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Renewable energy sector of Bangladesh.

Discussion in 'Bangladesh Defence Forum' started by Homo Sapiens, Jun 28, 2017.

  1. Homo Sapiens

    Homo Sapiens SENIOR MEMBER

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    BEZA to set up 1000MW solar electricity zone in Chandpur
    • Tribune Desk
    • Published at 03:08 PM June 23, 2017
    • Last updated at 03:43 PM June 23, 2017
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    "A major percentage of the electricity generated through this would be supplied to the national grid to help meet the growing demand for electricity"
    Bangladesh Economic Zone Authority (BEZA) has planned to set up a solar power zone in Baher Char area in Chandpur district with a target of generating at least 1000 megawatts (MW) of electricity.


    “The authority has started the process of acquiring around 4000 acres of land in Baher Char to develop the solar zone, which will be the country’s biggest hub for solar power,” said BEZA Executive Chairman Paban Chowdhury, reported BSS.

    The BEZA chief also said the solar power zone could be named after Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman if an approval is given by the Prime Minister Office.

    “Bangladesh Power Development Board (BPDB) and POWERCHINA have shown interest in developing the solar zone,” said the BEZA chief, hoping that the construction of the solar zone will begin soon so it can start generating electricity from next year..

    BPDB will get 1,000 acres land, and the rest 3,000 acres for POWERCHINA for setting up the solar zone.

    “A major percentage of the electricity generated through this would be supplied to the national grid to help meet the growing demand for electricity”, said BEZA chief.


    Also, BEZA plans to give the Power Division approx. 2,000 acres of land at Mirersharai Economic Zone in Chittagong to develop another solar hub to produce 600MW electricity.

    Bangladesh is now producing 15,379 MW of electricity and the government aims to generate 24,000 MW of power by 2021 and 60,000 MW by 2041 to meet the ever growing demand for electricity, of whose at least 10% would be met from renewable sources including solar power systems.

    http://www.dhakatribune.com/banglad...23/1000-mw-solar-electricity-zone-setup-beza/
     
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  2. Homo Sapiens

    Homo Sapiens SENIOR MEMBER

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    Kutubdia island wind power generation.


     
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  3. Bilal9

    Bilal9 ELITE MEMBER

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  4. Homo Sapiens

    Homo Sapiens SENIOR MEMBER

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    Bangladesh Plans 1.6 Gigawatts Of Solar Projects
    July 10th, 2017 by Saurabh Mahapatra


    Originally published on CleanTechies.

    Bangladesh is planning to to set up some large-scale solar power projects, the biggest in its history, as it looks to diversify its energy mix and enhance self-sufficiency in the energy sector.

    According to media reports, the Bangladesh Economic Zone Authority (BEZA) is planning to set up a solar zone which would house the country’s largest solar power project. BEZA is in talks with POWERCHINA to set up a solar power park with total capacity of 1 gigawatt. BEZA is expected to develop a fourth of the capacity, while POWERCHINA would likely develop the balance.

    BEZA is also reportedly planning to give away some land to the Bangladesh Power Division to set up 600 megawatts of solar power park.

    Bangladesh has virtually no utility-scale solar power projects and its power sector is heavily skewed towards thermal power technologies. Additionally, the country is also dependent of electricity imports from neighboring India.

    The government has taken some steps to attract foreign investment in the solar power market but no major progress has been reported on those initiatives so far.

    A subsidiary of SunEdison signed an agreement with the government of Bangladesh to set up a 200 megawatt solar project. The power purchase agreement for the project was signed by Southern Solar Power. The company will set up the project in partnership with a local firm — Midland Power — which will have a 20% equity stake in the project.

    The status of this project remains unknown given the bankruptcy of the SunEdison. There have been no reports about any company replacing SunEdison in the partnership with Midland Power.

    In 2015, SkyPower announced plans to build 2 GW of utility-scale solar energy over the next five years in Bangladesh, representing an investment of US $4.3 billion. The company also announced it will be gifting 1.5 million SkyPower Home solar kits to the people of Bangladesh over the course of the next five years. “SkyPower’s $4.3 billion USD investment will create more than 42,000 total job years in Bangladesh and will include 500 MW of fabrication and assembly facilities,” said SkyPower Chief Commercial Officer, Charles Cohen.

    The owner of India’s largest solar power project — Adani Green Energy — also recently expressed its intentions to set up large-scale solar power projects in Bangladesh. The company did not share any details but would likely be attracted by high feed-in tariffs available in Bangladesh.

    These and the recent plans would be welcomed by environmentalists who have heavily criticized the Bangladesh government for its plans to set up a huge coal-based power plant in the environmentally critical Sundarbans. Bangladesh has announced plans to set up a 1,320 megawatt coal power plant in the world’s largest mangrove forest.
    https://cleantechnica.com/2017/07/10/bangladesh-plans-1-6-gigawatts-solar-projects/
     
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  5. Banglar Bir

    Banglar Bir SENIOR MEMBER

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    Treading in dangerous waters
    Nimra Naeem
    Published at 04:11 PM July 30, 2017
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    Bigstock
    Why are both Pakistan and Bangladesh making the wrong energy choices?
    With the energy demand growing due to population explosions in South Asia, energy shortage is one of the biggest concerns our governments have to face.

    For Pakistan, overcoming the energy crisis is one of the biggest challenges which the present government aims to resolve in its tenure, even if it comes at huge environmental costs. Under the China Pakistan Economic Corridor, investments have been made in several energy projects in Pakistan including wind, solar and coal projects. The biggest investments have been made in setting up coal based power plants in Sahiwal, Gwadar and Port Qasim.

    From renewables to fossil: going in the wrong direction
    The share of coal in Pakistan’s energy mix-up has been low up till now, as Pakistan relies more on thermal, natural gas and hydro to meet its energy needs. The country has recently taken initiatives to increase energy production using renewables. Being a major sugar producer,

    Pakistan has an annual capacity to produce 30-40 million tons of sugar. The sugarcane waste that the industry produces is known as Bagasse which has a potential to produce an estimated 2000 MW of energy. It can be produced at a very low cost, because there is no fuel required for transportation as the sugar mills can generate electricity using in-house Bagasse co-generation power plants.

    The “Framework for Power Co-generation through Bagasse”will allow sugar producers to supply surplus electricity to the national grid. It is one of the cleanest forms of energy generation for Pakistan. Meanwhile, many rural homes in the country have electricity thanks to initiatives taken to provide low cost solar energy in rural Pakistan. Now with the coal power plants backed by Chinese investments, Pakistan is treading in dangerous waters.

    The Sahiwal power plant will require 4.48 million tons of sub-bituminous coal per annum, which is imported from Indonesia. Similarly, the Port Qasim Power project would require an estimated 4.66 million tons of coal per annum, also imported from Indonesia and South Africa. The imported coal is considered to be a cleaner form of coal compared to local coal, which holds a high amount of sulfur. So Pakistan has little choice other than taking up higher import costs in order to incur less environmental costs. Even if the plants are based on clean coal technology the amount of emissions can only be decreased, but is not a long term solution in reducing emissions, the way renewables can.

    It is possible to invest in renewable energy instead
    Unfortunately Bangladesh seems to be suffering from the same illusion as Pakistan. As environmental activists in Bangladesh protest against the Rampal coal power plant, the government assures its citizens that the plant uses clean coal technology which will curb the emissions. However, estimates by Greenpeace suggest a totally different picture, claiming that the plant would be the biggest source of air pollution in the country. Moreover, the plant is being constructed on the world’s largest mangrove forest, declared as a UN World heritage site. However supporters of the plant claim that this is just a controversy created by the activists, justifying the land’s proximity to River Poshur as an ideal location for the plant. But considering the huge risks of coal spills in the area which could contaminate the water and threaten the existence of endangered species, the concerns of the activists seem valid. Bangladesh too would be importing coal from either Australia or India, either way, increasing its costs.

    Pakistan and Bangladesh are amongst the countries most vulnerable to climate change, largely in part due to emissions generated by large industrialised countries. Isn’t it better, if instead of incurring huge costs setting up coal power plants, they divert the money into renewable energy? An interesting survey conducted in northern Pakistan showed 81 percent of respondents showing high interest in solar home systems. However, a significant majority (around 60 percent) also expected the government to provide incentives for them to use the system. If more incentives are provided to the sector, the prices of renewables would come down in developing countries and be market competitive, and more consumers would opt for renewables.

    But the first step is for us to realise that clean coal is not a viable long-term solution. There are very few success stories when it comes to clean coal technology, and those too after huge costs were incurred in setting up the infrastructure in richer countries. However, a trip to the remote areas of Pakistan will reveal the changes that clean and affordable solar energy has been able to make in people’s lives. These stories are the real success stories, often pushed to the sidelines, maybe because they aren’t as exciting, but these are the stories we need to talk about.
    http://www.dhakatribune.com/magazine/weekend-tribune/2017/07/30/treading-dangerous-waters/

    Coal, what’s it good for?
    Naim Ebna Rahman
    Published at 06:09 PM July 27, 2017
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    More harm than good?/REUTERS
    There are other sources of energy we need to be looking at
    Rapid industrialisation all over the world has given people cushy lives.

    It is undeniable that energy is the cornerstone of development in the modern era. With the passage of every single day, the demand for energy is climbing to its peak, and countries are now busy competing with each other to meet the growing demands of energy.

    But unhealthy competition in the energy sector has brought environmental issues like climate change upon us. Now we frequently have to withstand the devastating impacts of climate change-induced disasters like storms, cyclones, floods, etc.

    Evidently, Bangladesh is the most vulnerable country in this respect in the South Asian region, which means we have to immediately rethink the energy landscape to combat the climate change-caused natural disasters.

    Examining the world energy profile, it appears that demand of the global energy will further grow up to 40% by 2040.

    At present, gas is a dominant fuel in generating energy. In the upcoming days, coal will replace gas and hold the first position in the energy sector — producing more emissions across the globe.

    Bangladesh is no exception. It is predicted that reserve gas will be exhausted by 2020 and so it’s looking for an alternative source of energy. It is eying to increase coal use from 2% to over 50% in electricity supply by 2030.

    Dozens of coal-run electricity-generating plants are in the pipeline including a controversial one like Rampal. It is expected that Rampal alone will provide alone one-fifth of the country’s total production of electricity comprising 1,320 mega watts.

    Coal has become appealing for countries like Bangladesh and India for different reasons. Being cheap, coal is cost-effective, and so it opens doors to opportunities to produce new energy plants. Alarmingly, China and India are following the easy and economic way by introducing coal-run energy plants.

    Bangladesh should explore alternatives to coal for securing a better future for the next generations of Bangladeshis

    From 2002 to 2012, the global coal trade has doubled — where China and India account for the majority of coal imports. Then the question may rise: Are we not counting the risks of coal energy in this region?

    Risks and fatalities
    Bangladesh is a densely populated country, and pollution from coal energy will be catastrophic. Air pollution will be the direct result of coal-run electricity plants — worsening the situation, further damaging the environment. Coal pollutes the air, water, and soil all together leading to negative impacts on human and other species as well.

    Environmental specialists and activists are already protesting against the Rampal project, which can be detrimental to the Sundarbans.

    There have been many controversies over the Rampal project. Both countries should take rational decisions considering its environmental impacts in the Sundarbans region.

    Bangladesh should explore alternatives to coal for securing a better future for the next generations of Bangladeshis. Currently, gas ranks number one in the energy sector of Bangladesh, accounting for about 80% of total energy.

    It is expected that Bay of Bengal can be a good source of gas fields. Bangladesh needs to invest in exploration to take advantage of Bay of Bengal resources.

    Renewed hope
    Moreover, the much talked-about renewable energy sources should be considered, as they are environment-friendly. Being blessed with lots of rivers, Bangladesh has good potential in producing hydro-electricity, utilizing the current of the rivers.

    Solar is considered to be the most viable source of renewable energy. Bangladeshis striving to generate more energy from solar system by 2020 according to its seventh five year plan.

    Other sources like wind and biomass sources also should be explored for renewable energy. Due to several constraints and challenges, renewable energy is still not popular in Bangladesh.

    First of all, in many cases, renewable energy becomes costly for the producers. We have had bad experiences like the Kaptai project — which did not bring the desired results, and ultimately emerged as a development disaster. Moreover, there is a lack of incentives from the government and non-government agencies in this sector.

    Right now, at a macro level, governments should provide incentives by granting loans to renewable energy-oriented enterprises. Innovation and entrepreneurship should be encouraged by the governmental and non-governmental sector in the renewable energy sector.

    On the other hand, at a micro level, consumers should be more conscious and wise while using electricity. Solar panels can be used as an alternative source of power in households that can afford it.

    It’s time to turn to clean energy.

    Naim Ebna Rahman is a graduate student of development studies.
    http://www.dhakatribune.com/opinion/op-ed/2017/07/27/coal-whats-good/

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    সুন্দরবন ধ্বংস করে রামপাল বিদ্যুৎকেন্দ্র চাই না
    কারা কারা যেনো "বিশেষজ্ঞ" নাম নিয়ে মানুষকে বিভ্রান্ত করতে বলেন, সোলার-বায়ু বিদ্যুৎ দিয়ে কল-কারখানা চলবে না!!!
    আফসোসের বিষয় হচ্ছে, উনারা সাধারণ বিজ্ঞানটাই বুঝতে পারছেন না (নাকি ইচ্ছা করেই আড়াল করছেন!!)। বিজ্ঞান তো বলছে, বায়ু আর সৌর বিদ্যুৎ ফিল্টারিং করে গ্রীডে সংযোগ করার পর বোঝার কোন উপায় নাই যে কোন বিদ্যুৎ সোলার থেকে এসেছে আর কোনটা এসেছে কয়লা থেকে।

    উনাদেরকে একটা প্রশ্ন করা যায়, ডেনমার্ক ২০২০ সালের মধ্যেই ৫০ ভাগ আর ভারত ২০৩০ সালের মধ্যে শতকরা ৪০ ভাগ বিদ্যুৎ নবায়নযোগ্য জ্বালানী থেকে উৎপাদনের টার্গেট নিয়ে কাজ করছে। ভারত আর ডেনমার্ক কী তবে সেখানকার সব শিল্পকারখানা বন্ধ করে দেয়ার সিদ্ধান্ত নিয়েছে?

    জামানী কী বিশ্ববিখ্যাত গাড়ির ফ্যাক্টরীগুলো বন্ধ করে দেয়ার ঘোষণা দিয়েছে?

    solar 2.jpg
    #no_to_rampal #বাঁচাওসুন্দরবন #SaveSundarbans#SaveSundarban #StopRampal #antifa#NoToRampal
    #সুন্দরবনকে_ভালবাসি_পারলে_ঠেকাও #thinkgreen#notgrey #ElectricityMasterPlanBangladesh
    solar.jpg
     
  6. Banglar Bir

    Banglar Bir SENIOR MEMBER

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    12:00 AM, August 01, 2017 / LAST MODIFIED: 12:20 AM, August 01, 2017
    An alternative energy future for Bangladesh
    [​IMG]
    If Bangladesh is serious about combating climate change, off-grid renewable energy, such as solar home systems, needs to play a more central role in the country's energy infrastructure.
    Meraz Mostafa
    Off the coast of Bangladesh sits the small island of Manpura. Shaped like a banana when viewed from above, this will be the country's first “green island” powered by only renewable energy.

    Dreamt up by the Sustainable and Renewable Energy Development Authority, as part of a larger initiative to provide renewable energy to 250 other hard-to-reach places, Manpura will be powered by a mix of solar, wind and biogas.

    “We want to make it a green island,” explained Siddique Zobair from the energy authority. “This is part of the plan to ensure electricity to all by 2021.”

    While it is great that the country is investing in renewable energy, if you look at the overall picture, the nation's main energy source in a few years will be coal.

    And that is a problem. Because burning coal means greenhouse gases, and that means climate change. And as everyone knows, Bangladesh is at risk of climate change.
    Now renewable energy is still part of the government's plan, but it's a little unclear to what extent.

    The renewable energy policy from 2008 sets the goal at ten percent renewable energy by 2020, whereas the power master plan from 2016 has the goal at three percent for 2021. Not to mention, last year, Bangladesh along with other climate vulnerable countries at the UN climate talks committed to 100 percent renewable energy by 2050.

    Within the current paradigm of development, which believes every citizen's access to grid electricity is fundamental to the country's ability to develop and grow its economy, an overhaul to renewable energy is unlikely any time soon.

    But there might be another way for the country to have a clean energy revolution—it would just require some rethinking of our chosen development pathway.
    Coal, coal
    Currently, we rely on natural gas for most of our country's energy needs. Yet as the supply of easily accessible natural gas runs out, we have decided to turn to coal.

    Over the next few years, the government is planning to build at least a dozen new coal plants to light up the country. While Bangladesh does have its own natural reserve of coal, it is buried fairly deep and so the current proposal is to import coal from India and other nearby countries.

    While this may meet the country's growing energy demands—and provide electricity to the millions of households that currently have no access—it will inevitably raise the country's greenhouse gas emissions.

    Based on what the government reported to the UN climate body, the country expects to increase emissions almost threefold by 2030.

    Like many developing nations, Bangladesh argues it has a right to burn fossil fuels in order to develop. After all, the country has historically emitted very little—less than half a percent of total global emissions.

    But it is hard to fully support this argument, knowing full well that Bangladesh is also in great danger of climate change. With a population of 160 million, living in a relatively small area of land, the country faces major challenges in food security and other areas because of such changes in the atmosphere.

    Now the government has told the UN climate body it will reduce its projected emissions by five percent, and with international support by 15 percent.

    We could be more ambitious, of course, we would just need to imagine an alternative energy future—one that relies far more on off-grid renewable energy.

    On becoming a solar nation
    Over four million solar home systems have been distributed in Bangladesh over the last five years. That amounts to about 150 mega-watts of electricity servicing close to 20 million people.

    But this year, the distribution of solar home systems dropped. The underlying reason (in my opinion, at least): across the country, grid electricity is valued over off-grid renewables.

    Somehow solar panels are associated with being backwards in rural Bangladesh, with being poor. In people's mind, only when you are connected to the energy grid do you have any status and are “developed” like the rest of the country.

    Making things worse are the lone electric poles that stand tall in villages, built by politicians who have promised access to the grid in a few short years. Why would villagers invest in solar when they are expecting grid access in a few short years?

    Another reason why the solar home system market has been saturated is because of a government “food for work” programme, where solar home systems were given out for free, further decreasing their value in people's eyes—nobody wants to buy something others are receiving for free.

    Ironically, the customers most likely to purchase solar home systems at the moment are those already on the grid. They are the ones who realise grid power is not always as reliable as they were led to believe.
    A brighter future
    Perhaps another way forward for Bangladesh is to have a serious discussion about energy futures—both in terms of consumption and production. Most of the work in reducing greenhouse gases has been in reducing CO2 emissions; but on the flip side of that is reducing consumption. Does everybody really need to consume the energy that they do?

    There are off-the-grid energy alternatives in Bangladesh that would potentially support rural livelihoods better than the grid—especially with the development of mini-grids spreading, whereby villagers can stock and trade solar energy with their neighbours for a small fee.

    And a major benefit of solar home systems is that they are a kind of lo-fi technology, meaning they can be repurposed. This is why many fishermen now light up their boats at night with solar panels.

    A decentralised energy infrastructure would also be more resilient to shocks. When the grid breaks down, whole regions are left without power. In a decentralised energy system, even if one solar village lost power all the other villages would remain fine.

    Bangladesh was fairly realistic in its pledge to the UN climate body to unconditionally reduce five percent of its projected emissions by 2030. But the country could become even more ambitious in combating climate change if it were to consider off-grid renewable energy as a more central part of its energy infrastructure.

    Manpura, and other hard-to-reach sites, would no longer have to be the exception, but the path to a different type of development. They could act as examples of what a decentralised off-grid renewable energy system in Bangladesh could look like.
    http://www.thedailystar.net/op-ed/alternative-energy-future-bangladesh-1441663
     
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  7. bluesky

    bluesky ELITE MEMBER

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    The present BEZA project is praiseworthy. BEZA should build many such solar plants in the coastal and remote uninhabited islands/shoals to produce more power from solar energy, and connect those plants to the national grid via underground/underwater cables.
     
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