the Design Specifications specify which Codes and Standards to use.

Usually, it is American Codes like ACI, ASCE, AASHTO, ASTM, British BS codes. I have also encountered FN (Norma French) in an Algerian Paper Mills project and DIN (Germany) in a Hungary project. Design procedures and assumptions in the analysis may differ in all these Codes, but the end results are almost the same.

Now, how about BD engineers. They have a graduation certificate and they assume they are already good engineers. So, international standards like ACI is not followed. It is a Bible for every design engineer, but I suspect our engineers don't even know about it.

Note the thickness of the slab and the diameter of rebars. As far as I see there is also only one layer of thin rebars (13mm?) instead of using a mandatory two layers in the load-bearing slabs. The lower rebars withstand the loads and the upper ones resist cracks due to temperature differences between days and night.

Slab thickness looks like a slate when it should be at least 15cm (6"). Otherwise, it cannot take the vertical shear force. So, you can see all are broken.

Rebar diameter and spacing must be calculated out by doing design analysis of the slab. And ACI stipulates that re-bars design must be checked against the ACI minimum requirement which is (2% x slab cross-sectional area). This has not been followed.
 
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Bilal9

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Fiberglass rebars are corrosion-resistant. As far as I know, its uses are limited to certain specialized structures. In my case, I have not encountered a construction where this rebar was used. So, my knowledge is limited, but I think as it may be expensive its use is limited.

By the way, I am not sure if high alumina cement is readily available in BD. So, this is my personal opinion that normal Portland Cement can also be used to protect the concrete and rebars from getting corrosion.

I have specified the use of Portland Cement in the underground structures, for example concrete piles, but the quantity is very high, @400kg per m3 of raw concrete. This dense concrete resists the acidic soil from eating through the concrete and rust the pile rebars. In normal alkaline soil, roughly speaking, only about 250 kg in each m3 is used.

Perhaps, you know some soil is acidic and some alkaline in nature which is determined alongwith the soil investigation by Standard Penetration Tests (SPT).

View attachment 785852

About engineering practices in BD, I don't think engineers know how to do design analysis of a structure. Japanese companies regularly get foreign contracts and the Design Specifications specify which Codes and Standards to use.

Usually, it is American Codes like ACI, ASCE, AASHTO, ASTM, British BS codes. I have also encountered FN (Norma French) in an Algerian Paper Mills project and DIN (Germany) in a Hungary project. Design procedures and assumptions in the analysis may differ in all these Codes, but the end results are almost the same.

Now, how about BD engineers. They have a graduation certificate and they assume they are already good engineers. So, international standards like ACI is not followed. It is a Bible for every design engineer, but I suspect our engineers don't even know about it.

Note the thickness of the slab and the diameter of rebars. As far as I see there is also only one layer of thin rebars (13mm?) instead of using a mandatory two layers in the load-bearing slabs. The lower rebars withstand the loads and the upper ones resist cracks due to temperature differences between days and night.

Slab thickness looks like a slate when it should be at least 15cm (6"). Otherwise, it cannot take the vertical shear force. So, you can see all are broken.

Rebar diameter and spacing must be calculated out by doing design analysis of the slab. And ACI stipulates that re-bars design must be checked against the ACI minimum requirement which is (2% x slab cross-sectional area). This has not been followed.
@bluesky bhai, the less said about our engineers, the better.

They see passing a diploma engg. course as a pre-requisite for bribe-induced fortune building and are limited to paying 'hazira' to the office once a day, sign some papers and sit on a big chair ordering ardalees (office errand boys) to bring them tea and drinks.

The difference I see in the West (mostly US so far) is stark. These civil engg. guys compete with each other on skill building and are rewarded by promotions and raises for gaining skills and relevant certifications by mandate. I haven't met a civil engineer under the age of 40 here, who does not know basics of the standards you talked about and they genuinely pride themselves on skills/knowledge of AutoCAD and other software packages, which is routinely exchanged for plans. Anything less would be a shame professionally.

In Bangladesh AutoCAD is the domain of specialists, and then only in private companies. The most any diploma engineering graduate knows in Bangladesh is, how to read construction blueprints and plans, which is the domain of low level site construction supervisors in the US.

Diploma engineer older people in govt. are even more gadha, having almost zero technical skills. I have spoken to quite a few back in the day and their knowledge is less than mine, and I'm no engineer.

This is the legacy we have in Bangladesh, building a pyramid scheme of bribe based approvals, reaching all the way to the top in any govt. organizations, giving jobs, promotions and rewards (and opportunities for bribes) only based on who knows who, rather than on merit. The result is an untenable administration, looking at expensive foreign consultants and contractors for basic structures like bridges.

Even with the advent of technology, where govt. approvals should be automatic in the age of e-governance, they are not, leaving room to pay someone a bribe or "speed money".

By the way, fiberglass re-bars are only slightly more expensive than steel re-bars in the US and are in widespread use, in residential as well as commercial/industrial construction. In California, like in Japan, civil engg. standards call for earthquake resistant slabs. I have seen two layer fiberglass re-bar mesh in most residential slabs.

In cases where steel re-bars are used in residential slabs, I have seen the use of tensioning the re-bars (post-tensioning?) before the cement mixer truck arrives. Typically, they use 4000 PSI cement mix for residential slab use in California, and much stronger mix for commercial slabs.
 

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