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Russia Considers a Fighters-For-Food Deal with Argentina

cb4

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WARSAW and LONDON — Russia and Argentina are eyeing a deal under which Moscow would lease 12 Sukhoi Su-24 Fencer aircraft to Buenos Aires in return for beef and wheat, the London-based paper Sunday Express has claimed.

As a result, the British Defence Ministry has reportedly launched a review of the air defenses of the Falkland Islands.

In a statement, the MoD said it regularly reviews the military situation around the south Atlantic islands and would adjust force levels on the Falklands to meet any new threat posed by Argentina.

"The MoD undertakes regular assessments of potential military threats to the Falkland Islands to ensure that we retain an appropriate level of defensive capability to address any threats. We continue to remain vigilant and committed to the protection of the Falkland Islanders," it said.

The UK and Argentina, who call the islands the Malivinas, were involved in a short but bloody war in 1982 over ownership of the disputed islands in the South Atlantic.

The dispute has been given new life in recent years by Argentinean President Cristina Kirchener making reclaiming the islands a central plank of her policy.

British analysts said Argentina's acquisition of a credible combat jet force could significantly tilt the strategic balance in favor of Buenos Aires, unless London reinforces the Falklands.

The Falklands are protected by four Royal Air Force Typhoon jets, Rapier surface-to-air missiles, and fewer than 1,200 troops, supported by a warship.

Doug Barrie, the senior air analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London and an expert on Russian aircraft and weapons, said that even with only four Typhoons, the British would come off better in any fight with a squadron's worth of the Su-24.

"I'd back four Typhoons every day of the week against the threat posed by the 1960/1970s technology of the Russian jet," he said.

The Su-24MK is a twin-engine, all-weather land and maritime attack aircraft with a flight range of 2,775 kilometers, according to data from Sukhoi.

Barrie said just how effective the Su-24 would be in the hands of the Argentine Air Force depended on the weapons package that came as part of any deal with the Russians.

"The Su-24 is not what Argentina needs. They have competent crews but they need a multi-role platform not a single-role air-to-surface aircraft, which is expensive to fly and expensive to maintain," he said.

Argentine press reports said Defence Minister Agustin Rossi has denied there is any new defense deal with Russia for fighter jets.

The Argentine Air Force is known to be in the market for a fighter jet to replace the obsolete fleet of Skyhawk and Mirage III aircraft it has operated for several decades.

The possible sale of second-hand Mirage 2000 and Kfir aircraft have been discussed.

Most recently a possible sale of Saab Gripen aircraft was raised by Argentina, but any possibility of that deal taking off was rapidly scotched by the British government.

British companies supply about 30 percent of the new Gripen NG model and the London said it would block any move to sell the advanced Swedish jet to Argentina.

Russian jets or the Chinese FC-1/JF-17 are often touted as potential platforms for the Argentine Air Force.

The hard-up Argentine government won parliamentary approval recently for an economic and investment deal with China.

In 2010, Moscow and Buenos Aires signed a deal under which Russia delivered two Mil Mi-17 helicopters to the country's Air Force, marking Argentina's first purchase of Russian military hardware.

This month, the two sides also struck a deal for Moscow to provide four second-hand tug/supply ships to the Armada Argentina.

In July, Russian President Vladimir Putin paid an official visit to Argentina, possibly paving the way for the deal.

Imports of Argentinian food and goods are viewed as an attempt to bypass Western sanctions imposed on Russia following the country's intervention in Ukraine and its annexation of the Crimean peninsula.

Report: Russia May Supply Su-24 Aircraft To Argentina In Exchange For Food
 

Penguin

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Try this comparison of Su-24 and Typhoon
Compare Aircraft Results

Typhoon has better power to weight ratio, speed, ceiling and range. It has medium range AAMs whereas the opponent only has short range AAMs. It has a 27mm cannon, rather than a 23mm cannon.

Comparison of JF-17 and Typhoon
Compare Aircraft Results


Typhoon is faster, has better ceiling but less range. Typhone has better thrust to weight ratio. Typhon can carry double the JF17 ordnance. 27mm versus 23mm cannon
 

Tshering22

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Why not Su-35s? Argentina can easily afford a few BMs. Half a dozen Su-35s should ensure the balance.
 

Ultima Thule

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Try this comparison of Su-24 and Typhoon
Compare Aircraft Results

Typhoon has better power to weight ratio, speed, ceiling and range. It has medium range AAMs whereas the opponent only has short range AAMs. It has a 27mm cannon, rather than a 23mm cannon.

Comparison of JF-17 and Typhoon
Compare Aircraft Results


Typhoon is faster, has better ceiling but less range. Typhone has better thrust to weight ratio. Typhon can carry double the JF17 ordnance. 27mm versus 23mm cannon
what crap you are writing basically Typhoon and Su-24 lies in a different classes, Su-24 ground attack aircraft similar role like F-111 Ardvark and Typhoon is more intended toward the air to air fighter with a secondary air to ground capability, and as for your comparison with JF-17, JF-17 is a light fighter where as Typhoon is medium wight fighter and also JF-17 is in the 4 gen category where as Typhoon is 4.5 gen, so your comparison is totally wrong:hitwall::hitwall::devil::blah::blah:
 

Superboy

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Can Russia use foreign aid money and give some planes to Argentina like how the US pays for Israel's fighter jets?
 
Jun 3, 2007
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Can Russia use foreign aid money and give some planes to Argentina like how the US pays for Israel's fighter jets?
I think this answer it. Next year Russia has to pay USD 110 Billion as foreign debt

BBC News - Russia reveals huge cost of supporting the rouble

The Russian central bank has revealed the huge cost of trying to prop up the value of the rouble. In the past year, the bank spent $76bn and 5.4bn euros as it repeatedly bought roubles on the foreign exchanges. The Russian currency has been under sustained pressure because of Western sanctions over Ukraine and because of the falling price of oil. In the event, during 2014, the rouble dropped by 41% against the dollar and by 34% against the euro.

Along with restrictions on the importation of foreign food, the severe fall in the rouble's value helped to push up the official Russian inflation rate to 11.4% by the end of the year. Prices rose by 1.3% in November and then by 2.6% in December alone, according to the country's Federal Statistics Service. The biggest bouts of so-called "intervention" on the foreign exchanges, aimed at stemming the rouble's slide, came in March when Russia annexed Crimea, and then in October and December when the fall in the price of oil was particularly steep. The rouble lost nearly a quarter of its value in just two days - 15 and 16 December - when Russian citizens panicked and tried to convert their money into foreign currencies.
 

Superboy

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I think this answer it. Next year Russia has to pay USD 110 Billion as foreign debt

BBC News - Russia reveals huge cost of supporting the rouble

The Russian central bank has revealed the huge cost of trying to prop up the value of the rouble. In the past year, the bank spent $76bn and 5.4bn euros as it repeatedly bought roubles on the foreign exchanges. The Russian currency has been under sustained pressure because of Western sanctions over Ukraine and because of the falling price of oil. In the event, during 2014, the rouble dropped by 41% against the dollar and by 34% against the euro.

Along with restrictions on the importation of foreign food, the severe fall in the rouble's value helped to push up the official Russian inflation rate to 11.4% by the end of the year. Prices rose by 1.3% in November and then by 2.6% in December alone, according to the country's Federal Statistics Service. The biggest bouts of so-called "intervention" on the foreign exchanges, aimed at stemming the rouble's slide, came in March when Russia annexed Crimea, and then in October and December when the fall in the price of oil was particularly steep. The rouble lost nearly a quarter of its value in just two days - 15 and 16 December - when Russian citizens panicked and tried to convert their money into foreign currencies.

Ruble is a number, in the computer. It is virtual, not physical. Fighter jets are physical, not virtual. You are comparing apples to oranges.
 

Penguin

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what crap you are writing basically Typhoon and Su-24 lies in a different classes, Su-24 ground attack aircraft similar role like F-111 Ardvark and Typhoon is more intended toward the air to air fighter with a secondary air to ground capability, and as for your comparison with JF-17, JF-17 is a light fighter where as Typhoon is medium wight fighter and also JF-17 is in the 4 gen category where as Typhoon is 4.5 gen, so your comparison is totally wrong:hitwall::hitwall::devil::blah::blah:
When you are done ranting, please explain what you consider to be the problem.
 

Penguin

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why you compare different Gen of fighters with Typhoon why?
Obviously because ... Typhoons are currently stationed on the Falkland Islands and previous posters introduced the possibility / scenario of Argentina acquiring Su-24s or JF-17 to supplement/replace its Mirage 5/IAI Dagger/Finger and Skyhawks. Which would make these potential adversaries, irrespective of their generation or oredominant roles: the Typhoons would be tasked with fending off any attacking Su-24 or JF-17 or Kfir or Mirage 2000 or Su-35. Hence the comparison. Is there a problem with that?
 
Last edited:

Ultima Thule

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Obviously because ... Typhoons are currently stationed on the Falkland Islands and previous posters introduced the possibility / scenario of Argentina acquiring Su-24s or JF-17 to supplement/replace its Mirage 5/IAI Dagger/Finger and Skyhawks. Which would make these potential adversaries, irrespective of their generation or oredominant roles: the Typhoons would be tasked with fending off any attacking Su-24 or JF-17 or Kfir or Mirage 2000 or Su-35. Hence the comparison. Is there a problem with that?
i didn't read above article, sorry my mistake, please forgive me :angel::angel::angel:
 
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WARSAW and LONDON — Russia and Argentina are eyeing a deal under which Moscow would lease 12 Sukhoi Su-24 Fencer aircraft to Buenos Aires in return for beef and wheat, the London-based paper Sunday Express has claimed.

As a result, the British Defence Ministry has reportedly launched a review of the air defenses of the Falkland Islands.

In a statement, the MoD said it regularly reviews the military situation around the south Atlantic islands and would adjust force levels on the Falklands to meet any new threat posed by Argentina.

"The MoD undertakes regular assessments of potential military threats to the Falkland Islands to ensure that we retain an appropriate level of defensive capability to address any threats. We continue to remain vigilant and committed to the protection of the Falkland Islanders," it said.

The UK and Argentina, who call the islands the Malivinas, were involved in a short but bloody war in 1982 over ownership of the disputed islands in the South Atlantic.

The dispute has been given new life in recent years by Argentinean President Cristina Kirchener making reclaiming the islands a central plank of her policy.

British analysts said Argentina's acquisition of a credible combat jet force could significantly tilt the strategic balance in favor of Buenos Aires, unless London reinforces the Falklands.

The Falklands are protected by four Royal Air Force Typhoon jets, Rapier surface-to-air missiles, and fewer than 1,200 troops, supported by a warship.

Doug Barrie, the senior air analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London and an expert on Russian aircraft and weapons, said that even with only four Typhoons, the British would come off better in any fight with a squadron's worth of the Su-24.

"I'd back four Typhoons every day of the week against the threat posed by the 1960/1970s technology of the Russian jet," he said.

The Su-24MK is a twin-engine, all-weather land and maritime attack aircraft with a flight range of 2,775 kilometers, according to data from Sukhoi.

Barrie said just how effective the Su-24 would be in the hands of the Argentine Air Force depended on the weapons package that came as part of any deal with the Russians.

"The Su-24 is not what Argentina needs. They have competent crews but they need a multi-role platform not a single-role air-to-surface aircraft, which is expensive to fly and expensive to maintain," he said.

Argentine press reports said Defence Minister Agustin Rossi has denied there is any new defense deal with Russia for fighter jets.

The Argentine Air Force is known to be in the market for a fighter jet to replace the obsolete fleet of Skyhawk and Mirage III aircraft it has operated for several decades.

The possible sale of second-hand Mirage 2000 and Kfir aircraft have been discussed.

Most recently a possible sale of Saab Gripen aircraft was raised by Argentina, but any possibility of that deal taking off was rapidly scotched by the British government.

British companies supply about 30 percent of the new Gripen NG model and the London said it would block any move to sell the advanced Swedish jet to Argentina.

Russian jets or the Chinese FC-1/JF-17 are often touted as potential platforms for the Argentine Air Force.

The hard-up Argentine government won parliamentary approval recently for an economic and investment deal with China.

In 2010, Moscow and Buenos Aires signed a deal under which Russia delivered two Mil Mi-17 helicopters to the country's Air Force, marking Argentina's first purchase of Russian military hardware.

This month, the two sides also struck a deal for Moscow to provide four second-hand tug/supply ships to the Armada Argentina.

In July, Russian President Vladimir Putin paid an official visit to Argentina, possibly paving the way for the deal.

Imports of Argentinian food and goods are viewed as an attempt to bypass Western sanctions imposed on Russia following the country's intervention in Ukraine and its annexation of the Crimean peninsula.

Report: Russia May Supply Su-24 Aircraft To Argentina In Exchange For Food
S-30s........................
 

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