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S Asia in climate change 'crisis'

su-47

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A Greenpeace report on climate change says that if greenhouse gas emissions grow at their present rate, South Asia could face a major human crisis.

"More than 120 million people from India and Bangladesh alone will become homeless by the end of this century," the report says.

It estimates that 75 million people from Bangladesh will lose their homes.

It predicts that about 45 million people in India will also become "climate migrants".

Intense cyclones

The report says that the number of people who could be affected by climate change is almost 10 times greater than the number of people who migrated during and after the partition of India in 1947.

Around 130 million people now live in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh in what are called low elevation coastal zones, which comprise coastal regions that are less than 10m above average sea level.

"There is already plenty of evidence to suggest that the average global temperature rise we have already experienced is associated with substantial changes in weather patterns over recent decades," the Greenpeace report says.

"Droughts have become more common since the 1970s. The frequency of intense tropical cyclones has also increased and there has been widespread retreat of mountain glaciers."

The Indian coastline is 'extremely vulnerable'
A Greenpeace report on climate change says that if greenhouse gas emissions grow at their present rate, South Asia could face a major human crisis.

"More than 120 million people from India and Bangladesh alone will become homeless by the end of this century," the report says.

It estimates that 75 million people from Bangladesh will lose their homes.

It predicts that about 45 million people in India will also become "climate migrants".

Intense cyclones

The report says that the number of people who could be affected by climate change is almost 10 times greater than the number of people who migrated during and after the partition of India in 1947.

Around 130 million people now live in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh in what are called low elevation coastal zones, which comprise coastal regions that are less than 10m above average sea level.

"There is already plenty of evidence to suggest that the average global temperature rise we have already experienced is associated with substantial changes in weather patterns over recent decades," the Greenpeace report says.

"Droughts have become more common since the 1970s. The frequency of intense tropical cyclones has also increased and there has been widespread retreat of mountain glaciers."

It is argued that India's weather is becoming less predictable

The study says that "if global temperatures rise by about 4-5C in the course of the century - as they are projected to - the South Asian region could face a wave of migrants displaced by the impact of climate change".

"Most of these people will be forced to leave their homes because of the sea-level rise and drought associated with shrinking water supplies and monsoon variability. The bulk of them will come from Bangladesh as most of the parts of that country will be inundated," Dr Sudhir Chella Rajan, a climate expert and author of the study, told the BBC.

"And Bangladesh is already experiencing the migration," says an activist from Bangladesh, Mohon Kumar Mondol.

"Though Bangladesh is hardly responsible for the global warming and climate change, the Bangladeshi people are paying the price for it - they have never heard of these terms but are suffering from them."

The report says the Indian coastline is also extremely vulnerable.

Several large cities within the low elevation coastal zone like Bombay (Mumbai) and Madras will go under the sea if the present growth rate of greenhouse emissions continue.

The report says that while huge investment is being made along the coast line of India, most of these projects are in the danger zone.

"This isn't going to happen gradually. What we are going to see is a series of coastal surges, you will see inundation, salt water intrusion - which will cause lots of harm and devastate a lot of these infrastructures," said Dr Rajan.

According to the Greenpeace report, major population movement from the coastal cities to other large urban centres like Delhi, Bangalore and Ahmedabad will take place.

"These cities will have serious resource constraints of their own by the middle of the century, but will have to be prepared to accommodate enormous numbers of migrants from the coasts."

BBC NEWS | South Asia | S Asia in climate change 'crisis'


and i thought it was nuclear conflict that would be the major threat to india.

i cant register anything but shock.
 

PakForce Unlimited

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Millions at risk in S. Asia from global warming


KOLKATA, March 25: Rising seas and water shortages will displace about 125 million people living along the coasts of India and Bangladesh by the turn of the century, Greenpeace said on Tuesday.

In a study on rapidly warming South Asia, the global environment group said climate change would also trigger erratic monsoons and break down agricultural systems in the vast and densely-populated Gangetic delta.

India, whose economy has grown by 8-9 per cent annually in recent years, is one of the world’s top polluters and contributes around four per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions as its consumption of fossil fuels grows.

“We cannot wait for the inevitable to happen and hope to adapt to it,” Vinuta Gopal, the group’s climate and energy campaigner in India, said, releasing the report on the ecologically sensitive region, one of the poorest in the world.

“We need policies that reduce the risk of destructive climate change, and moves towards economic development through decarbonisation,” Gopal said.

The UN Development Programme in its latest report has also warned climate change will hit the world’s poorest countries, increasing risks of disease, destruction of traditional livelihoods and triggering massive displacement.

Together, India, Bangladesh and Pakistan have nearly 130 million people living along coastal areas less than 10 metres (33 feet) above sea level, the Greenpeace report said.

“We are already seeing the effects,” said Sudhir Chella Rajan, the author of the report and a professor at the Indian Institute of Technology.

He said the effect of rising temperatures was already apparent in the recurrent floods in coastal Bangladesh.


The number of people displaced by global warming could dwarf the nearly 10 million refugees and almost 25 million internally displaced people already fleeing wars and oppression.

Christian Aid has predicted there will be one billion people displaced by climate change globally by 2050.

India, Bangladesh and Pakistan have a total population of about 1.4 billion people.—Reuters

Link: Millions at risk in S. Asia from global warming -DAWN - Top Stories; March 26, 2008
 

su-47

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no, time to cut down on emissions.

its not only South Asia at threat. coastal regions all over the northern hemisphere is facing this problem due to melting polar ice caps. but the problem is that people simply dont give a f**k. they'll only start caring once a couple of cities take a dip.
 

solid snake

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no, time to cut down on emissions.

its not only South Asia at threat. coastal regions all over the northern hemisphere is facing this problem due to melting polar ice caps. but the problem is that people simply dont give a f**k. they'll only start caring once a couple of cities take a dip.
Are you willing to slow down India's economic growth significantly to reduce emissions?
 

su-47

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its not just india. china is the second major polluter now. USA is still the big daddy of polluters. if only indian emissions are cut down, it wont make much of a difference. the whole world has to work together on this one. everyone has to cut down. if they continue polluting in the name of economic growth, they'll soon find that economic growth busted when dozens of their cities join Atlantis at the bottom of the ocean.

anyway, as the answer to your question, i think it is worthwhile to slow india's economic growth for the sake of the environmet. BUT it'll only make a major difference if the whole world joins in.
 

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