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Royal Navy’s new Carrier Strike Group has assembled for the first time, marking the beginning of a new era of operations

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The US and UK navies prepare to sign agreement to merge their tech futures
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WASHINGTON – The U.S. Navy and British Royal Navy are preparing to more closely align their futures in a whole host of warfare areas, the U.S. chief of naval operations announced Tuesday.

The U.S. Navy’s chief of naval operations and First Sea Lord Adm. Tony Radakin intend to “sign a future integrated warfighting statement of intent that sets a cooperative vision for interchangeablty,” CNO Adm. Mike Gilday announced at the virtual Atlantic Future Forum, being held on board the RN’s new aircraft carrier Queen Elizabeth.

“We will synchronize pioneering capabilities, strengthen operating concepts and focus our collective efforts to deliver combined sea power together. By organizing our cooperation on carrier strike, underwater superiority, navy and marine integration and doubling down on future war fighting like unmanned and artificial intelligence, we will remain on the leading edge of great power competition.”

It is unclear what the specifics of the statement of intent will be, but the U.S. and Royal navies have been focusing heavily in recent years on aligning its capabilities to be useful to each other in combined maritime operations. The message from both navies is that this will continue into the future.

Throughout the Royal Navy’s effort to get the Queen Elizabeth ready for deployment, the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps have been working closely with the service, training British pilots on the F-35B and getting the ship certified to operate them. The Marine Corps' Fighter Attack Squadron 211 embarked on Queen Elizabeth earlier this month during the ship’s group exercise ahead of a deployment next year.

The Marines will also mix in with Royal Air Force F-35Bs during the QE’s 2021 deployment.
In remarks at the forum, Radkin echoed Gilday’s remarks, saying the two forces needed to continue to work to align efforts.

“Throughout our careers we have had a drive for interoperability with allies,” Radkin said. "But increasingly it feels to us that bar has to be raised. … The obvious example is the U.S. Marine jets on board the QE carrier. That is an obvious example of interchangeability.

“So, we are trying to drive a new standard. Partly to drive all of us to strengthen our interoperability but to go even higher and recognize that interchangeability is going to be an even stronger feature in the future.”
Radkin said the services would focus on four areas to grow this “interchangeability”: undersea warfare; carrier operations; aligning the efforts of the U.S. Marine Corps and Navy to become a cohesive fighting unit; and on advanced warfighting programs such as artificial intelligence and cyber.

The United Kingdom is in the middle of an integrated defense review, initiated after Boris Johnson was elected prime minster. It was interrupted during the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak but appears to be running again. The review could have sweeping impacts on the British defense budget, but it is unclear where the budget ax will fall.

When the review was announced, however, the government promised a “radical reassessment” of Britain’s place in the world.


It will take China decades to catch up with the US Navy
 

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Australia, UK sign frigate agreement
by Jon Grevatt
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Australia and the United Kingdom have signed an agreement to collaborate on BAE Systems’ AUD35 billion (USD25 billion) programme to build nine Hunter-class frigates for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

The frigates, the first of which is scheduled to enter service in the late 2020s, are based on the Type 26-class frigate that BAE Systems is building for the UK Royal Navy.

The Australian Department of Defence (DoD) said that the new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which was announced on 20 October, is positioned to support both countries and both projects. The MOU reinforces Australia and the UK’s “commitment to working together on delivering these important high-profile national programmes and maximising mutual opportunities”, it said.

The DoD added that the agreement is focused on supporting exchanges of information and efforts to engage industry in both countries, including providing opportunities to access each other’s supply chains.

“A key aspect of the MOU is a pledge for information exchange to ensure shipbuilding best practice is shared and both frigate programmes deliver world-beating maritime capabilities to the Royal Navy and Royal Australian Navy,” said the DoD,

The DoD added that the agreement also sets out a framework to “enable both nations to utilise the Type 26 and Hunter programmes to create jobs and contribute to the growth of the UK and Australian economies”. A focus of the accord was supporting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in both countries, it said.

 

khansaheeb

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British Type 45 destroyer is the outcome of lessons drawn from the costly Falklands War as well as operations in the Middle East. It is equipped with a sophisticated and well-positioned AESA radar system, fused with other types of sensor systems, to illuminate a wide range of threats from a distance and produce Fire Solution for many in one go, and scores of Aster series AAW munitions in the present. Type 45 hull design is also a leap from cramped hull designs of earlier generation destroyers which hindered munition deployment and storage among others.

Type 45 destroyer at a glance





Type 42 destroyer at a glance - the class which was involved in the Falklands war



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The British Carrier Battle Group being put together is incredibly advanced and sophisticated with 5th generation combat aircraft in the mix. With exception of USA, other countries are over a decade behind in this matter as a whole.
Where the Brits went wrong was not in the warships and technology they had but they failed to evaluate what the Argies had and that almost cost them the war. If the UK had gone to war with a country with a little more fire power the outcome would have been totally different.
 

mike2000 is back

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Australia, UK sign frigate agreement
by Jon Grevatt
View attachment 681593
Australia and the United Kingdom have signed an agreement to collaborate on BAE Systems’ AUD35 billion (USD25 billion) programme to build nine Hunter-class frigates for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

The frigates, the first of which is scheduled to enter service in the late 2020s, are based on the Type 26-class frigate that BAE Systems is building for the UK Royal Navy.

The Australian Department of Defence (DoD) said that the new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which was announced on 20 October, is positioned to support both countries and both projects. The MOU reinforces Australia and the UK’s “commitment to working together on delivering these important high-profile national programmes and maximising mutual opportunities”, it said.

The DoD added that the agreement is focused on supporting exchanges of information and efforts to engage industry in both countries, including providing opportunities to access each other’s supply chains.

“A key aspect of the MOU is a pledge for information exchange to ensure shipbuilding best practice is shared and both frigate programmes deliver world-beating maritime capabilities to the Royal Navy and Royal Australian Navy,” said the DoD,

The DoD added that the agreement also sets out a framework to “enable both nations to utilise the Type 26 and Hunter programmes to create jobs and contribute to the growth of the UK and Australian economies”. A focus of the accord was supporting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in both countries, it said.

Interesting how our Australian cousins have joined us in this endeavour. Hopefully they will be using our frigates in future when they are built and operational. Win-win Cooperation:cheers:
 

mike2000 is back

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New fighter jet can support 20,000 jobs, says BAE Systems
Edward Thicknesse

BAE Systems has said that its new fighter jet could support 20,000 jobs in the UK as it seeks to make the case for the new combat air system.
BAE Systems' new combat jet could provide a £25.3bn boost to the UK economy. (via Getty Images)
BAE Systems has said that its new fighter jet could support 20,000 jobs in the UK as it seeks to make the case for the new combat air system.
The Tempest programme, which is being delivered by the FTSE 100 company alongside a consortium of defence giants, is also predicted to contribute £25.3bn to the economy over its first thirty years.
Read more: BAE Systems posts weaker half-year profit as it predicts stronger end to 2020


The estimates come from an independent study by accountants PwC, which will form part of a business case to be presented to the government later this year.
According to the report, every year between 2026 and 250 the Tempest project will support 270 jobs for every 100 it directly creates.
It also found that for every £100 of direct value added generated by the programme’s partners, £220 of gross value added would be created across the economy.
The Tempest is intended to replace the Eurofighter jet. The project was launched in 2018 after France and Germany announced that they would work on a new fighter plane without the UK.
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The government has already poured £2bn into the project, with the aim of manufacturing beginning in 2025.
Fellow defence firms Leonardo UK, MBDA, and Rolls-Royce, alongside smaller firms such as GE Aviation and GKN Aerospace, make up the rest of the consortium.
Michael Christie, director of combat air acquisition programme at BAE, said: The initial analysis revealed today demonstrates that Tempest is critical to ensuring the UK can sustain its world-leading Combat Air Sector, preserving the sovereign capability that is essential to retaining military freedom of action for the UK.”
The PwC report was commissioned by BAE, with the full findings to be made available by the end of the year.
Read more: BAE Systems warns of drop in first half profit amid coronavirus disruption



The boss of sector body ADS said that the project could play a crucial role in the post-Covid recovery.
“It will embed high-value design and manufacturing skills in the UK for decades to come, sustain thousands of high paying jobs and give apprentices the opportunity to build their career in an iconic programme with massive export potential”, said Paul Everitt.


Really looking forward to this jet. We should need in the coming decades
 

UKBengali

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Man, tempest will be a game changer. I really hope our government really goes ahead with it until serial production. Since our defence giants are definitely capable of producing the most advanced fighter jets the world has to offer (maybe barring the US ). CANT WAIT TO SEE THAT BABY IN THE AIR. 🥰


Absolutely no way any UK government would destroy the UK military aerospace industry by not building Tempest.

I am fairly confident that QE Class carriers will get EMALs as they were built for but not with EMALS. The current engines on the carriers are more than sufficient for EMALS.

Also it makes economic sense to upgrade the carriers to EMALS for their mid-life upgrade as the tech will be mature and much cheaper then and the UK can add another 100 or so Tempest planes to the RAF order to help with economies of scale.
 

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There is even the possibility that the carriers may be reconfigured for EMALs when they get a mid-life upgrade and so we could even see Tempest and fully fledged AWACs flying off these ships in the 2040s.
:smitten:
The Royal Navy was evaluating a version of the V-22 Osprey for AWACS duties some years ago, still might happen. Designation from mfr. was EV-22. Very appropo, since radar and sensor pkgs. have gotten quite compact these days.



Failing that, we still have old fallback fixed wing option (E2C Hawkeye, now with more efficient powerplants), I don't know if the runway length of the QE class can accommodate the takeoff run for this one.


Churchill was a hero. Salute to him ...

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Churchill hated Indians and Pakistanis with a vengeance, he was a full-on racist. This is well documented.

But he also made the fateful decision to divert food grain from Bengal to feed troops in Europe, ergo Millions of Bengalis starved to death in a famine, all under the watch of the British Raj.

When informed of this, he commented that they "deserved it - since they bred like Rabbits".

Know your history...and sorry for the segway.

 
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gangsta_rap

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Churchill was a hero. Salute to him ...

View attachment 681847

naw dawg that cracka aint done nothin right
mufuggin white folks go around thinkin that winston homie doin right but that aint how it is
for real dawg that crackaass goin around tryin to start shit shootin folks up bombin them planes n shit dawg it aint pretty real talk it aint right

 

gangsta_rap

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He kiled [starved] couple of million Indians. Big help to Pakistan.
u aint right in the head real talk aint nothin right about that

gotta know how it is dawg gotta tell whitey whats up gotta teach those crackers how it is cause when some honkey *** goes around gettin all worked up n shit it aint gonna turn out right for nobody

 

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