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Pakistani father of 35 aims for 100​

QUETTA:A Pakistani father of 35 is now searching for a fourth wife as he romps towards his goal of 100 children, a dubious ambition in the conservative Muslim country where polygamy is rare but still practiced.

Sardar Jan Mohammad Khilji, 46, says he believes it is his religious duty to have as many children as possible.

Insisting it is "very rare" that he mixes up his children's names, the medical technician said he juggles their affections by taking turns to attend family events with them and their mothers, such as weddings.

There's now a site specifically for people who want second wives

His three current wives support his procreational and matrimonial goals, he said, adding that they all live in harmony together -- though he would not allow AFP to speak with them.

Rights activists warn it is women and children who suffer most in polygamous marriages.

Pakistani men are permitted to take up to four wives under Islam, though to do so they must seek permission from their first wife and an arbitration council.

It remains rare for men to take multiple wives in the country, but when polygamy does take place, studies have shown it can result in "depression and despair" among wives, while children often struggle to know their father, said Rafia Zakaria, a women's rights activist.

The Quran, she told AFP, dictates that multiple wives may be taken only when a husband can do "perfect justice" among them.

"Well, perfect justice is impossible, and for this reason polygamy is never a good situation," said Zakaria, who campaigns against the practice.

"Someone always suffers and almost always it is the women and children," she added.

Family lawyer Mohammed Bilal Kasi, who deals with polygamy cases in Quetta agreed.

Why not four spouses for Muslim women too, asks Indian judge

"We lawyers are well aware of social problems surrounding polygamy," he said. "Women and children undergo mental agony due to these affairs."

The tension can lead to serious legal disputes over property and rights after the father's death, he said.

Denied his permission to speak, Jan's wives could not describe what life is like for his sprawling dynasty, who all live together in a five-bedroom mud hut in the outskirts of Quetta in restive Balochistan province.

At least two of his children appear to support his goals, however, including his eldest child Shagufta Nasreen.

"A large family is like Allah bestowing a case of mangoes," the 15-year-old explained, adding that she hopes to go into medicine like her father.

Jan's eldest son, 13-year-old Mohammed Esa, also wanted to emulate the patriarch -- but he has set his sights even higher, resolving that he will have more than 100 children.

Jan, who claims he is a qualified medical technician, runs an unregulated clinic where he treats people for minor ailments such as headaches, adding that as he is "serving humanity" he charges just 250 rupees ($2.30) per patient while providing his services to the poor for free.

He also runs a seminary funded by donations where nearly 400 students -- including four of his sons -- are studying the Quran, and says he pays for 20 of his 35 children to attend private school.

The household expenditures of his growing empire, however, can reach up to 120,000 rupees per month -- more than ten times Pakistan's average -- in a neighbourhood that lacks basic amenities such as tap water and sewage, he said.

Men misinterpreting Quran to marry more than once, says Indian HC

He insisted he has never faced any financial problems trying to care for his brood, but did not explain how he could cover all the expenses with just pay for his medical work.

Jan conceded that his needs may increase as his children grow and so is calling on the government to allocate funds for the food, education, and healthcare of his family -- a request that is unlikely to be fulfilled.

But Jan has faith. If the government does not listen, he said, he trusts in God to provide.

Pakistan has the highest birth rate in South Asia -- around three children per woman according to World Bank and government figures -- though an accurate census has not been conducted in more than 30 years.

Jan put his fertility down to daily doses of fresh and dry fruits, milk and meat; as well as reciting the Holy Quran and praying five times a day.

While his eldest child is 15, his youngest is just a few weeks old. At the beginning of March he was still a father of merely 33, but that month two more daughters were born within six days of one another, he says.

His marriages were all arranged by his parents. "I married the first one...when I was 26 years old, and the next year wedded the other two within a gap of five months," he told AFP.

His next wedding, however, could be arranged via Facebook: since his story aired in Pakistani media, he says, he has had a slew of marriage offers via the social network.

A large poster on the wall at Jan's house carries the symbol he used when he ran for provincial office in 2013: a double bed, which, he told AFP, "denotes special pleasure and meaning in my life".

That time at least, his ambition fell short: he garnered 980 votes, not nearly enough to win.

 

INS_Vikrant

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Since he is 46 nearing end of reproductive age, even with fourth wife it is almost impossible now for him to fulfill his dream of hitting a century, very few overs left and required run rate is way too high.
 

HydraChess

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A large poster on the wall at Jan's house carries the symbol he used when he ran for provincial office in 2013: a double bed, which, he told AFP, "denotes special pleasure and meaning in my life".
o_O Real life is stranger than fiction!

Since he is 46 nearing end of reproductive age,
Aadmi aur Ghoda kabhi budhe naheen hote.
 

jamahir

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"A large family is like Allah bestowing a case of mangoes," the 15-year-old explained, adding that she hopes to go into medicine like her father.

Eh what ! Now Pakistan being a Capitalist-but-with-elements-of-Islam country, when this happy case of mangoes arrives at the time when the mango farmer's estate has to be distributed the case of mangoes will no longer be happy. I don't think even with Islamic freedom for multiple marriages a male or a female will marry more than four times and even then no sane man will think of siring 100 children, unless there's been an asteroid strike upon Earth and these are among the few people to survive.
 

fitpOsitive

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Pakistani father of 35 aims for 100​

QUETTA:A Pakistani father of 35 is now searching for a fourth wife as he romps towards his goal of 100 children, a dubious ambition in the conservative Muslim country where polygamy is rare but still practiced.

Sardar Jan Mohammad Khilji, 46, says he believes it is his religious duty to have as many children as possible.

Insisting it is "very rare" that he mixes up his children's names, the medical technician said he juggles their affections by taking turns to attend family events with them and their mothers, such as weddings.

There's now a site specifically for people who want second wives

His three current wives support his procreational and matrimonial goals, he said, adding that they all live in harmony together -- though he would not allow AFP to speak with them.

Rights activists warn it is women and children who suffer most in polygamous marriages.

Pakistani men are permitted to take up to four wives under Islam, though to do so they must seek permission from their first wife and an arbitration council.

It remains rare for men to take multiple wives in the country, but when polygamy does take place, studies have shown it can result in "depression and despair" among wives, while children often struggle to know their father, said Rafia Zakaria, a women's rights activist.

The Quran, she told AFP, dictates that multiple wives may be taken only when a husband can do "perfect justice" among them.

"Well, perfect justice is impossible, and for this reason polygamy is never a good situation," said Zakaria, who campaigns against the practice.

"Someone always suffers and almost always it is the women and children," she added.

Family lawyer Mohammed Bilal Kasi, who deals with polygamy cases in Quetta agreed.

Why not four spouses for Muslim women too, asks Indian judge

"We lawyers are well aware of social problems surrounding polygamy," he said. "Women and children undergo mental agony due to these affairs."

The tension can lead to serious legal disputes over property and rights after the father's death, he said.

Denied his permission to speak, Jan's wives could not describe what life is like for his sprawling dynasty, who all live together in a five-bedroom mud hut in the outskirts of Quetta in restive Balochistan province.

At least two of his children appear to support his goals, however, including his eldest child Shagufta Nasreen.

"A large family is like Allah bestowing a case of mangoes," the 15-year-old explained, adding that she hopes to go into medicine like her father.

Jan's eldest son, 13-year-old Mohammed Esa, also wanted to emulate the patriarch -- but he has set his sights even higher, resolving that he will have more than 100 children.

Jan, who claims he is a qualified medical technician, runs an unregulated clinic where he treats people for minor ailments such as headaches, adding that as he is "serving humanity" he charges just 250 rupees ($2.30) per patient while providing his services to the poor for free.

He also runs a seminary funded by donations where nearly 400 students -- including four of his sons -- are studying the Quran, and says he pays for 20 of his 35 children to attend private school.

The household expenditures of his growing empire, however, can reach up to 120,000 rupees per month -- more than ten times Pakistan's average -- in a neighbourhood that lacks basic amenities such as tap water and sewage, he said.

Men misinterpreting Quran to marry more than once, says Indian HC

He insisted he has never faced any financial problems trying to care for his brood, but did not explain how he could cover all the expenses with just pay for his medical work.

Jan conceded that his needs may increase as his children grow and so is calling on the government to allocate funds for the food, education, and healthcare of his family -- a request that is unlikely to be fulfilled.

But Jan has faith. If the government does not listen, he said, he trusts in God to provide.

Pakistan has the highest birth rate in South Asia -- around three children per woman according to World Bank and government figures -- though an accurate census has not been conducted in more than 30 years.

Jan put his fertility down to daily doses of fresh and dry fruits, milk and meat; as well as reciting the Holy Quran and praying five times a day.

While his eldest child is 15, his youngest is just a few weeks old. At the beginning of March he was still a father of merely 33, but that month two more daughters were born within six days of one another, he says.

His marriages were all arranged by his parents. "I married the first one...when I was 26 years old, and the next year wedded the other two within a gap of five months," he told AFP.

His next wedding, however, could be arranged via Facebook: since his story aired in Pakistani media, he says, he has had a slew of marriage offers via the social network.

A large poster on the wall at Jan's house carries the symbol he used when he ran for provincial office in 2013: a double bed, which, he told AFP, "denotes special pleasure and meaning in my life".

That time at least, his ambition fell short: he garnered 980 votes, not nearly enough to win.

But he is an exception. There are many who are struggling with infertility. And the later case is actually on the rise in Pakistan.
 

jamahir

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But he is an exception. There are many who are struggling with infertility. And the later case is actually on the rise in Pakistan.

But help and advancement is at hand. Below report from 2019 speaks of mice embryo partially developed with sperm or egg :
For the first time, artificial embryos made without sperm or eggs have started to form live fetuses after being implanted in female mice. However, the embryos had some malformations and we are still a long way from being able to make human babies this way.

The artificial mouse embryos were made from scratch using special stem cells called extended pluripotent stem cells. These have the ability to generate all three cell types found in early embryos.

Jun Wu at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and his colleagues coaxed the stem cells to turn into the three embryo cell types and self-assemble into embryo-like structures by soaking them in nutrients and growth stimulants. “They essentially did the job on their own – you could see the cells that would become the placental tissue moving to the outside while others that would form the fetus moved to the inside,” he says.

The team then transferred the artificial embryos to the uteruses of female mice, where 7 per cent successfully implanted. A week later, the implanted embryos were surgically removed by caesarean section. Microscopic examination showed they had started to form early fetal structures, albeit with major malformations. “The tissue structure and organisation were not as good as in normal embryos,” says Wu.

How embryos grow​

This experiment is the first time artificial embryos have started to develop into fetal tissue in a uterus. Other groups have made artificial mouse embryos from stem cells but they haven’t successfully implanted or have only been able to form placental cells but not the other cell types once implanted.

The challenge now will be to fine-tune the artificial mouse embryos so they can develop into perfectly formed fetuses, says Wu. This may involve growing them in a mix of nutrients and growth stimulants that more closely matches the environment that embryos are normally exposed to inside the body, he says.

Read more: Making babies: How to create human embryos with no egg or sperm

However, the reason for doing this isn’t to generate offspring, says Wu. Testing the ability of artificial embryos to grow in the womb allows us to see how realistic they are, he says. Once they are considered realistic enough, researchers will be able to use them as substitutes for real embryos that are normally harvested from mice. “Our goal is to have a scalable system for producing hundreds or even thousands of these embryo-like structures,” says Wu.

The embryo models could be studied in dishes to better understand early mammalian development, optimise IVF conditions and screen drugs for their potential to cause birth defects, says Wu.

Babies from ears?​

Nevertheless, the findings do hint that it may be possible to generate offspring from artificial embryos, says Wu. Some of the extended pluripotent stem cells his team used to make the artificial embryos were originally made by reprogramming ear cells from adult mice. Hypothetically speaking, if we could do the same with human ear, skin or other non-reproductive cells, we could generate viable human embryo-like structures without sperm or eggs. “But this remains science fiction,” says Wu.

There are no good scientific or medical reasons to make human babies from artificial embryos made without sperm or eggs, says Nicolas Rivron at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology in Vienna, Austria.

Read more: Stem cell technique could reverse a major type of infertility

However, artificial embryos made this way could potentially be used to study fertility problems in the future, he says. For example, we might be able to take skin cells from an infertile person, use them to form artificial embryos, then study their growth in the lab to identify any genetic causes of infertility, he says. “Along with the possibility to test drugs, this could help to prevent or fix pregnancy-related problems.”

Journal reference: Cell, DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.09.029
Imagine this technology being used to produce living populations for other worlds.

finally good news

Unfortunate that India hasn't got this problem. :(

The thread should be reported for altering the original title of the news article.

Sidd chacha, don't be cranky.
 

El Sidd

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Sidd chacha, don't be cranky.

Every other month there are threads made like these. Its a constant cycle of propaganda aimed at one particular denominator.

It's a free country. Nobody is forcing vasectomy on the populace nor is anyone forcing people to reproduce.
 

Bengal71

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Since he is 46 nearing end of reproductive age, even with fourth wife it is almost impossible now for him to fulfill his dream of hitting a century, very few overs left and required run rate is way too high.

He is a man, men can father children even in their 70s or even in 80s. All it takes in one healthy semen.
 

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